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Thread: Home made remedy for powdery mildew

  1. #1
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    Home made remedy for powdery mildew

    Baking Soda Recipe for Controlling Powdery Mildew on Plants
    A Home Remedy for Fungus Diseases

    Baking soda makes an inexpensive control for powdery mildew on plants. The baking soda fungicide is mostly effective as a preventative, offering only minimal benefits after your plants have become infected. Weekly spraying of susceptible plants during humid or damp weather can greatly reduce the incidence of powdery mildew in your garden.

    To control powdery mildew on plants, mix together:

    1 tablespoon of baking soda
    Ĺ teaspoon of liquid soap
    1 gallon of water
    Do not store unused mixture. While this recipe has been known to be effective, it can burn the leaves of some plants. It is recommended that you water your infected plants well a couple of days before applying this mixture, and donít apply it in full sun. Try on a small area first, to test the plantís response before spraying the entire plant.
    Some recipes also recommend applying 1 tablespoon of ultralight horticultural oil to the mixture. The oil coats and smothers the fungi. The soap is added to help the mix spread and cling to the leaf surface. Be sure to apply to lower leaf surfaces as well.

    Researchers are still studying the effects of using a baking soda mixture on other fungal diseases such as: black spot, rust and anthracnose.

    Powdery Mildew
    Controlling and Preventing Powdery Mildew on Plants

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common and easily recognized plant diseases. Almost no type of plant is immune, however some are more susceptible than others. Lilacs, crab apples, phlox, monarda, roses, grapes, squash and cucumbers are all likely targets for powdery mildew.


    Recognizing Powdery Mildew
    As the name implies, powdery mildew looks like powdery splotches of white or gray, on the leaves and stems of plants. There are actually several types of powdery mildew fungi, but they all look basically the same. You may not notice a problem until the top surfaces of the leaves turn powdery, but powdery mildew can also affect the lower leaf surface, stems, flowers, buds and even the fruit.
    Although powdery mildew is unattractive, it is rarely fatal. However it does stress the plant and severe or repetitive infections will weaken the plant. If enough of the leaf surface becomes covered with powdery mildew, photosynthesis is impaired. Infected leaves often fall prematurely. This can be a particular problem on edible crops, since insufficient photosynthesis can diminish the flavor of the fruit or vegetable. If buds become infected, they may not open and mature at all.

    Powdery mildew fungi are host specific, meaning the different powdery mildew fungi infect different plants. The powdery mildew on your lilacs will not spread to your grapes or your roses. However all powdery mildews favor the same conditions.


    What Causes Powdery Mildew?
    Powdery mildew fungi seem to be everywhere. They overwinter in plant debris begin producing spores in the spring. These spores are carried to your plants by wind, insects and splashing water. Conditions that encourage the growth and spread of powdery mildew include:
    Dampness or high humidity (Not common during rainy seasons or in extreme heat)
    Crowded plantings
    Poor air circulation

    Controlling Powdery Mildew
    Choose healthy plants and keep they growing healthy
    Try and find a powdery mildew resistant cultivar, if your area is susceptible
    Donít plant non-resistant varieties in the shade
    Once Your Plants are Infected:

    Remove and destroy all infected plant parts
    Improve air circulation by thinning and pruning
    Donít fertilized until the problem is corrected. Powdery mildew favors young, succulent growth
    Donít water plants from above

    Apply a fungicide: There are many fungicides available. Check the label to be sure they are safe and effective on the type of plant that is infected. Look for ingredients such as: potassium bicarbonate, neem oil, sulfur or copper. There are also chemical fungicides, such as triforine, that can be used on ornamental plants. There is also a home remedy made from baking soda that is effective.
    Most fungicides will need repeat applications every 7 - 14 days, for continuous protection. Always follow the label instructions for both application and waiting period before harvest

  2. #2
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    Re: Home made remedy for powdery mildew

    Great post, very informative. I am presently experimenting with a home made version of the Growers Trust brand of powdery mildew killer. They use a 2.4 % geranium oil mix with water and small amounts of oleic acid (i use high heat sunflower oil as it has over 85% oleic acid) and citric acid (lemon juice). They do not give the exact amounts for the last two, but using common sense, I might of come up with the right mixture. This spray can be used right throughout flowering and can be applied directly to the buds. I bought a 16 oz bottle of the real thing for 20 bucks, waited a week for it, and did not have enough to apply to the small room of 10 plants. The ingredients set me back about the same amount, but I can mix up gallons of the stuff. I have applied some to one infected branch and will update my progress for anyone interested.

  3. #3
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    Re: Home made remedy for powdery mildew

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharkey68 View Post
    Great post, very informative. I am presently experimenting with a home made version of the Growers Trust brand of powdery mildew killer. They use a 2.4 % geranium oil mix with water and small amounts of oleic acid (i use high heat sunflower oil as it has over 85% oleic acid) and citric acid (lemon juice). They do not give the exact amounts for the last two, but using common sense, I might of come up with the right mixture. This spray can be used right throughout flowering and can be applied directly to the buds. I bought a 16 oz bottle of the real thing for 20 bucks, waited a week for it, and did not have enough to apply to the small room of 10 plants. The ingredients set me back about the same amount, but I can mix up gallons of the stuff. I have applied some to one infected branch and will update my progress for anyone interested.
    Let me know how you get on just noticed some mildew on me girls could do with some info x

  4. #4
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    Re: Home made remedy for powdery mildew

    Well, things went both good and bad. The first thing to make certain of with this is to get unscented or descented geranium oil. Nobody wants to smoke pot that smells like roses. I opened the bottle and cursed my ignorance, but decided to test out the mixture on a small branch to determine if it would work. When sprayed in the dark with a full 11 hours to dry, the branch tested seemed healthy and free of mold. The few leaves I tested in the light burned up, I assume due to the oils in the mixture.

    I would advise not using this until I have tested it with unscented oils and at a slightly reduced mixture. And avoid the Growers Trust unless you are rich and desperate. 20 dollars and a week later, my plants still have mildew, though the growth was slowed.

    I tried a sample of a product called Green Cleaner (Old Stage Garden Products) that I picked up at the local hydro shop. It is a combo mite/mildew remover, and i am very satisfied with the results. My plants were in the sixth week of flowering and even after a full dosage (which they don't recommend) my buds were still healthy and growing, but the mildew was not. Three days later, I see little spots creeping up, but the progress has been substantially slowed. What is even better, a small 2 ounce sample bottle makes 1 gallon of full strength and 4 gallons of diluted strength spray. This is by far the most affordable and safe solution I have managed to find. It must be a new product because I could not find a website.

    I hope this helps.
    dr.h00k likes this.