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Thread: Water and Cannabis

  1. #1
    420 Member Medical Marijuana's Avatar
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    Water and Cannabis

    Water, the fluid of life, makes up more than 80 percent of the weight of the living plant. Within the cells, life processes take place in a water solution. Water also dissolves nutrients in the soil, and this solution is absorbed by the roots. About 99 percent of the water absorbed passes from the roots into the conduits (xylem) of the stem, where it is distributed to the leaves via the xylem of the leaf veins. Transpiration is the evaporation of water from the leaves. The flow of water from the soil, through the plant to the air, is called the transpiration stream. Les then one percent of the water absorbed is broken down to provide electrons (usually in the form of hydrogen) which, along with carbon dioxide, are used to form carbohydrates during photosynthesis. The rest of the water is transpired to the air.

    Watering

    Water provides hydrogen for plant growth, and also carries nutrients throughout the plant in the transpiration stream. However, it is not true that the more water given a plant, the faster it will grow. Certainly, if a plant is consistently under-watered, its growth rate slows. However, lack of water does not limit photosynthesis until the soil in the pot is dry and the plant is wilting.

    The amount of water, and how often to water, varies with the size of the plants and pots, soil composition, and the temperature, humidity, and circulation of the air, to name a few variables. But watering is pretty much a matter of common sense.

    During germination, keep the soil surface moist. But once the seedling are established, let the top layer of soil dry out before watering again. This will eliminate any chance of stem rot. Water around the stems rather than on them. Seedlings are likely to fall over if watered roughly; use a hand sprinkler.

    In general, when the soil about two inches deep feels dry, water so that the soil is evenly moist but not so much that water runs out the drainage holes and carries away the soil's nutrients. After a few trials, you will know approximately how much water the pots can hold. Marijuana cannot tolerate a soggy or saturated soil. Plants grown in constantly wet soil are slower-growing, usually less potent, and prone to attack from stem rot.

    Over-watering as a common problem; it develops from consistently watering too often. When the plants are small, they transpire much less water. Seedlings in large pots need to be watered much less often than when the plants are large or are in small pots. A large pot that was saturated during germination may hold enough water for the first three weeks of growth. On the other hand, a six-foot plant in a six-inch pot may have to be watered every day. Always water enough to moisten all the soil. Don't just wet the surface layer.

    Under-watering is less of a problem, since it is easily recognised. When the soil becomes too dry, the plant wilts. Plant cells are kept rigid by the pressure of their cell contents, which are mostly water. With the water gone, they collapse. First the bottom leaves droop, and the condition quickly works its way up the plant until the top lops over. If this happens, water immediately. Recovery is so fast, you can follow the movement of water up the stem as it fills and brings turgor to the leaves. A plant may survive a wilted condition of several days, but at the very least some leaves will drop.

    Don't keep the pots constantly wet, and don't wait until the plant wilts. Let the soil go through a wet and dry cycle, which will aerate the soil and aid nutrient uptake. Most growers find that they need to water about once or twice a week.

    When some soils get particularly dry, the water is not absorbed and runs down the sides and out the bottom of the pot. This may be a problem the first time you water the soil, or if you allow the soil to get very dry. To remedy, add a couple of drops of liquid detergent to a gallon of water. Detergent acts as a wetting agent and the water is absorbed more readily. First water each pot with about one cup of the solution. Allow the pots to stand for 15 minutes, then finish watering with the usual amount of pure water.

    Use tepid water; it soaks into the soil more easily and will not shock the roots. Try to water during the plant's morning hours. Water from the top of the pot. If you do want to water from the bottom with trays (not recommended), place a layer of pebbles or gravel in the trays to insure drainage. Don't leaves the pots sitting in water until the pot is heavily saturated. The water displaces the soil's oxygen, and the plants grow poorly.

    Tap water in some areas highly chlorinated, which does not seem to harm Cannabis; and many fine crops are raised with water straight from the tap. But chlorine could possibly affect the plants indirectly, by killing some beneficial micro-organisms in the soil. Chlorine also makes the water slightly acidic. However, neither effect is likely to be serious. Some growers have asked whether they should use pet-shop preparations that are sold to remove chlorine from water in fish tanks. These preparations generally add sodium, which removes the chlorine by forming sodium chloride (table salt). This solution does not harm the plants, although repeated use may make the soil too saline. Probably the best procedure is to simply allow the water to sit in an open container for a few days. The chlorine is introduced to water as the gas Cl2, which dissipates to the air. The water temperature also reaches a comfortable level for the plants.

    Hard (alkaline) water contains a number of minerals (e.g., Ca++, Mg++, K+) which are essentially nutrients to the plants. Water softeners remove these minerals by replacing them with sodium, which forms slightly salty water. It is much better to water with hard water, because artificially softened water may prove harmful after some time. Occasionally, water may be acidic (sulphurous). Counteract this by mixing one teaspoon of hydrated lime per quart water and watering with the solution once a month.

    Water and Potency

    We've seen no studies that have evaluated potency in relation to water. A few studies have mentioned the fact that plants that received less water were slightly more potent. Water stress has been practiced by several marijuana-growing cultures. In parts of India, watering is kept to a minimum during flowering.

    To limit watering, water with the usual amounts but as infrequently as possible. To encourage good growth, yet keep watering to a minimum, wait until the plants are a few months old before you curtail watering. Give the plants their normal water and note the number of days before they begin to wilt. As the plants get larger, the water needs increase, but this generally stabilises by the time of flowering

  2. #2
    420 Member brothergrimm's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Thanks Moose! Good info. I need a constant reminder not to over water. It is so hard to sit around and do nothing! Grrrr! It feels so irresponsible... patience...

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    420 Member berrydizzle's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Wow, probably the best article I've ever read. Thanks soo much moose. How can you make sure your soil has good enough drainage?

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    You should water when the plant needs it, when the soil is dry, or almost dry.

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    420 Member Ugodmade's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Great info .. I guess i should not be dip watering ? I to have to be reminded to leave them alone lol

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Yes, water when it's dry (or almost dry) and give it enough water till you get a bit of run-off from the bottom. There are so many variable, like temp, humidity, medium, that it's hard to say how many times per week.

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    420 Member berrydizzle's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Around 2 inches, but not bone dry...is should still be a little damp. Or am I wrong, someone who knows otherwise?

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    420 Member SourSkunkD's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    when i fell my leaves the fell dry, im in my transitional phase of 12/12 what do you think is best?
    WINNING!!!!! :

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    420 Member iminadaze's Avatar
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Another excellent writeup

    Now I want to know how to increase the flow through the transpiration stream. I know CO2 increases metabolism but the plant still only takes in a certain amount of it. Anyone ever try a high carb drink like the ones smoke shops sell to pass pee-pee tests?

    Would air being pumped into the soil be beneficial?

    Is there such a thing as a plant steroid?

    Oh boy! the gears in my head are spinning now.
    A*K*A The Dizzle
    "The place where all my buds are hangin!"......

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Would you recommend spending the money for a reverse osmosis filtration system? I am trying to figure out how to get the best source of water right by my setup. Some say reverse osmosis but I also have read that it wastes about 4 times what it gives you. That doesn't seem efficient at all. If it is the best though, I will do it. Thanks for the help guys. Great water article.

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    I like RO water because it takes the guess work out of what can be in your tap water. I wont drink tap water. Ive done a couple of water tower inspections (because I am a diver) and decided I would never drink tap water again, so I also wont let my dog drink it or my plants.

    I think its worth it to use RO water.

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Quote Originally Posted by puffpuff View Post
    I like RO water because it takes the guess work out of what can be in your tap water. I wont drink tap water. Ive done a couple of water tower inspections (because I am a diver) and decided I would never drink tap water again, so I also wont let my dog drink it or my plants.

    I think its worth it to use RO water.
    Thanks for the reply. I worked at a water filtration plant before and I know that in my state we have really good water but I hate guessing and actually I am more worried about plumbing in an old house. I like the idea of having RO to give me piece of mind but I also don't like the idea of creating large amounts of unnecessary waste. Does anyone know of a method that is more efficient?

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Hello Im glad I found this site,hello to all, I live in the U.P. of Mi. and Im new at growing,but we all have to start somewhere,Iv all ready learned that Im watering my plants way to much,have a nice day,friends welcom.
    Quote Originally Posted by Medical Marijuana View Post
    Water, the fluid of life, makes up more than 80 percent of the weight of the living plant. Within the cells, life processes take place in a water solution. Water also dissolves nutrients in the soil, and this solution is absorbed by the roots. About 99 percent of the water absorbed passes from the roots into the conduits (xylem) of the stem, where it is distributed to the leaves via the xylem of the leaf veins. Transpiration is the evaporation of water from the leaves. The flow of water from the soil, through the plant to the air, is called the transpiration stream. Les then one percent of the water absorbed is broken down to provide electrons (usually in the form of hydrogen) which, along with carbon dioxide, are used to form carbohydrates during photosynthesis. The rest of the water is transpired to the air.

    Watering

    Water provides hydrogen for plant growth, and also carries nutrients throughout the plant in the transpiration stream. However, it is not true that the more water given a plant, the faster it will grow. Certainly, if a plant is consistently under-watered, its growth rate slows. However, lack of water does not limit photosynthesis until the soil in the pot is dry and the plant is wilting.

    The amount of water, and how often to water, varies with the size of the plants and pots, soil composition, and the temperature, humidity, and circulation of the air, to name a few variables. But watering is pretty much a matter of common sense.

    During germination, keep the soil surface moist. But once the seedling are established, let the top layer of soil dry out before watering again. This will eliminate any chance of stem rot. Water around the stems rather than on them. Seedlings are likely to fall over if watered roughly; use a hand sprinkler.

    In general, when the soil about two inches deep feels dry, water so that the soil is evenly moist but not so much that water runs out the drainage holes and carries away the soil's nutrients. After a few trials, you will know approximately how much water the pots can hold. Marijuana cannot tolerate a soggy or saturated soil. Plants grown in constantly wet soil are slower-growing, usually less potent, and prone to attack from stem rot.

    Over-watering as a common problem; it develops from consistently watering too often. When the plants are small, they transpire much less water. Seedlings in large pots need to be watered much less often than when the plants are large or are in small pots. A large pot that was saturated during germination may hold enough water for the first three weeks of growth. On the other hand, a six-foot plant in a six-inch pot may have to be watered every day. Always water enough to moisten all the soil. Don't just wet the surface layer.

    Under-watering is less of a problem, since it is easily recognised. When the soil becomes too dry, the plant wilts. Plant cells are kept rigid by the pressure of their cell contents, which are mostly water. With the water gone, they collapse. First the bottom leaves droop, and the condition quickly works its way up the plant until the top lops over. If this happens, water immediately. Recovery is so fast, you can follow the movement of water up the stem as it fills and brings turgor to the leaves. A plant may survive a wilted condition of several days, but at the very least some leaves will drop.

    Don't keep the pots constantly wet, and don't wait until the plant wilts. Let the soil go through a wet and dry cycle, which will aerate the soil and aid nutrient uptake. Most growers find that they need to water about once or twice a week.

    When some soils get particularly dry, the water is not absorbed and runs down the sides and out the bottom of the pot. This may be a problem the first time you water the soil, or if you allow the soil to get very dry. To remedy, add a couple of drops of liquid detergent to a gallon of water. Detergent acts as a wetting agent and the water is absorbed more readily. First water each pot with about one cup of the solution. Allow the pots to stand for 15 minutes, then finish watering with the usual amount of pure water.

    Use tepid water; it soaks into the soil more easily and will not shock the roots. Try to water during the plant's morning hours. Water from the top of the pot. If you do want to water from the bottom with trays (not recommended), place a layer of pebbles or gravel in the trays to insure drainage. Don't leaves the pots sitting in water until the pot is heavily saturated. The water displaces the soil's oxygen, and the plants grow poorly.

    Tap water in some areas highly chlorinated, which does not seem to harm Cannabis; and many fine crops are raised with water straight from the tap. But chlorine could possibly affect the plants indirectly, by killing some beneficial micro-organisms in the soil. Chlorine also makes the water slightly acidic. However, neither effect is likely to be serious. Some growers have asked whether they should use pet-shop preparations that are sold to remove chlorine from water in fish tanks. These preparations generally add sodium, which removes the chlorine by forming sodium chloride (table salt). This solution does not harm the plants, although repeated use may make the soil too saline. Probably the best procedure is to simply allow the water to sit in an open container for a few days. The chlorine is introduced to water as the gas Cl2, which dissipates to the air. The water temperature also reaches a comfortable level for the plants.

    Hard (alkaline) water contains a number of minerals (e.g., Ca++, Mg++, K+) which are essentially nutrients to the plants. Water softeners remove these minerals by replacing them with sodium, which forms slightly salty water. It is much better to water with hard water, because artificially softened water may prove harmful after some time. Occasionally, water may be acidic (sulphurous). Counteract this by mixing one teaspoon of hydrated lime per quart water and watering with the solution once a month.

    Water and Potency

    We've seen no studies that have evaluated potency in relation to water. A few studies have mentioned the fact that plants that received less water were slightly more potent. Water stress has been practiced by several marijuana-growing cultures. In parts of India, watering is kept to a minimum during flowering.

    To limit watering, water with the usual amounts but as infrequently as possible. To encourage good growth, yet keep watering to a minimum, wait until the plants are a few months old before you curtail watering. Give the plants their normal water and note the number of days before they begin to wilt. As the plants get larger, the water needs increase, but this generally stabilises by the time of flowering

  14. #14
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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    Great read, thanks for sharing

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    Re: Water and Cannabis

    This is a good article.

    I do things a little differently, but I like to see a scientific approach that is articulate and makes sense. I have grown a long time and my ways work for me so I won't change much. Good to read that tap water is usually safe. I let my water season out of the tap a few days before using it. That is something I have always done.

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