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Thread: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hybrid

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    420 Member SmokeyMacPot's Avatar
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    What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hybrid

    Indicas:
    Indica plants are short, bushy, mature early, have more chlorophyll and less accessory pigments (accessory pigments protect the plant from excessive sunlight).
    As Indica strains have more chlorophyll than sativa they grow and mature faster.

    Sativas:
    Sativa plants are taller, take longer to mature, have less chlorophyll and more accessory pigments (accessory pigments protect the plant from excessive sunlight).
    As Sativa strains have less chlorophyll than Indica they take longer to grow, mature, and require more light.

    Hybrids:
    Hybrid plants have a combination of both Indica and Sativa growth characteristics which are relative to strain ratio.

    Author: MedMan

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    420 Member Medical Marijuana's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Cannabis Indica And Sativa

    The Differences between Indica and Sativa Cannabis plants:

    Fat Leaves and Short Bush = INDICA


    Thin Leaves and Tall Bush = SATIVA


    Indica....higher CBD than THC equals heavier, sleepy type of high. Yield is usually higher than Sativa, and shorter growing season. Better for indoor growing, because they don't get as tall.

    Sativa....higher THC than CBD equals cerebral, soaring type of high, more energetic Yield is usually lower than Indica, but is very potent. eg: Thai Sativa grow taller and have a longer flowering period, so they are better suited for outdoors.

    Sativa's typically take longer to germinate and flower, and they grow more gangly then indica breeds.



    More info on Indica/Sativa identification:
    Sativas are just about the opposite of Indicas. They are tall, thin plants, with much narrower leaves and grow a lighter green in color. They grow very quickly and can reach heights of 20 feet in a single season. They originally come from Colombia, Mexico, Thailand and Southeast Asia. Once flowering has begun, they can take anywhere from 10 to 16 weeks to fully mature. Flavors range from earthy to sweet and fruity. Sativa's higher THC than CBD equals cerebral, soaring type of high, more energetic which can stimulate brain activity and may produce hallucinations.

    Sativa plants are taller, take longer to mature, have less chlorophyll and more accessory pigments (accessory pigments protect the plant from excessive sunlight). As Sativa strains have less chlorophyll than Indica they take longer to grow, mature, and require more light.

    Sativa typically takes longer to germinate and flower also, and grows more gangly then Indica breeds.

    Yield is usually lower than Indica, but is very potent. Thai Sativa grows taller and has a longer flowering period, so they are better suited for outdoors.
    Indicas originally come from the hash producing countries of the world like Afghanistan, Morocco, and Tibet. They are short dense plants, with broad leaves and often grow a darker green. After flowering starts they will be mature in 6 to 8 weeks. The buds will be thick and dense, with flavors and aromas ranging from pungent skunk to sweet and fruity. The smoke from an Indica is generally a body type stone, relaxing and laid back. Indica's higher CBD than THC equals a much heavier, sleepy type of high. Indica plants have a heavy, stony high that is relaxing and can help different medical problems.

    Indica yield is usually higher than Sativa, and shorter growing season. Better for indoor growing, because they don't get as tall.

    Indica plants are short, bushy, mature early, have more chlorophyll and less accessory pigments (accessory pigments protect the plant from excessive sunlight). As Indica strains have more chlorophyll than sativa they grow and mature faster.

    Combining different indicas, different sativas or a combination thereof creates hybrids. The resulting hybrid strains will grow, mature and smoke in relationship to the indica/sativa percentages they end up containing.




    Here is a quote from Hilary Black of the British Columbia Compassion Society:

    "Indica and Sativa are the two main varieties of the cannabis plant used as medicine. There are many strains that are crosses of those two varieties. Within each of those varieties and crosses there are a huge number of individual strains, each with a different cannabinoid profile and effect. According to anecdotal evidence, the Indica strains are a relaxant, effective for anxiety, pain, nausea, appetite stimulation, sleep, muscle spasms and tremors, among other symptoms. The Sativa strains are more of a stimulant, effective in appetite stimulation, relieving depression, migraines, pain and nausea. We are now aware of specific strains that are effective for specific conditions and symptoms."
    Last edited by Medical Marijuana; 05-12-2008 at 11:50 PM.

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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Great post, nice pics, wonderful info...
    MnMCrazy likes this.

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    420 Member biggreenbuds4's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    mooooose you are the man

    what is cbd ?

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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Marijuana
    Cannabinoids (THC, CBD, CBN...)

    The Active Ingredients Of Cannabis

    Cannabis products include marijuana, hashish, and hashish oil.

    THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) gets a user high, a larger THC content will produce a stronger high. Without THC you don't get high.

    CBD (Cannabidiol) increases some of the effects of THC and decreases other effects of THC. High levels of THC and low levels of CBD contribute to a strong, clear headed, more energetic high.

    Cannabis that has a high level of both THC and CBD will produce a strong head-stone that feels almost dreamlike. Cannabis that has low levels of THC and high levels of CBD produces more of a buzz or stoned feeling. The mind feels dull and the body feels tired.

    CBN (Cannabinol) is produced as THC ages and breaks down, this process is known as oxidization. High levels of CBN tend to make the user feel messed up rather than high.

    CBN levels can be kept to a minimum by storing cannabis products in a dark, cool, airtight environment. Marijuana should be dry prior to storage, and may have to be dried again after being stored somewhere that is humid.

    THCV (Tetrahydrocannabivarin) is found primarily in strains of African and Asian cannabis. THCV increases the speed and intensity of THC effects, but also causes the high to end sooner. Weed that smells strong (prior to smoking) might indicate a high level of THCV.

    CBC (Cannabichromene) is probably not psychoactive in pure form but is thought to interact with THC to enhance the high.

    CBL (Cannabicyclol) is a degradative product like CBN. Light converts CBC to CBL.

    If you are a grower, you can experiment with different strains of cannabis to produce the various qualities you seek. A medical user looking for something with sleep inducing properties might want to produce a crop that has high levels of CBD.

    Another user looking for a more energetic stone will want to grow a strain that has high levels of THC and low levels of CBD. In general, Cannabis sativa has lower levels of CBD and higher levels of THC. Cannabis indica has higher amounts of CBD and lower amounts of THC than sativa. See marijuana strains.

    For a more scientific description, see below for an excerpt from marijuana growers guide by Mel Frank.

    Cannabis is unique in many ways. Of all plants, it is the only genus known to produce chemical substances known as herbal cannabinoids. These cannabinoids are the psychoactive ingredients of marijuana; they are what get you high, buzzed, or stoned. By 1974, there were 37 naturally occurring cannabinoids that had been discovered.

    There are 3 types of cannabinoids:
    --- Herbal: occur naturally only in the cannabis plant
    --- Endogenous: produced naturally by humans and other animals
    --- Synthetic: cannabinoids produced in a lab

    Most of the cannabinoids appear in very small amounts (less than .01 percent of total cannabinoids) and are not considered psychoactive, or else not important to the high. Many are simply homologues or analogues (similar structure or function) to the few major cannabinoids which are listed.

    There are several numbering systems used for cannabinoids. The system used here is based on formal chemical rules for numbering pyran compounds (any of a class of organic compounds of the heterocyclic series in which five carbon atoms and one oxygen atom are present in a ring structure). Another common system is used more by Europeans and is based on a monoterpenoid system which is more useful considering the biogenesis of the compound.

    Tetrahydrocannabinol - THC

    Delta 9-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol - delta-9 THC is the main psychotomimetic (mindbending) ingredient of marijuana. Estimates state that 70 to 100 percent of the marijuana high results from the delta-9 THC present. It occurs in almost all cannabis in concentrations that vary from traces to about 95 percent of all the cannabinoids in the sample.

    In very potent strains, carefully prepared marijuana can be 30 percent delta-9 THC by dry weight (seeds and stems removed from flowering buds). Buds are the popular name given to masses of female flowers that form distinct clusters.

    Delta 8-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol - delta-8 THC is reported in low concentration, less than one percent of the delta-9 THC present. Its activity is slightly less than that of delta-9 THC. It may be an artefact of the extraction/analysis process. Almost everyone who uses the term THC, refers to delta-9 THC and delta-8 THC combined, as THC.

    Cannabidiol - CBD

    Cannabidiol - CBD also occurs in almost all strains. Concentration range from none, to about 95 percent of the total cannabinoids present. THC and CBD are the two most abundant naturally occurring cannabinoids. CBD is not psychotomimetic in the pure form, although it does have sedative, analgesic, and antibiotic properties.

    In order for CBD to affect the high, THC must be present in quantities ordinarily psychoactive. CBD can contribute to the high by interacting with THC to potentiate (enhance) or antagonize (interfere or lessen) certain qualities of the high.

    CBD appears to potentiate the depressant effects of THC and antagonize is excitatory effects. CBD also delays the onset of the high but can make it last considerably longer (as much as twice as long). The kind of grass that takes a while to come on but keeps coming on.

    Opinions are conflicting as to whether it increases or decreases the intensity of the high, intensity and high being difficult to define. Terms such as knock-out or sleepy, dreamlike, or melancholic are often used to describe the high from grass with sizeable proportions of CBD and THC.

    When only small amounts of THC are present with high proportions of CBD, the high is more of a buzz, and the mind feels dull and the body de-energized.

    Cannabinol - CBN

    Cannabinol - CBN is not produced by the plant per se. It is the degradation (oxidative) product of THC. Fresh samples of marijuana contain very little CBN but curing, poor storage, or processing such as when making hashish, can cause much of the THC to be oxidized to CBN. Pure forms of CBN have at most 10 percent of the psychoactivity of THC.

    Like CBD, it is suspected of potentiating certain aspects of the high, although so far these effects appear to be slight. CBN seems to potentiate THC's disorienting qualities. One may feel more dizzy or drugged or generally messed up but not necessarily higher.

    In fact, with a high proportion of CBN, the high may start well but feels as if it never quite reaches its peak, and when coming down one feels tired or sleepy. High CBN in homegrown grass is not desirable since it represents a loss of 90 percent of the psychoactivity of its precursor THC.

    Tetrahydrocannabivarin - THCV

    Tetrahydrocannabivarin - THCV or THV is the propyl homologue of THC. In the aromatic ring the usual five-carbon pentyl is replaced by a short three-carbon propyl chain. The propyl cannabinoids have so far been found in some strains originating from Southeast and Central Asia and parts of Africa.

    In one study, THCV made up to 48.23 percent (Afghanistan strain) and 53.69 percent (South Africa) of the cannabinoids found. We've seen no reports on its activity in humans. From animal studies it appears to be much faster in onset and quicker to dissipate than THC. It may be the constituent of one or two toke grass, but its activity appears to be somewhat less than that of THC. Some people use the term THC to refer collectively to delta-9 THC, delta-8 THC, and THCV.

    An interesting note is that people who have a prescription for Marinol (synthetic medical THC) may be tested for THCV. Marinol contains no THCV, if a person tests positive it means they have been using marijuana, or another cannabis product. This is usually sufficient grounds to terminate the prescription of a person who has signed a contract not to ingest any cannabis while taking Marinol.

    Cannabichromene - CBC

    Cannabichromene - CBC is another major cannabinoid, although it is found in smaller concentrations than CBD and THC. It was previously believed that is was a minor constituent, but more exacting analysis showed that the compound often reported as CBD may actually be CBC.

    Relative to THC and CBD, its concentration in the plants is low, probably not exceeding 20 percent of total cannabinoids. CBC is believed not to be psychotomimetic in humans; however, its presence in plants is purportedly very potent has led to the suspicion that it may be interacting with THC to enhance the high.

    Cannabicyclol - CBL

    Cannabicyclol (CBL) is a degradative product like CBN. During extraction, light converts CBC to CBL. There are no reports on its activity in humans, and it is found in small amounts, if at all, in fresh plant material.

    Cannabinoids And The High

    The marijuana high is a complex experience. It involves a wide range of psychical, physical, and emotional responses. The high is a subjective experience based in the individual and one's personality, mood, disposition, and experience with the drug.

    Given the person, the intensity of the high depends primarily on the amount of THC present in the marijuana. Delta-9 THC is the main ingredient of marijuana and must be present in sufficient quantities for a good marijuana high.

    People who smoke grass that has very little cannabinoids other than delta-9 THC usually report that the high is very intense. Most people that don't smoke daily will feel something from a joint having delta-9 THC of 3 percent concentration to material.

    Cannabis products having a THC concentration of 5-10 percent would be considered good, 10-25 percent would be considered very good, and over 25 percent would be excellent quality by daily users standards. In general, we use potency to mean the sum effects of the cannabinoids and the overall high induced.

    Marijuana is sometimes rated more potent than the content of delta-9 THC alone would suggest. It also elicits qualitatively different highs. The reasons for this have not been sorted out. Few clinical studies with known combinations of several cannabinoids have been undertaken with human subjects.

    So far, different highs and possibly higher potency seem to be due to the interaction of delta-9 THC and other cannabinoids (THCV,CBD,CBN, and possibly CBC). Except for THCV, in the pure form, these other cannabinoids do not have much psychoactivity.

    Another possibility for higher potency is that homologues of delta-9 THC with longer side chains at C-3 (and higher activity) might be found in certain marijuana strains.

    Compounds with longer side chains have been made in laboratories and their activity is sometimes much higher, with estimates over 500 times that of natural delta-9 THC.

    The possibility that there are non-cannabinoids that are psychoactive or interacting with the cannabinoids has not been investigated in detail. Non-cannabinoids with biological activity have been isolated from the plants, but only in very small quantities.

    None are known to be psychotomimetic. However, they may contribute to the overall experience in non-mental ways, such as the stimulation of the appetite.

    Different blends of cannabinoids account for the different qualities of intoxication produced by different strains of cannabis. The intensity of the high depends primarily on the amount of delta-9 THC present and on the method of ingestion.

    A complex drug such as marijuana affects the mind and body in many ways. Sorting out what accounts for what response can become quite complex.


    Books

    Cannabis and Cannabinoids:
    Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Therapeutic Potential

    Researchers from Europe, the US, Australia, and Brazil focus on the health aspects of cannabis and cannabinoids, mentioning social and political dimensions only when required within the medicinal discussion.

    They consider botany, taxonomy, chemistry, and history; pharmacology and pharmacokinetics; indications for cannabis and THC; risks and side effects; other cannabinoids; and other constituents of cannabis.
    Cannabis and Cannabinoids (paperback)
    Cannabis and Cannabinoids (hardcover)



    Marijuana Botany

    Very good book about breeding marijuana and improving the quality and quantity of your crop. This has information from doctors, scientists, horticulturists, and other professionals. Collected from 50 years of laboratory and field research.

    Not for the small time grower, this is more for commercial operations and advanced growers. Understanding this book requires that you have a some knowledge of horticultural and scientific terminology.
    Marijuana Botany



    Marijuana Chemistry:
    Genetics, Processing And Potency

    Explains the various cannabinoids that marijuana is made up of and how things like growing conditions, harvesting, processing, affect the potency of the final product.

    Lots of tables, graphs, and other info. Recommended for the intermediate and expert marijuana grower, this is heavy on chemistry. If you do not have a very good grasp of science and chemistry this book is not for you.
    Marijuana Chemistry



    The Cannabis Breeder's Bible:
    The Definitive Guide to
    Marijuana Genetics, Cannabis Botany
    and Creating Strains for the Seed Market

    Very good book for the marijuana grower that would like to produce their own premium seed variety for personal use, or to market and sell worldwide. Contains photographs, illustrations, and interviews with breeders and seed bank professionals.

    Covers such topics as genetics and breeding, the science of cannabis (DNA, evolution, etc), developing your own strain, international seed law issues, protecting your new breeds or strains from being produced and sold by others, shipping seeds and clones, breeding lab designs, product testing, common mutations, and more.
    The Cannabis Breeder's Bible

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    420 Member Medical Marijuana's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    bump

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    420 Member eBUD's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    woah, love the info..... def props yo. GO Med!!!!!

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    420 Member InSiDeThAvOiD's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Thanks for the good read and research there

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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    that was great info, i really enjoyed it. keep up the good work, yall are great and we love learnin from ya
    If it ain't green it ain't us your parents hate us because we smell like cannabis....

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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    I want a tree like that!

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    New Member wolfgang's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    good stuff!

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    420 Member HAPPY GRASS's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Good Stuuf, I probably learned more about the chemicals in cannabis in these couple of minutes that I have in years of smoking it.
    If It Aint Green... It Aint Me!!!

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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    good info, I needed to know some of these things

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    420 Member GangaKing's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Wow...
    I better read that again..
    and Again.
    Thank you Sir!

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    420 Member jojojones's Avatar
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    Re: What are the Different Growth Characteristics Associated with Indica, Sativa & Hy

    Great Info...

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