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Thread: Time to Put Down the Labels

  1. #1
    Cannabis Connoisseur Jim Behr's Avatar
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    Time to Put Down the Labels

    One thing that strikes me as particularly outdated is all of the rhetoric I still see in emails and on websites labeling some as ‘Conservatives’ and others as ‘Liberals’. It seems to me that a so-called conservative who opposes state sovereignty is just as much aligned with the Federal Government as the most passionate Obama supporter. Conversely, a Democrat who takes a strong stand in support of state sovereignty and the 10th deserves to be met with praise by Tenthers.

    Long have the labels of partisan politics succeeded in dividing the full and massive force of a people scorned. I want to submit to each and every one in the Tenth movement that if you do the difficult thing and welcome the ‘other side’ you are helping to assemble a Left-Right coalition that cannot be stopped.

    I urge all who desire a repulsion of the Federal Government’s grasp to see our people not as Left and Right, or even center but rather as those for or against centralization.

    It’s time to stop judging by labels. Give your so called opponent an opportunity to stand behind the 10th amendment and if they do, welcome them to the movement.

    Those who’ve previously stood with the Republican party have been the quickest to support the 10th, partially due to a Corporate Media assault that frames sovereignty as a right-wing movement. Sovereignty is NOT a right-wing position, any more than the philosophies of the Neo-Conservatives, whose origins can be traced to Democrat Scoop Jackson. Sovereignty is not a left-wing position, despite the strong backing of the Medical Marijuana legalizers at NORML.

    Sovereignty is a FREEDOM issue and in the end, freedom and liberty are the goals of most average people, even the ‘Libs’.


    NewsHawk: User: http://www.420magazine.com/
    Source: Tenth Amendment Center
    Author: Bryce Shonka
    Copyright: 2009 Tenth Amendment Center
    Contact: Tenth Amendment Center| Contact
    Website: Time to Put Down the Labels|Tenth Amendment Center Blog
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  2. #2
    Cannabis Connoisseur Jim Behr's Avatar
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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    Marijuana, Prohibition and the Tenth Amendment
    By Susan Shelley

    Sooner or later the question will have to be asked: Does the federal government have the power under the Constitution to stop cities and states from legalizing marijuana?

    The answer may be no.

    Federal law bans the possession of marijuana. But if a simple federal law can ban marijuana, why did Prohibition of alcohol require a constitutional amendment?

    A little history answers that question. The U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1789 to provide a framework for governing a nation composed of thirteen separate, sovereign states, each with its own state constitution and government. This was a new concept known as federalism.

    James Madison explained that the federal government would have only the powers delegated to it by the Constitution. Those powers would be "few and defined," he said, while the powers remaining in the state governments would be "numerous and indefinite."

    The states remained suspicious that the new federal government would encroach on their powers. They demanded and got ten amendments to the Constitution that specifically banned Congress from passing laws on matters that were understood to be within state control. The Tenth Amendment flatly declared, "The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states respectively, or to the people."

    In 1919, the United States enacted a national ban on the manufacture, sale or transportation of intoxicating liquors. Because the Constitution did not give the federal government the power to regulate alcohol, Prohibition required a constitutional amendment, which was approved by two-thirds of the House and two-thirds of the Senate, then ratified by the legislatures of three-quarters of the states.

    In 1933, the nation reconsidered. A constitutional amendment repealing Prohibition was approved by two-thirds of the House and two-thirds of the Senate, then ratified by the legislatures of three-quarters of the states.

    Why did the country go to all that trouble if Congress could simply have declared alcohol a "controlled substance" and made it legal or illegal with a simple majority vote and a presidential signature?

    If marijuana is grown, distributed and consumed within state borders, and the state government decides that under some circumstances that is not a crime, by what authority does Congress override that judgment? Why is marijuana in 2003 different than alcohol in 1919?

    The Supreme Court ruled recently that the federal Controlled Substances Act does not contain an exception for medical necessity. Lawyers for the Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Cooperative argued that, exception or no exception, the Controlled Substances Act "exceeds Congress' Commerce Clause powers" and infringes the "fundamental liberties of the people under the Fifth, Ninth, and Tenth Amendments."

    The Supreme Court did not want to talk about it.

    "Because the Court of Appeals did not address these claims," Justice Clarence Thomas wrote, "we decline to do so in the first instance."

    The Court may not be able to duck the issue much longer. If the people of each state choose to decriminalize marijuana in some circumstances, the Constitution plainly reserves to them the power to do so.


    NewsHawk: User: http://www.420magazine.com/
    Source: extremeink.com
    Author: Susan Shelley
    Copyright: 2009 extremeink.com
    Contact: http://www.extremeink.com
    Website: http://www.extremeink.com/susan/prohibit.htm
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    Member of the Month: 3rd Place Winner BWC BayArea's Avatar
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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    Quote Originally Posted by User View Post
    Marijuana, Prohibition and the Tenth Amendment
    By Susan Shelley
    Why is marijuana in 2003 different than alcohol in 1919?


    NewsHawk: User: http://www.420magazine.com/
    Source: extremeink.com
    Author: Susan Shelley
    Copyright: 2009 extremeink.com
    Contact: http://www.extremeink.com'
    Website: "Marijuana, Prohibition and the Tenth Amendment" by Susan Shelley, author of "The 37th Amendment: A Novel"
    This doesn't appear to be a helpful question for proponents because for obvious reasons beknownst to faithful members and guests alike. Hope U have a damn good premeditated rebuttal to an opponents' response to that.

  4. #4
    Cannabis Connoisseur Jim Behr's Avatar
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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    ^
    Hope U have a damn good premeditated rebuttal to an opponents' response to that.
    first thing to pop into my head was marijuana doesn't kill people, 1919, 1933, 2009, doesn't matter, marijuana doesn't kill people
    Last edited by Jim Behr; 09-14-2009 at 12:39 PM.
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    420 Member Medifreddie's Avatar
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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    User - Using the posted link, I visited the 10th Amendment website. Lots going on there for sure. Just wanted to comment on a few things in your post.

    {Sooner or later the question will have to be asked: Does the federal government have the power under the Constitution to stop cities and states from legalizing marijuana?}

    We have been asking this question since Prop 215 (California) was first brought about in the 90's. The amount of still remaining legal gray areas would be funny if it werent for the medical patients caught in the middle of the state vs the Feds power struggle. It's not a matter of questions and answers, we're pretty much past that. It's a simple matter of, we the people are speaking and rather than listen and act upon our wishes, the government is doing what it believes is best for us which is scary in itself...

    {Why is marijuana in 2003 different than alcohol in 1919?}

    2003? How about 2009? We have seen a lot of changes and gained a lot of ground since 2003, therefore including "to date" makes a better case for a debate. The biggest difference I see in the 1919/2003 question is in 1919 the people trusted their government more and werent as aware of their basic constitutional rights and lacked the resources to mount a reasonable disagreeance if so inclined. We of present day look back to the days of Prohibition and think, "Jesus, our government sure blew it on that one", but if you lived in the time and you wanted a snort or two, you just figured out ways around it. Remember, even Miranda wasnt around in those days.

    One last thought. In my opinion, the medical marijuana passage has worked somewhat to our disfavor. Unlike the Prohibition debacle where alcohol had no real medicinal benefits other than getting so inebriated you couldnt feel any pain, the marijuana movement gained a foothold by legalization as medicine. Ponder this: If I know you want a whole pie but you will go away if I only give you a slice, I'm only going to give you a slice. In the same, if I know you want to legalize marijuana as a recreational substance, I might go as far as legalizing it as a medicine/drug, and in doing so, lay a foundation for down the road when I say to you, "Sorry, it's been legalized as a drug. How can it also be used for recreational purposes at the same time? Next please!" I'm not saying it went down this way but if we learned anything from grassy knolls.....peace n good luck MF
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    Member of the Month: 3rd Place Winner BWC BayArea's Avatar
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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    MedFred, nice post. I like how u express ur sentiments. I was thinking more along the lines of neutralizing the potency arguements like "this ain't ur Woodstock pot any more" or "isn't it almost like hard drugs with all the hydroponics and chemicals".These are popular refutations from the largely uneducated masses.

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    Re: Time to Put Down the Labels

    The potency is not an issue. It could be 100% THC and it will not kill you. Higher potent medicine means I only need a quick puff or vape to get the pain relief I need. It would also mean less harmful effects in th long run. This is a red herring issue. If I had high grade hash, I know I would not be stupid and use large amounts, I would make it last. That is how you deal with the issue of higher potency.
    Michael

    Make Hemp History; End prohibition NOW!