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Anslinger And Mellon Connection

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Jim Finnel

Fallen Cannabis Warrior & Ex News Moderator
One man who first spread myths about marijuana was Harry J. Anslinger, who was appointed director of the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (predecessor of the Drug Enforcement Agency or DEA of today). He was a man who hated jazz music and tried to get jazz musicians herded into prison for smoking marijuana. Anslinger hated marijuana even more. At first, he declared marijuana caused users to go crazy and commit violent crime. As a result of his testimony, persons who used pot could use the insanity defense to get a lesser charge of murder. Later on, after doctors testified at a second hearing regarding marijuana, Anslinger recanted his earlier testimony, conceding that marijuana probably didn´t cause insanity or violent behavior, but added that it could lead to opi*m use.

This is how the gateway myth originated.

In 1931, Anslinger got his job at the Bureau of Narcotics at the recommendation of a man named Richard Mellon, who happened to be his wife's uncle. Mellon, also director of the Mellon Bank, was U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. Richard along with sister Sarah and brother R.K. inherited Mellon Financial Corporation from their father Thomas Mellon in 1902. Richard invested in major stock holdings such as Gulf Oil and Alcoa and associated with wealthy men such as William R. Hearst, Sr. and the DuPont brothers. Hearst owned a chain of newspapers across the U.S. as well as a large lumber company. The DuPont family had just patented a paper making process using wood pulp some years earlier. As well,they had a new invention, a kind of synthetic cotton called nylon.Unfortunately, the infant hemp industry seemed to threaten these rich men's monopoly in the pulp and paper industry. In fact, in 1937, Popular Science predicted that hemp would become a billion dollar industry. Dupont and Hearst (friends and business companions) feared this of course with hemp being able to accomplish much more than paper and paint. Since then, marijuana has endured a smear campaign originally instigated by Hearst's newspapers and imitated by other newspaper chains around the world.

After hemp was banned in 1938, DuPont came out with nylon. It licensed out the paper making process to Hearst so that wood-pulp could be easily made into cheap paper. Meanwhile, the anti-pot propaganda demonized marijuana whilst the alcohol and tobacco companies enjoyed wide advertising in the newspapers and on TV, especially in the post-war boom that followed the war. Today, both alcohol and tobacco consumption is dropping, due to education about the dangers of their use. Marijuana consumption peaked about twelve years ago, but is now on the rise, especially among today's youth. This is in spite of anti-pot propaganda. New studies have completely overturned the gateway myth surrounding marijuana and indicate that marijuana is far less harmful than alcohol or cigarettes.

A possible reason why the U.S. seeks to control international drug policy may have to do with the economic potential cannabis hemp represents. A single nation with the right tools and the land can grow hemp and supply raw material for paper making and textiles, as well as replacements and substitutes for petrochemicals. Economic sustainability is possible with hemp more so than with trees. Hemp produces 4.3 times more pulp fiber per hectare. Hemp paper products can be recycled seven times while paper made from wood-pulp can only be recycled three times. Hemp seed protein is very nutritious. Fiberboard made from hemp fiber is stronger than that made from wood-chips. Thus, a cannabis hemp industry can revitalize any country that starts one up, if the capital is there.

References:

The American Magazine, July 1937

Statement to Narcotics Commission, 1937

20 years of narcotics Control under United Nations, January, 1966

DuPont and Manhattan Project, 1943

Randolf Hearst, Biography, 1863-1951


News Hawk: User: 420 MAGAZINE ® - Medical Marijuana Publication & Social Networking
Source: American Chronicle
Copyright: 2008 American Chronicle
Contact: Americanchronicle.com
Website: American Chronicle | Anslinger and Mellon Connection
 

wm97

New Member
There is another point of view at Was there a conspiracy to outlaw hemp?

This is an interesting tale, but it has a lot of problems. For one thing, it doesn't explain why marijuana was already illegal in 30 states before Anslinger was appointed to the FBN.

For another, nylon is NOT a competitor to hemp. No woman was going to buy hemp stockings to flatter her legs. Besides, nylon is basically impervious to water and deterioration. Hemp, while quite durable, is not. They have two entirely different sets of uses so there would be a big market for nylon, even if hemp was grown on every farm in the US.

Besides, there was no rational reason for the DuPonts to consider hemp a threat. It was a rapidly declining crop at the time, and even the stuff that was harvested sat in the warehouses for years simply because there weren't any buyers.

The idea that it was an "infant" industry, as stated in the article, is completely wrong. It had been grown widely throughout the US from earliest times. One of its primary uses was as sails in sailing ships. However, with the demise of the sailing ship and the rise of the steam ship, that use went away and the planting of the crop began to decline. In addition, it began to be grown more overseas, because of the amount of labor it requires. By the time the Marihuana Tax Act was passed, the crop was so insignificant that even the farmers who grew it agreed that they wouldn't much miss it if it was outlawed. see their testimony at The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

Besides that, nylon and other synthetics were a minor line of income to the DuPonts, anyway. They made their major fortune from selling explosives and they were selling a lot of those in the days before WWII.

There are other reasons to doubt the story, too. See the link provided.
 

tintala

Plant of the Month: Third Place Winner
There is another point of view at Was there a conspiracy to outlaw hemp?

This is an interesting tale, but it has a lot of problems. For one thing, it doesn't explain why marijuana was already illegal in 30 states before Anslinger was appointed to the FBN.

For another, nylon is NOT a competitor to hemp. No woman was going to buy hemp stockings to flatter her legs. Besides, nylon is basically impervious to water and deterioration. Hemp, while quite durable, is not. They have two entirely different sets of uses so there would be a big market for nylon, even if hemp was grown on every farm in the US.

Besides, there was no rational reason for the DuPonts to consider hemp a threat. It was a rapidly declining crop at the time, and even the stuff that was harvested sat in the warehouses for years simply because there weren't any buyers.

The idea that it was an "infant" industry, as stated in the article, is completely wrong. It had been grown widely throughout the US from earliest times. One of its primary uses was as sails in sailing ships. However, with the demise of the sailing ship and the rise of the steam ship, that use went away and the planting of the crop began to decline. In addition, it began to be grown more overseas, because of the amount of labor it requires. By the time the Marihuana Tax Act was passed, the crop was so insignificant that even the farmers who grew it agreed that they wouldn't much miss it if it was outlawed. see their testimony at The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

Besides that, nylon and other synthetics were a minor line of income to the DuPonts, anyway. They made their major fortune from selling explosives and they were selling a lot of those in the days before WWII.

There are other reasons to doubt the story, too. See the link provided.
are you saying this article is wrong or the link you posted?
To ad to this i have copied another post here at 420:

When the new hemp ventures began to emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry in 1935, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics launched its final assault against marihuana.The sudden move on the part of the Bureau to demonize marihuana was indicative of the pattern of behavior which had been set before 1935, with regard to the development of farm wastes as an alternative source for the production of paper.In the fight against alternative sources, the International Paper and Power Company was a leader. Interestingly, this company was financially linked to J. P. Morgan & Company.[219] It is important to note, that Du Pont was also financially linked to this powerful bank.Du Pont was a participant in the wood pulp industry as the primary supplier of the chemicals necessary for pulping.In addition to this interest, Du Pont had also cornered the market on the synthetic fibers and plastics made from cellulose derived from wood pulp.[220] Furthermore, Du Pont was interested in the development of the Southern Pine as raw material source for its cellulose industries.[221] Likewise, the International Paper Company, which had been reformed as a result of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act of 1935, also expanded its operations into the Southern region, especially from 1935 on, in anticipation of utilizing the Southern Pine.

Du Pont and International were not alone in the migration as other large corporations entered the emerging Southern forest products industry.[222] For instance, the St. Regis Paper Company another Morgan interest, as well as the Great Northern Paper Company and the Champion Paper Company, which were within Chase Manhattan's sphere of influence, also migrated southward. By 1935, the success of the Southern Pine as a new source of wood pulp was quickly becoming the responsibility of the federal government and the financial institutions which supported the movement, and eventually provided the capital to develop the industry. To give an idea of this new responsibility, one estimate predicted an investment of $500,000,000 would be necessary for the development of the Southern wood pulp industry.[223] A simple cursory glance at the history of the government and these financial institutions prior to 1935, reveals that both had consistently adopted conciliatory strategies to protect and further their interests. Incidentally, the Southern forest products industry faced a serious economic challenge from the nascent movement to utilize hemp as alternative source for the production of raw cellulose.

The previous observation raises speculation about collusion between the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and concerned industrial leaders. Commissioner Anslinger had been appointed to his post by his future uncle-in-law Andrew Mellon, who at the time had been the Secretary of the Treasury.In addition to serving as the Secretary of the Treasury, Andrew Mellon along with his brother controlled the Mellon Bank which was financially linked with J. P. Morgan & Company.[224] On a more personal level both Mellon brothers were a privileged members of J. P. Morgan & Company's "preferred list."This list was composed of corporate directors, government officials, and the heads of the nations largest banks.As a group, these preferred clients were kept informed on all aspects of the economy from which they shamelessly profited.

Among this privileged financial caste were individuals directly associated with International Paper, Du Pont, and other corporations financially interested in the development of the wood pulp industry and its expansion in the South.Hemp was undoubtedly unwelcome competition.Was it mere coincidence that the Bureau's position toward marihuana abruptly changed in 1935, when Commissioner Anslinger became aware of the surge of activity to develop hemp for the production of cellulose pulp? Or was the final assault against marihuana precluded by hidden motives stemming from the industrial and governmental endorsement of plans to develop the Southern Pine as a new source of cellulose pulp?

Certainly, there is reason to continue the inquiry.During the final assault, the Bureau redoubled its efforts to demonize marihuana. Its task was greatly facilitated by the fact that the media, and various morality groups, as well as bureaucrats and legislators were easily influenced by the financial institutions which controlled all facets of the wood pulp industry.[225] This situation is best reflected in the phenomenal cooperative effort exhibited by the government and private concerns to the develop the Southern Pine industry. The campaign against marihuana was an extra protective measure to ensure the success of the project.Initially, the Bureau's intense demonization of marihuana had the effect of seriously diminishing investment capital flowing into the development of the hemp industry.The following example serves to demonstrate the ramifications of this dilemma.

___________________________________________________
in short: DUPONT and ANDREW MELLON DID see hemp as a competitor as the paper/pulp industry was in dire threat from hemp, ANDREW MELLON at his paper mill came up with a way to bleach wood pulp paper, so obviously they didnt want hemp paper ... also When BEN Franklin grew hemp for his paper mill, there was a huge conspiracy with the politicians and paper mills, only politicians printed newspapers back then and one of these was BEN who grew hemp for his mill. WHen nylon came out, no one ever knew what it was, so how the heck is a women gona want nylon stockings if it wasnt even a concept? THE LADIES WORE WOOL AND SILK STOCKING THEN ANYWAY, not nylon.

"Gradually by the late 1800's the use of wool gave way to cotton, and by 1929 the vast majority of stocking production was in silk. Then at Du Pont laboratories came Dr Wallace Carrothers momentous discovery - nylon! Carrothers was a brilliant polymer chemist with a rather turbulent private life that led to fits of depression. Nevertheless his development of what was initially known as polyamide 6-6 with its extremely high melting point revolutionized women's lives!"
 

wm97

New Member
are you saying this article is wrong or the link you posted?
To ad to this i have copied another post here at 420:

When the new hemp ventures began to emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry in 1935, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics launched its final assault against marihuana.The sudden move on the part of the Bureau to demonize marihuana was indicative of the pattern of behavior which had been set before 1935, with regard to the development of farm wastes as an alternative source for the production of paper.In the fight against alternative sources, the International Paper and Power Company was a leader. Interestingly, this company was financially linked to J. P. Morgan & Company.[219] It is important to note, that Du Pont was also financially linked to this powerful bank.Du Pont was a participant in the wood pulp industry as the primary supplier of the chemicals necessary for pulping.In addition to this interest, Du Pont had also cornered the market on the synthetic fibers and plastics made from cellulose derived from wood pulp.[220] Furthermore, Du Pont was interested in the development of the Southern Pine as raw material source for its cellulose industries.[221] Likewise, the International Paper Company, which had been reformed as a result of the Public Utilities Holding Company Act of 1935, also expanded its operations into the Southern region, especially from 1935 on, in anticipation of utilizing the Southern Pine.

Du Pont and International were not alone in the migration as other large corporations entered the emerging Southern forest products industry.[222] For instance, the St. Regis Paper Company another Morgan interest, as well as the Great Northern Paper Company and the Champion Paper Company, which were within Chase Manhattan's sphere of influence, also migrated southward. By 1935, the success of the Southern Pine as a new source of wood pulp was quickly becoming the responsibility of the federal government and the financial institutions which supported the movement, and eventually provided the capital to develop the industry. To give an idea of this new responsibility, one estimate predicted an investment of $500,000,000 would be necessary for the development of the Southern wood pulp industry.[223] A simple cursory glance at the history of the government and these financial institutions prior to 1935, reveals that both had consistently adopted conciliatory strategies to protect and further their interests. Incidentally, the Southern forest products industry faced a serious economic challenge from the nascent movement to utilize hemp as alternative source for the production of raw cellulose.

The previous observation raises speculation about collusion between the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and concerned industrial leaders. Commissioner Anslinger had been appointed to his post by his future uncle-in-law Andrew Mellon, who at the time had been the Secretary of the Treasury.In addition to serving as the Secretary of the Treasury, Andrew Mellon along with his brother controlled the Mellon Bank which was financially linked with J. P. Morgan & Company.[224] On a more personal level both Mellon brothers were a privileged members of J. P. Morgan & Company's "preferred list."This list was composed of corporate directors, government officials, and the heads of the nations largest banks.As a group, these preferred clients were kept informed on all aspects of the economy from which they shamelessly profited.

Among this privileged financial caste were individuals directly associated with International Paper, Du Pont, and other corporations financially interested in the development of the wood pulp industry and its expansion in the South.Hemp was undoubtedly unwelcome competition.Was it mere coincidence that the Bureau's position toward marihuana abruptly changed in 1935, when Commissioner Anslinger became aware of the surge of activity to develop hemp for the production of cellulose pulp? Or was the final assault against marihuana precluded by hidden motives stemming from the industrial and governmental endorsement of plans to develop the Southern Pine as a new source of cellulose pulp?

Certainly, there is reason to continue the inquiry.During the final assault, the Bureau redoubled its efforts to demonize marihuana. Its task was greatly facilitated by the fact that the media, and various morality groups, as well as bureaucrats and legislators were easily influenced by the financial institutions which controlled all facets of the wood pulp industry.[225] This situation is best reflected in the phenomenal cooperative effort exhibited by the government and private concerns to the develop the Southern Pine industry. The campaign against marihuana was an extra protective measure to ensure the success of the project.Initially, the Bureau's intense demonization of marihuana had the effect of seriously diminishing investment capital flowing into the development of the hemp industry.The following example serves to demonstrate the ramifications of this dilemma.

___________________________________________________
in short: DUPONT and ANDREW MELLON DID see hemp as a competitor as the paper/pulp industry was in dire threat from hemp, ANDREW MELLON at his paper mill came up with a way to bleach wood pulp paper, so obviously they didnt want hemp paper ... also When BEN Franklin grew hemp for his paper mill, there was a huge conspiracy with the politicians and paper mills, only politicians printed newspapers back then and one of these was BEN who grew hemp for his mill. WHen nylon came out, no one ever knew what it was, so how the heck is a women gona want nylon stockings if it wasnt even a concept? THE LADIES WORE WOOL AND SILK STOCKING THEN ANYWAY, not nylon.

"Gradually by the late 1800's the use of wool gave way to cotton, and by 1929 the vast majority of stocking production was in silk. Then at Du Pont laboratories came Dr Wallace Carrothers momentous discovery - nylon! Carrothers was a brilliant polymer chemist with a rather turbulent private life that led to fits of depression. Nevertheless his development of what was initially known as polyamide 6-6 with its extremely high melting point revolutionized women's lives!"
I am saying that the original article posted here is wrong. As for the piece you quoted, I am aware of it. In fact, I am the person who originally posted it on the web.

Now for the problems with what you posted above.

1) When the new hemp ventures began to emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry in 1935,

First of all, the hemp industry did not emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry, for a lot of reasons. It was a rapidly fading crop at the time with no sign of any rebound. It had been promoted by some people (primarily the people selling the power decorticator) as the answer to the farmers' problems during the Depression so a number of farmers went out and grew it. In short, their attempts were a disaster. The power decorticator broke, they had big problems harvesting, and the harvested hemp sat in the warehouses for years because there were no buyers. See the REPORT OF SURVEY COMMERCIALIZED HEMP (1934-35 CROP) in the STATE OF MINNESOTA at Report of Survey Commercialized Hemp Crop (1934-35 Crop) in the State of Minnesota

Furthermore, the crop was fading so fast at the time that even the farmers who grew it agreed that they wouldn't miss it if it was outlawed. It simply wasn't that important to them. See the statements of

Statement of Matt Rens, Representing Rens Hemp Co., Brandon, Wis.
Statement of Mr. Moksnes, Superintendent of the Amhempco Corporation, Danville, Ill.
Statement of Royal C. Johnson, Attorney, Washington, D.C., Representing Chempsco, Inc. of Winona, Minn, and Hemp Chemical Corporation of Mankato, Minn.
Statement of O.C. Olman, Representing Juneau Fibre Co., Juneau, Wis.

at The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937


2) The fact that they were buying up pine forests to make paper proves nothing about hemp. Interesting, but proves nothing. They had any number of reasons to do it.

3) It is difficult to understand why hemp would be a threat to the DuPont empire or any other. In the first place, the DuPont empire was built on explosives, not this stuff. In the second place, if DuPont was looking for cellulose as an ingredient in their products, it makes no difference to them where the cellulose comes from. As a producer of cellulose, hemp is good but not the best. For work required to harvest and process the cellulose, hemp is more work than a lot of other plants. (Which is why the biofuel people are now growing switchgrass instead of hemp -- switch grass also grows fast but is a lot easier to harvest.


As for your comments;

1) in short: DUPONT and ANDREW MELLON DID see hemp as a competitor as the paper/pulp industry was in dire threat from hemp,

There simply is no evidence of that. Look at the hemp crop production figures and the testimony of the hemp farmers themselves.

2) ANDREW MELLON at his paper mill came up with a way to bleach wood pulp paper, so obviously they didnt want hemp paper ...

I am sorry, that is no so obvious to me. It seems to me that the cheapest way to produce paper is what they would go for, and that there wouldn't have been enough hemp to process to supply the paper needs even if they had chosen hemp.


3) also When BEN Franklin grew hemp for his paper mill, there was a huge conspiracy with the politicians and paper mills, only politicians printed newspapers back then and one of these was BEN who grew hemp for his mill.


There was a huge hemp conspiracy during BF's day? This is the first I have heard of that. Hemp was grown widely at the time -being the major crop at Mount Vernon, among other things -- so the idea of a hemp conspiracy in BF's time sounds just a little silly to me.

4) WHen nylon came out, no one ever knew what it was, so how the heck is a women gona want nylon stockings if it wasnt even a concept? THE LADIES WORE WOOL AND SILK STOCKING THEN ANYWAY, not nylon.

I guess you aren't up on the history of the 1930s and 1940s. When nylon stockings came out, they were all the rage and an enterprising young man could get himself thoroughly laid for a pair of nylon stockings. They continued to be a major product for decades. See any old WWII movie. Many of them mention the value of nylon stockings to ladies at the time.

Those eventually became "pantyhose", which, if you are young, may be your only recollection of the thing. Note that hemp would not be a good starting point to make pantyhose.

But, in any event, nylon is not a competitive product to hemp so there was no reason for DuPont to think that it was a threat to his explosives empire.
 

tintala

Plant of the Month: Third Place Winner
I am saying that the original article posted here is wrong. As for the piece you quoted, I am aware of it. In fact, I am the person who originally posted it on the web.

Now for the problems with what you posted above.

1) When the new hemp ventures began to emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry in 1935,

First of all, the hemp industry did not emerge as a real threat to the wood pulp paper industry, for a lot of reasons. It was a rapidly fading crop at the time with no sign of any rebound. It had been promoted by some people (primarily the people selling the power decorticator) as the answer to the farmers' problems during the Depression so a number of farmers went out and grew it. In short, their attempts were a disaster. The power decorticator broke, they had big problems harvesting, and the harvested hemp sat in the warehouses for years because there were no buyers. See the REPORT OF SURVEY COMMERCIALIZED HEMP (1934-35 CROP) in the STATE OF MINNESOTA at Report of Survey Commercialized Hemp Crop (1934-35 Crop) in the State of Minnesota

Furthermore, the crop was fading so fast at the time that even the farmers who grew it agreed that they wouldn't miss it if it was outlawed. It simply wasn't that important to them. See the statements of

Statement of Matt Rens, Representing Rens Hemp Co., Brandon, Wis.
Statement of Mr. Moksnes, Superintendent of the Amhempco Corporation, Danville, Ill.
Statement of Royal C. Johnson, Attorney, Washington, D.C., Representing Chempsco, Inc. of Winona, Minn, and Hemp Chemical Corporation of Mankato, Minn.
Statement of O.C. Olman, Representing Juneau Fibre Co., Juneau, Wis.

at The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937


2) The fact that they were buying up pine forests to make paper proves nothing about hemp. Interesting, but proves nothing. They had any number of reasons to do it.

3) It is difficult to understand why hemp would be a threat to the DuPont empire or any other. In the first place, the DuPont empire was built on explosives, not this stuff. In the second place, if DuPont was looking for cellulose as an ingredient in their products, it makes no difference to them where the cellulose comes from. As a producer of cellulose, hemp is good but not the best. For work required to harvest and process the cellulose, hemp is more work than a lot of other plants. (Which is why the biofuel people are now growing switchgrass instead of hemp -- switch grass also grows fast but is a lot easier to harvest.


As for your comments;

1) in short: DUPONT and ANDREW MELLON DID see hemp as a competitor as the paper/pulp industry was in dire threat from hemp,

There simply is no evidence of that. Look at the hemp crop production figures and the testimony of the hemp farmers themselves.

2) ANDREW MELLON at his paper mill came up with a way to bleach wood pulp paper, so obviously they didnt want hemp paper ...

I am sorry, that is no so obvious to me. It seems to me that the cheapest way to produce paper is what they would go for, and that there wouldn't have been enough hemp to process to supply the paper needs even if they had chosen hemp.


3) also When BEN Franklin grew hemp for his paper mill, there was a huge conspiracy with the politicians and paper mills, only politicians printed newspapers back then and one of these was BEN who grew hemp for his mill.


There was a huge hemp conspiracy during BF's day? This is the first I have heard of that. Hemp was grown widely at the time -being the major crop at Mount Vernon, among other things -- so the idea of a hemp conspiracy in BF's time sounds just a little silly to me.

4) WHen nylon came out, no one ever knew what it was, so how the heck is a women gona want nylon stockings if it wasnt even a concept? THE LADIES WORE WOOL AND SILK STOCKING THEN ANYWAY, not nylon.

I guess you aren't up on the history of the 1930s and 1940s. When nylon stockings came out, they were all the rage and an enterprising young man could get himself thoroughly laid for a pair of nylon stockings. They continued to be a major product for decades. See any old WWII movie. Many of them mention the value of nylon stockings to ladies at the time.

Those eventually became "pantyhose", which, if you are young, may be your only recollection of the thing. Note that hemp would not be a good starting point to make pantyhose.

But, in any event, nylon is not a competitive product to hemp so there was no reason for DuPont to think that it was a threat to his explosives empire.
a little bit of research would allow you to see the points and history of hemp grown in the usa in PRE- USA days, just because you havent heard about BEN's farming and paper mill and the conspiracy doesn't mean it's silly. You should try researching womens stockings too, as I did. Then you would have a better understanding of my post as it pertains to Nylon and dupont. thank you.

It's obvious you disagree with JACK HERER THE EMPORER WEARS NO CLOTHES< he interviewed the company at DUPONT to get these responses.
 
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wm97

New Member
a little bit of research would allow you to see the points and history of hemp grown in the usa in PRE- USA days, just because you havent heard about BEN's farming and paper mill and the conspiracy doesn't mean it's silly.
I have the largest online collection of historical research on the subject. You wouldn't even know about the documents you referenced if I had not posted them on the web.

As for Ben, hemp was grown throughout the colonies in the early days. You are the first person I have heard mention the idea that there was some conspiracy back then. If you think there is evidence of a conspiracy in BF's day, then it would be up to you to bring the news to the world and prove it.

But maybe you could also explain what that has to do with the supposed conspiracy in the 30s. You didn't think Ben was still hanging around promoting conspiracies, did you?

You should try researching womens stockings too, as I did. Then you would have a better understanding of my post as it pertains to Nylon and dupont. thank you.
Actually, I am old enough that I was there when the women were wearing those stockings.

My statement stands that nylon and hemp are not competitive products. If you have some evidence to the contrary, then let's see it. But so far you haven't show any such thing.

It's obvious you disagree with JACK HERER THE EMPORER WEARS NO CLOTHES< he interviewed the company at DUPONT to get these responses , he didn't nor I either , PULLED this stuff out of our ARSES!!!!
What responses did he get from DuPont? The paper you quoted wasn't written by Jack.


Now if you have any actual documentation that I haven't seen already, then send it along to me and I will post it with the rest in the world's largest online collection of such research.

Let me guess -- you never even bothered to look at what I have, did you? It never occurred to you that you were quoting documents first posted by me, did it?
 
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wm97

New Member
And BTW, tintala, I have known both Jack and his co-author Chris Conrad, for about twenty years now. I have appeared many times with them and I consider them both good friends. I think Jack tells a good story and did a lot of good work, but I think he overstates the case.

Now if you want to read the report on the hemp crop of 1934-35 and tell me how that translates to a threat to people who made their primary fortune in the explosives industry, then we can have a reasonable discussion.
 
In 1931, Anslinger got his job at the Bureau of Narcotics at the recommendation of a man named Richard Mellon, who happened to be his wife's uncle. Mellon, also director of the Mellon Bank, was U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. Richard along with sister Sarah and brother R.K. inherited Mellon Financial Corporation from their father Thomas Mellon in 1902.
I don't think so. First, it was Andrew Mellon who was head of US Treasury, not Richard. There was a Richard King Mellon who had a sister Sarah and was the grandson (not son) of Thomas. He was Andrew's nephew. Mellon family - Wikipedia

Anslinger was married to the former Martha Denniston (1886-1961). There are no Dennistons in the Mellon family tree, but Harry Alexander Laughlin (1838-1922), son of James Laughlin of Jones & Laughlin Steel Co., married an Alice B. Denniston on 9/10/1860.

Margaret Mellon (1901—1998) was married to an Alexander Laughlin Jr. on 6/21/1924. Attending the wedding were both sitting Secretary of the Treasury Andrew Mellon and Miss Alice Denniston Laughlin, "wearing a frock of gold crepe and a hat of brown straw," along with her grandmother Mrs. James B. Laughlin (the former Alice B. Denniston), "in white crepe with satin thread embroidery and a hat of orchid straw," according to the Pittsburgh Daily Post. (Orchid was the official color scheme of the wedding so this puts Mrs. Laughlin squarely in the wedding party.) So Anslinger apparently married into Pittsburgh society, but not directly into the Mellon family.

I don't see where Richard Mellon comes into it.