420 Magazine Background

Bill would help clear up confusion over marijuana dispensaries laws

mcwow

New Member
The bill before state lawmakers would create a voluntary registry of medical marijuana patients -- one that would protect them from search and arrest.

SEATTLE --At least 35 medical marijuana dispensaries have been shut down or received warning notices since February. But still, there are others that are still operating, and right now, lawmakers are trying to clear up the confusion when it comes to their legality.

Cass Stewart's medical marijuana collective just opened its doors two weeks ago, and already business is booming.

"The apothecary is a safe and legal place for qualified patients," Stewart said.

But this place isn't for just anyone.

"We have cancer patients, MS patients, chronic pain patients," Stewart said.

Based on the state law that was passed, qualified patients must have the proper identification and documentation. But state law is also unclear about how dispensaries operate.

Recently the city of Tacoma sent letters to 21 dispensaries stating they were illegal and they'd have to turn over their business licenses. The city agreed to delay further action until lawmakers weigh in.

Congressman Dave Reichert, a former sheriff who for 30 years could not catch the Green River killer, and whose own mother uses cannabis to ease her cancer, doesn't buy the argument for legalization.

"I know there's an argument -- no it's not an entry drug," he said. "I have unfortunately seen too much of that in my past career where it has indeed led to young people entering into another drug world."
Mr. Reichert, this is because of prohibition; because many "drug dealers" who sell pot illegally also sell other drugs, and when buyers are buying pot illegally they are exposed to these other drugs. The end of Prohibition would put the illegal drug dealers out of business.
The bill before state lawmakers would create a voluntary registry of medical marijuana patients -- one that would protect them from search and arrest. It would also legalize and regulate dispensaries, adding much-needed clarification to an already gray law.
I wonder about trusting the government....
"There's obviously a lot of questions out there that need to be answered, and it needs to be answered for people in the industry that want to be in this environment and work here," Stewart said.

Despite other dispensaries facing an uncertain future, Cass believes when the smoke clears, he'll still be around.

The bill is making its way through the legislature. The State Senate already authorized it and it was passed through a House committee Thursday.
 
Top Bottom