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Briefbriefs Soil Zamaldelica Express: Grow Journal, 2020

briefbriefs

Active Member
Day 25:
Today’s mantra is: “From failing, you learn. From success — not so much.”

And lord, am I learning.

my little Greta has been struggling with clawing leaves and more of those bizarre lesions to her lower leaves. I’ve ruled out leaf miner bugs because their key indicators are haphazard lines all across your leaf, and these are always just spots always a similar size and shape. I have no idea what it might be yet. Perhaps a deficiency or even wind burn from having the fans (on super low) constantly blowing.

The clawing I thought was nitrogen toxicity may not be... as my leaves are all a fairly lime green — not that dark green that often comes with nitrogen excess. Again — the jury is still very much out on what it might be.

I’ve been trying very hard not to overwater and this morning I woke up to a VERY CRISPY and stressed plant. Like holy fuck.

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Anyway, I finally watered her (till runoff) and included a .5ml of grow and .5ml of bloom, Floralicious Plus (.1ml), calmag plus (3ml), and a serving of Recharge...now she’s looking MUCH better and praying straight into the light. Her leaves are still clawing and I’m still concerned about those weird blotches on her leaves (some of the older blotches are now yellowing and crispy), but at least she’s responding well to the watering.

On a different note, it looks like she’s entering her beginning of flower! That’s exciting!!

Ive given up on the hopes that she’ll give me a good yield, but I’m still aiming to have her look as healthy and happy as possible by the time harvest rolls around.
 

HashFart

Nug of the Month: Jan 2021 - Photo of the Month: Aug 2021
Hello briefbriefs. I was told by a grow master sorry can't remember Wich one about a thing called a slurry test I think it was called it involved mixing your soil and water you use to feed in a bottle then checking ph , idk if this will help but very cool , I think different nutrients get absorbed at different ph maybe something to look into
 

briefbriefs

Active Member
Hello briefbriefs. I was told by a grow master sorry can't remember Wich one about a thing called a slurry test I think it was called it involved mixing your soil and water you use to feed in a bottle then checking ph , idk if this will help but very cool , I think different nutrients get absorbed at different ph maybe something to look into

thats a good idea, i was thinking of doing that during the next watering!
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020, Aug 2021
At this point, the base pH of your soil is a given, and to try to adjust it somehow mid grow is almost always folly. A slurry test is meaningless to you now, the time for that was when you were first planning to use that soil. Never fear, If you have a typical potting soil its base pH is somewhere up on the high end of the 6.2-6.8 pH range known to be the most effective in soil. All you have to do is water at the low end of the scale and the soil will go into action, slowly drifting your pH through the entire range. Water at 6.3 pH every time, whether it is a water mixed with nutes pass or a water only pass, adjust to 6.3 pH and the soil will take care of things for you.
 

briefbriefs

Active Member
At this point, the base pH of your soil is a given, and to try to adjust it somehow mid grow is almost always folly. A slurry test is meaningless to you now, the time for that was when you were first planning to use that soil. Never fear, If you have a typical potting soil its base pH is somewhere up on the high end of the 6.2-6.8 pH range known to be the most effective in soil. All you have to do is water at the low end of the scale and the soil will go into action, slowly drifting your pH through the entire range. Water at 6.3 pH every time, whether it is a water mixed with nutes pass or a water only pass, adjust to 6.3 pH and the soil will take care of things for you.

yeah, i found out way too late that Fox Farms Ocean Forest has a pH of 7.2 -- and i believe my main mistake was layering the soils (1/3 top Happy Frog which is 6.3-6.8 like you said, bottom 2/3rds Ocean Forest) instead of mixing them. I think its caused my soil's pH to get all outta wack. Perhaps im talking out of my butt tho. Anyway, if your recommendation is not to do a slurry test/potentially flush to adjust pH -- but instead to just keep watering at 6.3 (which i've been doing at every feeding, yay!) then i defer to you and your experience. I'll just keep on keepin on!
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020, Aug 2021
Whomever in your world that is advising you to flush your soil to adjust its pH... fire them. Next time, try using HF for your young plants and then when you move to the larger containers, fill them with OF. Put some super soil in the bottom third of these containers, and you are will on your way to an organic grow.
 

briefbriefs

Active Member
Whomever in your world that is advising you to flush your soil to adjust its pH... fire them. Next time, try using HF for your young plants and then when you move to the larger containers, fill them with OF. Put some super soil in the bottom third of these containers, and you are will on your way to an organic grow.

In your experience with autoflowers (i know, i know...) when is a plant no longer considered "young"? Also, which side of the argument do you fall on regarding autoflower transplant vs no transplant?
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020, Aug 2021
I consider node 3 to be the start of mid veg... no longer a young plant. This is highly subjective however, and not all will agree. Uppotting is done scientifically if done correctly, by judging the root mass in the container based on water usage. The goal of successive uppotting is just that, to develop the strongest roots you can at each stage.

I believe a lot of what you have heard about Autos to be marketing hype. Autos are a hybrid of an inferior ruderalis plant and a bred genetic line of sativa or indica, and genetically have to be smaller and less potent than its photoperiod cousin. I never thought the idea of Autos would catch on, but they did. They were marketed well, and now the entire world believes that Autos are some sort of super plant, that uses less nutes, doesn't like to be uppotted and because of that, it is easier to grow. Combine that with no need to worry about light patterns and the quickness of the whole abbreviated plant, and the idea caught on.

My belief is that despite the hype, they are still just plants. They move at a fast pace, so you definitely don't want to have problems with them that might stunt them for a precious day or two, but they are still just plants. If you move at their pace, there is no reason not to follow age old gardening techniques, and try to develop as strong rootball in several stages by successive uppotting. We have methods to plop your plant, rootball intact, right into a hole specially made in a pot of new soil, that DOES NOT CAUSE ANY STRESS to the plant, and they just keep on keeping on. All this malarkey about uppotting causing stress to an auto is BS. Also, think about the feeding thing a sec... a fast growing plant, rapidly gaining maturity and pumping out buds... what in that says to you that it needs less nutes?? Don't follow the hype... read your plants and do what they tell you to do.
 

Big Sparks

Well-Known Member
*gives a standing O for Emilya's advice *

Couldn't have said it any better @Emilya . The only thing that I could think to add is, be careful with how much and how often that you give your plants recharge. I mean, it's pretty good stuff and all. Have some myself. But again I find myself saying this, but less is more. :) When I first used recharge I was like wow! This stuff is great! I should just give my girls some more...and/or maybe even a little more often. Well, I did that. Next thing I know my plants were getting funky. Light green in color, and starting getting rust spots. I added a top-dressing of some "craft blend" from build a soil. Then they proceeded to quickly get worse. Basically never really recovered, because I didnt waste the time. I rushed them into flower and they did alright. Nothing special that's for sure, but finished. Lol!
Anywho, I ended up trying to use the recharge less and less and actually have had better results using less than what the manufacturer recommends.
I know that it's only supposed to be like microbes or whatever, but I believe it does either help or hinder the way your plants take up nutrients. Honestly, with that mix your using you could probably just add some extra compost and worm castings, maybe a lil more pumus rock or rice hulls matching your amount of added humus. Then just up-pot. But maybe even more importantly, well time your up-pottings as Emilya says. Like a solo cup, to a 1-2 gallon to start and veg the plant out. Then up-pot to a 3-5 gallon pot, let her get used to it and spread some roots for a week or two, then flip to flower. And that Ocean Forest mix with some added compost should get most Indicas and Hybrids to the finish line. And if they appear to be lacking something, maybe scratch in some more castings/compost mixed together on the top around the base of the plant and water in.
The longer and more you grow, the more you will learn, and the more confident you will become. Because as you go on, you will begin to recognize when your plants need something and can address the problem in a timely manner.
Thank for listening to me ramble. Lol!
 

oldsmokey

New Member
Hello all caught up from the start. I know nothing about growing autos and have never tried it. So I will just follow along and maybe I want to learn something. :D
 

PK

New Member
nice looking girl you goto there brief. Im gonna grab my popcorns and watch in the background. You've already got helpful and knowledgeable members giving you advise :popcorn:
 
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