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Broken main stem while stress training

Virgin Ground

Nug of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Feb 2020 - Plant of the Month: July 2020 - Nug of the Month: June 2019, Nov 2020 - Photo of the Month: Aug 2019
Duct tape works great for me. You definitely want to tape or splint it somehow.
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020, Aug 2021
tape, twine, ... I have seen the craziest things work, and when the branch was just hanging on by a few hairs. Weeds are amazing sometimes!
 

LiberalThinker

Well-Known Member
So I was doing a bit of super cropping and the main stem sorta snapped but not completely off
.....would it heal itself or do I have to tape it ?
The top half is still very much on the plant but you can tell the inside is broken !!!!:lot-o-toke::nervous-guy::hmmmm:
it should be alright, just think that some people graft branches on to trees. Get a suitable piece of stick over the break and wrap tape around. I did that once and got a fabulous cola.
 

falstaffo

Well-Known Member
im a a pro at this...

fear not!!!
duck tape is your friend!! if it needs something extra tying around for support do that too!
i snapped a thick main stem on a mainlined girl, both ends.. various branches and limbs, around, with a tight taping, or loose, as required, and shes a blooming like a beauty regardless!!
gimme half hour or so and il show you what i mean! then you wont worry so much lol
 

falstaffo

Well-Known Member
here we go
two separate splits lol
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but to look at her...
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Lastbud

Member
im a a pro at this...

fear not!!!
duck tape is your friend!! if it needs something extra tying around for support do that too!
i snapped a thick main stem on a mainlined girl, both ends.. various branches and limbs, around, with a tight taping, or loose, as required, and shes a blooming like a beauty regardless!!
gimme half hour or so and il show you what i mean! then you wont worry so much lol
How long do you think it will take to heal ???
 

Virgin Ground

Nug of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Feb 2020 - Plant of the Month: July 2020 - Nug of the Month: June 2019, Nov 2020 - Photo of the Month: Aug 2019
Some plants just keep growing right through this. Mine may have slowed for a day or two.
 

parnelli

Well-Known Member
Started the next round of low-stress training and broke the main stem on one plant. Did trauma surgery and cut a slice in the stem - coated in root tone plugged it into an aerogrow pod and stuck it in a glass of water. That was 3 days ago and it hasn't died yet :woohoo:

Though I also saw a little black bug but haven't seen it since. I'm going to try the slicky yellow paper trick - I'll bet a fruit fly trap would work too.
 

SmokingWings

Well-Known Member
So I was doing a bit of super cropping and the main stem sorta snapped but not completely off
.....would it heal itself or do I have to tape it ?
The top half is still very much on the plant but you can tell the inside is broken !!!!:lot-o-toke::nervous-guy::hmmmm:
When I have to do some training I will often twist the stiff stems until I feel them give a small snap on the inside. Then I start the aggressive bend until the top part of the stem is horizontal. Sometimes I hang something light weight to hold it down or sometimes I tie it off to the edge of the pot. Otherwise it will eventually straighten itself almost to the point of the whole stem pointing up. Never have bothered to use ductwork tape or electrical tape to reinforce the stem. On occasion when doing the bending after the snap the outer layer will split open. That will heal up soon and develop a scar tissue.

The first two photos below are old ones I posted awhile ago when someone asked the same sort of question. It is of two indoor grown plants and shows the twist in the stem and then the right angle bend. One bend is 1 day old and the other is from the previous week. The area where the thin bark on the step split is clearly visible. Somewhere I have pictures of other bent stems that were photographed 1 and sometimes 2 months or more after I did the training and the knuckle of scar tissue is very evident. OK, I found them and they are the second set of two photos.

bend01.jpgbend02.jpg

These two photos just below were on a couple of plants I had growing in someone else's outdoor grow area. She and her husband asked me to help them put a cover of fencing over the top of their medical grow area. Later when the plants became to tall she thought of tying them down with long pieces of bed sheet. I just did the stem twist and bend on my plants and left it at that. The photos were taken minutes before we harvested the plants in mid October approx 6 weeks after doing the bending. Notice the scar tissue or knuckle growth. The plant certainly went on like nothing had happened to it in early September.

bend03.jpgbendo4.jpg

Like I mentioned earlier I have not had a reason to use duct tape or any other tape yet. Though I did have to use some ribbon once to tie a split crotch where a side branch met the main stem (no tape used then either).

Have a good day and enjoy the new year.
 

Autofacade

Well-Known Member
I done something very similar this year when growing outside, even more worrying when I had to think of airborne disease and all sorts. It split where I had topped the plant and was almost a week point. I put tape around and because it was a good 8ft tall plant I also had to use twine. To counter infections etc I used a small bit of vaseline around along the split once I had tied it up. Honey works great aswell!
 

SmokingWings

Well-Known Member
I done something very similar this year when growing outside, even more worrying when I had to think of airborne disease and all sorts. It split where I had topped the plant and was almost a week point. I put tape around and because it was a good 8ft tall plant I also had to use twine. To counter infections etc I used a small bit of vaseline around along the split once I had tied it up. Honey works great aswell!
Just my opinion but the idea that a wound will result in a problem is blown out of proportion. Think about all the shrubs that are trimmed and pruned during the summer and nobody goes back and treats every cut point with something. The Vaseline might is a petroleum product and if there was any airborne disease that landed on that cut it would be sealed in by the Vaseline. Same with the honey which by itself is not a problem but it could attract insects which could be carrying a disease.

I did a search looking for what could be used for treating small wounds on plants and found this short pdf from Washington State University...
https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/wound-sealer.pdf

Tying up weak splits is a good idea if trying to save that part of the plant, though.
 

Autofacade

Well-Known Member
Just my opinion but the idea that a wound will result in a problem is blown out of proportion. Think about all the shrubs that are trimmed and pruned during the summer and nobody goes back and treats every cut point with something. The Vaseline might is a petroleum product and if there was any airborne disease that landed on that cut it would be sealed in by the Vaseline. Same with the honey which by itself is not a problem but it could attract insects which could be carrying a disease.

I did a search looking for what could be used for treating small wounds on plants and found this short pdf from Washington State University...
https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/403/2015/03/wound-sealer.pdf

Tying up weak splits is a good idea if trying to save that part of the plant, though.
Agreed about the shrub etc but a shrub isnt gunna set you back £600 if it dies haha. I get what you mean the but the use of the vaseline is to act as a barrier rather than aid the plant directly. And the use of honey is that it is a natural disinfectant and holds many anti bacterial and viral benefits. But tbh anything is better than nothing IMO. People have been using tree sap and natural remedies on bonsai for years! When growing outdoors so many things out there to ruin your babies!!! I'll take a look at that document will be helpful thankyou!
 

Carcass

Member of the Month: Aug 2019, May 2021 - Nug of the Month: May 2020 - Plant of the Month: Mar 2021
I was doing a bit of super cropping and the main stem sorta snapped but not completely off
If that's it in the pic,then that's what supercropping is all about....You want it to stay bent over.
It will grow a big ol' knot right at the kink, and that's about the extent of any healing that's going to happen.
This will slow it down for 3 days or so,and allow the shorter shoots to catch up-this,in turn,will help to keep the canopy nice and even.
And that's what supercropping does.
This is a supercropped branch from my last grow-you can see
I had to bend it twice to keep it the right height.
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