Cannabis Analyzing Question

nickelrw87

New Member
So i have been looking up methods of how laboratories analyze and test samples to THC content, CBD profile etc and it seems the bud has to be at a VERY low moisture level to properly test. Now lets say i have this one bud, that i have been perfecting my drying and curing to what i personally think is optimal and i want it tested at that particular time in its life. From what i understand, the if the sample isn't at the moisture level for the equipment to test, the lab would dry it out in an oven of sorts.

My questions are:

1. Would the oven drying alter any of the compounds in any significant way?
2. Would testing it, without drying it, be inaccurate?
3. Are you able to test fresh, green buds? Or will you have to dry it for an efficient test run?

Im not too sure where to ask this - so i think this is the most general question sub-thread.
 

theengineer

New Member
have you asked the laboratory? they usually have reasons for doing things a specific way, and should be happy to share them with you; in fact, you might even get them on thier website FAQ :peace:
 

CoNerd

New Member
My questions are:

1. Would the oven drying alter any of the compounds in any significant way?
2. Would testing it, without drying it, be inaccurate?
3. Are you able to test fresh, green buds? Or will you have to dry it for an efficient test run?

Im not too sure where to ask this - so i think this is the most general question sub-thread.

I think you are making some false assumptions about cannabis testing. You'll have to ask each lab what equipment they use and how they prepare their samples to really know. The testing labs around here use HPLC/UPLC.

1. Labs can easily test very moist or even liquid samples. The 'L' in HPLC/UPLC is for Liquid.
2. Even if you needed to dry a sample, it can easily be done without heating. Cold and vacuum work pretty well.

In the late 70's we used to deep freeze our 'grass' to help it "cure" and dry out without a lot of smell. Freeze-dried herb. Then, put it through an Isomerizer. Ahh, those were the days.... :)
 

nickelrw87

New Member
I think you are making some false assumptions about cannabis testing. You'll have to ask each lab what equipment they use and how they prepare their samples to really know. The testing labs around here use HPLC/UPLC.

1. Labs can easily test very moist or even liquid samples. The 'L' in HPLC/UPLC is for Liquid.
2. Even if you needed to dry a sample, it can easily be done without heating. Cold and vacuum work pretty well.

In the late 70's we used to deep freeze our 'grass' to help it "cure" and dry out without a lot of smell. Freeze-dried herb. Then, put it through an Isomerizer. Ahh, those were the days.... :)

That is just awesome. lol. That is very true tho, with the vacuum and everything. Never thought of that. If you dont mind me asking, where is "around here" for you?
 

Dutty Panty

New Member
Analytical 360 tests here's some of my results through them
DSC_11276.JPG
DSC_03988.JPG
 

CoNerd

New Member
That is just awesome. lol. That is very true tho, with the vacuum and everything. Never thought of that. If you dont mind me asking, where is "around here" for you?

Denver Metro area. Sorry, I'm assuming you have access to a lab which has proper equipment for doing an analysis like Analytical 360. I just looked through their web site and they have a nice set of services. I like that they show the HPLC results. They need a better microscope, though.

There's infinite ways to assay a sample. You'll have to figure out what, if any, testing will provide the answers you are looking for.
Doing a reproducible analysis of any biological sample, even via HPLC is pretty hard. You have to really understand sample to sample variation before you can detect the effects in changes to your processes. "How big are the error bars" is something you need to think and ask about when doing any testing. Often the error bars are way bigger than the signal and we just fool ourselves.

Hope this helps

:Namaste:
 

nickelrw87

New Member
Denver Metro area. Sorry, I'm assuming you have access to a lab which has proper equipment for doing an analysis like Analytical 360. I just looked through their web site and they have a nice set of services. I like that they show the HPLC results. They need a better microscope, though.

There's infinite ways to assay a sample. You'll have to figure out what, if any, testing will provide the answers you are looking for.
Doing a reproducible analysis of any biological sample, even via HPLC is pretty hard. You have to really understand sample to sample variation before you can detect the effects in changes to your processes. "How big are the error bars" is something you need to think and ask about when doing any testing. Often the error bars are way bigger than the signal and we just fool ourselves.

Hope this helps

:Namaste:

Thanks so much for your input! I dont have any access to labs in my area even tho we are medical :/ - hopefully that will change soon. I guess since its a new industry with very few standards the margin of error could be pretty large if the labs don't have the methods down.
 
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