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Cannabis Dosing: Delivery Methods & Dosing Guidelines

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Some additional guidelines:

Current studies indicate that sublingual is no more effective than edible administration. In truth, most people using sublingual are swallowing the entire time, so to be honest, sublingual is really oral administration.

If it's really oral, why bother trying to keep it in the mouth all that time? Try smaller doses, spaced out through the day.

Mara Gordon's crew at Aunt Zelda's sees more efficient systemic use of cannbinoids therapies when you space the THC-dominant doses at least two hours from the CBD-dominant doses.

Their typical dosing schedule goes something like this:

* 10-15 mg of a THC med to start the day
* 2-4 hours later take half the daily dose of your CBD med
* 2-6 hours later take the rest of the CBD dose
* finish the day with the major THC dose before bed

This plan keeps the dominant cannabinoids from competing with each other and gets the majority of the euphoria out of the way during sleep hours.
 
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SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
I've been thinking about how to structure a general cannabinoid therapy, oral administration, and I think this is a good plan:

* Begin sub-therapeutically and in equal ratio THC:CBD - begin somewhere around 2.5 - 5 mg a day.
* Raise the dose by no more than 2.5 mg each until you feel any effect. Stay there until you adjust to feeling normal again.
* When you can, begin raising the dose again, until you feel the need to adjust to the euphoria again, or until you hit 10 mg of each major cannabinoid.
* Begin ramping up CBD to 2:1, to 3:1, and lastly to 5:1. You're hoping that one of these combinations are offering the relief you seek without more THC.
* If the 5:1 doesn't do it for you start ramping up both major cannabinoids by the same number of milligrams - if you increase THC by 5 mg you also increase CBD by the same amount.
* Many small doses throughout the day work more efficiently than one dose a day.

Without the addition of larger numbers of CBD you keep raising the THC dose and adjusting to the euphoria until you simply can't be comfortable, then you back off one step in the titration and euphoria backs off to a manageable level.

You won't see side effects with CBD doses until your into the hundreds of milligrams. If loose stools or diarrhea occur, look at those CBD levels and consider backing off a tad.


Obviously, this isn't the way to treat cancer. I'd go with suppositories as soon as the patient was introduced to the cannabinoids, say by the second week. You won't be able to function at the THC levels it takes to treat cancer if the administration is all through the gut.

But this plan may accomodate just about any disease state that you take oral canna meds for. At a 4:1 or 5:1 CBD:THC ratio you shouldn't feel the euphoric effects of THC at all. If you try this and you do get euphoric we'd appreciate hearing from you about it. :4:
 

Kriaze

Well-Known Member
Hello SweetSue it's been awhile and it's good to see that your studies are still in full flow. I came here after reading about a cancer patient struggling with dosing and a link being posted to here and I ended up reading through everything as I tend to do as well as getting sidetracked from the original reason I came here, much to my delight of course.

While reading through a part of your notes I found something that was pertinent to my own reasons for using Cannabis (anxiety mainly) and I found myself getting confused, right at the point where you tell the reader not to. I'll post the actual quote(s) and hope that you can help me, I'm not sure if I'm tired and missing something but it would be great if you could clarify for me:


"Get this part right. Confusing this point will not not go well.
** Depression calls for a sativa-type stimulant.
** Anxiety calls for a relaxant, so choose an indica hybrid or a CBD-rich strain.

Both conditions will challenge you. Usually a choice of a hybrid or a mix of THC/CBD will do the trick.

* With anxiety avoid high doses of CBD, as this may cause anxiety"

This is the part that I'm finding confusing, the information seems contradictive in that for anxiety a CBD rich strain is recommended and then below as you can see it also states to avoid high CBD as this in itself may cause anxiety. I'm perplexed and wondering if you could point out what I'm missing please. You do actually reiterate that a high CBD strain is preferable lower down in your dosing summary which has me further wondering:

"* For anti-anxiety or anti-psychotic choose strains or meds high in CBD or an indica hybrid."

Thanks for any response in advance and I hope that you are well, once again thanks for providing me an interesting read, one of many I have enjoyed since joining the magazine. May your buds be forever bountiful :Namaste:
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Hello SweetSue it's been awhile and it's good to see that your studies are still in full flow. I came here after reading about a cancer patient struggling with dosing and a link being posted to here and I ended up reading through everything as I tend to do as well as getting sidetracked from the original reason I came here, much to my delight of course.

While reading through a part of your notes I found something that was pertinent to my own reasons for using Cannabis (anxiety mainly) and I found myself getting confused, right at the point where you tell the reader not to. I'll post the actual quote(s) and hope that you can help me, I'm not sure if I'm tired and missing something but it would be great if you could clarify for me:


"Get this part right. Confusing this point will not not go well.
** Depression calls for a sativa-type stimulant.
** Anxiety calls for a relaxant, so choose an indica hybrid or a CBD-rich strain.

Both conditions will challenge you. Usually a choice of a hybrid or a mix of THC/CBD will do the trick.

* With anxiety avoid high doses of CBD, as this may cause anxiety"

This is the part that I'm finding confusing, the information seems contradictive in that for anxiety a CBD rich strain is recommended and then below as you can see it also states to avoid high CBD as this in itself may cause anxiety. I'm perplexed and wondering if you could point out what I'm missing please. You do actually reiterate that a high CBD strain is preferable lower down in your dosing summary which has me further wondering:

"* For anti-anxiety or anti-psychotic choose strains or meds high in CBD or an indica hybrid."

Thanks for any response in advance and I hope that you are well, once again thanks for providing me an interesting read, one of many I have enjoyed since joining the magazine. May your buds be forever bountiful :Namaste:
I can see the confusion Kraize. This thread was from class note of a course I took on Green Flower Media, and I can see it could use a little editing, or better yet a new companion thread with what we’ve learned since.

Ok, the high doses that’ll cause anxiety are CBD doses in the hundreds of milligrams, so that’s not likely to happen in homemade meds, unless you have a CBD isolate you can use to beef up the numbers. The only reason we’ve played with CBD that high in concentration is when you’re going through opioid withdrawal.

The major confusion, and one I only figured out myself recently, is that medical professionals refer to any chemovar with at least a balanced ratio of THC:CBD to be high CBD.

With anxiety it’s smart to try a 1:2 ratio and increase the CBD to a 1:5 before you start micro dosing in THC. The real trick is to keep the THC you’re adding in balance with the same amount of CBD. In this way you always keep the higher value of CBD as THC levels climb. It controls euphoria and allows you to get more THC in without running the ECS too hot.

With extreme anxiety you’re looking for ratios of up to 1:8 THC:CBD.

Someone dealing with depression will spiral into it with indica-based drugs. The same is true for anxiety patients on sativas. You have to be alert for suicidal thoughts. It’s the terpenes that’re creating the chaos in each case. Pinene and limonene, in particular, stress an anxious system in the same way linalool and myrcene will a depressed countenance.

Did I make that any clearer?
 

Kriaze

Well-Known Member
Thanks for trying to explain, although this soon out of bed I could probably have settled for the first part of the answer without the extra information regarding the limonene and pinene because as far as I was aware pinene~a is in all strains of Cannabis. I remember posting this in the thread regarding the effect of pepper vs paranoia or some such thread that I found interesting. Maybe I should go revisit the thread or reread the paper from the British Journal of Pharmacology, it's been so long and so many highs since lol.

Anyway that's me off on a quest to refresh my memory, all the best on your quest for knowledge :thumb:
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Yes, a-pinene is found across the spectrum of cannabis lines, but it’ll show up in various concentrations.

Have fun relearning. Please share what you learn. :5:
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016

Hazeri

Well-Known Member
If any meds contain the caution to avoid grapefruit juice, this is a red flag for your CBD cannabinoid therapy. Isolate CBD products will probably interfere with the timely degradation of these medications, causing them to build up in the system, with the danger of toxicity. Speak to the physician overseèing those medications, even if you're using a whole plant extraction. The CBD isn't the problem here. The overload of the pharmaceutical is.
Sue, did you imagine how to consume cbd that medicines do a lot less to do toxicity for HCV men? It is consumed 1 hour before taking the medicine. Is that right?
:green_heart:
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Sue, did you imagine how to consume cbd that medicines do a lot less to do toxicity for HCV men? It is consumed 1 hour before taking the medicine. Is that right?
:green_heart:
This caution applies mostly to CBD isolates. A full-plant extraction will have a wealth of other components that work in synergy to keep things more even. It’s still a good idea to have the medical team watch lab results more closely.

If it’s going to be a concern for someone it’d be best to make that hour separation for dosing, but it’s more important that the lab results be watched to see if anything’s building up. The CBD molecules get first preference in being transported into the cells, effectively blocking the pharma drugs trying to take the same pathway.

The solution is not to limit CBD, but to adjust the pharma drugs to match their bioavailability.
 
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