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Cannabis Rezination

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021
I use a free program called Faststone Image Viewer (from faststone.org) for anything that doesn't absolutely have to be done in Photoshop. I use it as my default viewer in Windows and it's got loads of features considering it's free. It's a breeze to crop, resize, change brightness/contrast/color balance, as well as draw on and label.

This is what the icon looks like so you know you're in the right place:
icon.JPG
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
I use a free program called Faststone Image Viewer (from faststone.org) for anything that doesn't absolutely have to be done in Photoshop. I use it as my default viewer in Windows and it's got loads of features considering it's free. It's a breeze to crop, resize, change brightness/contrast/color balance, as well as draw on and label.

This is what the icon looks like so you know you're in the right place:
icon.JPG
Thanks shed,
I want to try and help Rex better by having clearly labeled edits of his pics. I should have asked you a long time ago! :love:
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021

Morda Grown

Well-Known Member
I use a free program called Faststone Image Viewer (from faststone.org) for anything that doesn't absolutely have to be done in Photoshop. I use it as my default viewer in Windows and it's got loads of features considering it's free. It's a breeze to crop, resize, change brightness/contrast/color balance, as well as draw on and label.

This is what the icon looks like so you know you're in the right place:
icon.JPG
This Laptop I have at the moment don't do graphics well. I have just been using MS Paint. I have better but, they are old and won't install on Win9. Thanks for posting this, I'll give it go too.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021
This Laptop I have at the moment don't do graphics well. I have just been using MS Paint. I have better but, they are old and won't install on Win9. Thanks for posting this, I'll give it go too.
I'm still using Win7 at work and home so I know it will work on older versions.
 

Morda Grown

Well-Known Member
I need to rebuild my Tower PC and get back on Win7Ult so I can use the version of Corel I have again. LOL As for this it does things paint don't do and will have a use to me TY! :thumb: That or just ditch Win and Run Gimp on Linux.
 

Jon

Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2021
Ahoy 420,
I am recalling a conversation about LED lighting and "cotton topping" I had with the engineer who designed my lights from CM. My bars have a recommended flower canopy to light separation of 30 inches. These are designed for industrial size gardens and the lights hang neatly 30 inches above the plants. Running closer gaps often results in cotton topping (bleaching) that is resolved by adding nutrients. From recent pics of the Northern Stankberry you can see I have colas as close as 12 inches. The girls are fed according to MC recs. plus ~25%. Additionally the chow is amended with cal/mag and potassium silicate. Thats it. No bloom nutes, no tricks. The source of illumination has to be balanced with the rations of nutrients we deliver.

So ifin your running led and ya notice bleaching, bump up the food. I have to be real careful talking lights as mine are not from a approved vendor. Teddy will zap me again with his editorial privileges and I prefer not pissing off my host.
Love this and agree 100%. I also have a non sponsored but very serious light I can't discuss, and I have found exactly what you say here to be true. My photos are at 1300 par right now. My cutoff, since I have no Co2, is 1400, if they can take it. Most can. At least that's been my experience.

To further clarify, what I mean by "if they can take it" is one of two things:
1. You can hit them at 1300/1400 and they're fine with it and DON'T bleach
2. You can hit them at 1300/14000 par and overnute them as you point out and they DON'T bleach.

Basically, until I can't stop the bleaching they keep getting more and more light/par level as budding progresses. I'm at 10" in that photo tent, and my entire footprint with my light is 1300. I can go to about 6", maybe 8.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
thinking bout @Rexer droughting a waterborne auto and how a foliar application of meja is probably best compared to a traditional drought. by directly stimulating JA pathways when the spray hits the leaves. as fast as turning off a valve... Kept this thought off your thread but it did not imply you should abort the study.
 
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Rexer

Member of the Month: April 2021 - Photo of the Month: July 2021
thinking bout @Rexer droughting a waterborne auto and how a foliar application of meja is probably best compared to a traditional drought. by directly stimulating JA pathways when the spray hits the leaves. as fast as turning off a valve... Kept this thought off your thread but it did not imply you should abort the study.
At some point I'll have to give the meja a try.
I'm thinking however that there might be some great value of the experiment.
In the sense that having a medium that doesn't really retain moisture, helps eliminate that variable (for moisture).


Question @Maritimer. Have you done repeated droughts on a plant to see the effect of a singular end of life drought, vs repeated droughts?
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
At some point I'll have to give the meja a try.
I'm thinking however that there might be some great value of the experiment.
In the sense that having a medium that doesn't really retain moisture, helps eliminate that variable (for moisture).


Question @Maritimer. Have you done repeated droughts on a plant to see the effect of a singular end of life drought, vs repeated droughts?
by all means please continue with the bruce banner study.

all my early attempts at repeat droughts and doc kaplan's as well resulted in lower yields. not much improvement to cannabinoid profiles either. one is best we think.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
@Rexer my friend, you could be the guy taking hydroponics to its next level.

how your plant reacts to actual drought could mean that if the resin production does not have time to increase noticeably in hydro, then the only way forward for adventurous bubblers would be bubblemeja. :love: imagine bumping your finest hydro by around 20% THC content.

bravely going where few if any have ventured!
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
@Jon
I continue to imagine a device similar to an umbrella frame that could rotate 360. crazy as it sounds hanging baskets for the girls. They make like laundry devices for hanging clothes in a small space that are more heavily framed and a manipulation of that design could prove useful.

Stay strong brother :hookah:
 

West Hippie

Grow Journal of the Month: June 2020 - Member of the Month: Oct 2021
I missed out on all this but caught up now . Rex and I ran into a grower that did airoponics how ever it’s spelled . The reason I gave up was because of him . His buckets are about 15-18” deep and he only feeds from the bottom with an inch maybe a little more of water and nutrients. This is what came to mind for me to drought so out the window As the plant used that it auto feeds another inch I’m like wow all those roots hanging in the air . I guess the uptake had to keep the roots moist enough as not to dry out ! I believe the hydron may be a helping hand in the drought !
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021
Aeroponic buckets need very little water as it's just sprayed on the roots at a fixed interval. So the roots get wet top to bottom when the pump is on, and given how little air movement there is in a bucket, they stay moist for a pretty long time.
 

West Hippie

Grow Journal of the Month: June 2020 - Member of the Month: Oct 2021
Aeroponic buckets need very little water as it's just sprayed on the roots at a fixed interval. So the roots get wet top to bottom when the pump is on, and given how little air movement there is in a bucket, they stay moist for a pretty long time.
He talked like it just had the water in the bottom, what you said makes more sense. Don’t tell anybody but I left Myrina in an empty bucket over night , came in the next morning and she’s reaching for the light like no big deal!
 

Rexer

Member of the Month: April 2021 - Photo of the Month: July 2021
He talked like it just had the water in the bottom, what you said makes more sense. Don’t tell anybody but I left Myrina in an empty bucket over night , came in the next morning and she’s reaching for the light like no big deal!
To me when you said you were gonna DWC drought- that's what I thought you were thinking of doing. I have no clue what effect that would have on the roots...
@Rexer my friend, you could be the guy taking hydroponics to its next level.
Oh that is way too kind, I'm by no means anywhere near that, you sir are the one leading and trail blazing :green_heart:
how your plant reacts to actual drought could mean that if the resin production does not have time to increase noticeably in hydro, then the only way forward for adventurous bubblers would be bubblemeja. :love: imagine bumping your finest hydro by around 20% THC content.

bravely going where few if any have ventured!
Bravely following the trail blazers maybe, but without you...none of it would be happening

How does this seem for an LWA photos? I can get these shots angled fairly consistently.

 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
The first shot is best for us when we look at LWA. The second shot will be good for trike density comparisons. Both winners if they can be repeated fairly close. I tried to get a photo editor but my windows 11 wont allow the open sourcing, however I have recently learned how to put them side by side and then combine them in one picture. Giving you an idea that I am not very computer literate. Maybe @InTheShed can throw up some lines we could measure. :love:
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021
The first shot is best for us when we look at LWA. The second shot will be good for trike density comparisons. Both winners if they can be repeated fairly close. I tried to get a photo editor but my windows 11 wont allow the open sourcing, however I have recently learned how to put them side by side and then combine them in one picture. Giving you an idea that I am not very computer literate. Maybe @InTheShed can throw up some lines we could measure. :love:
@Rexer if you can post full-sized images that would make it easier, but is this about right Maritimer?
20211101_180958_resized.jpg
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018, Oct 2021
my windows 11 wont allow the open sourcing,
Are you saying you can't install the Faststone Image Viewer on Win11? That's insane! Remind me not to upgrade. :(
 
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