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Carbon filters

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020
I am a bit of a DIY addict and I am wondering if anyone knows a good DIY carbon filter. Is it better to just buy new?
I got two large can filters and then when they wore out, I learned how to take them apart, dump out the activated charcoal, cleanse and reactivate it, and then reassemble the filter with just a fraction of new carbon to make up for what had been lost in the process. For one purchase you get the engineering of the can and the sturdiness of the design... and with DIY effort, you can make it last essentially forever.
 

dexterdraco

Member
This is an interesting hobby for me. I have bought a water distiller and made it operational again. I built a grow light (which is doing a good job). I harvested one crop albeit a meager harvest. Most importantly I have had lots of fun.
 
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TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
I just found your post.

I got two large can filters and then when they wore out, I learned how to take them apart, dump out the activated charcoal, cleanse and reactivate it, and then reassemble the filter with just a fraction of new carbon to make up for what had been lost in the process. For one purchase you get the engineering of the can and the sturdiness of the design... and with DIY effort, you can make it last essentially forever.

I was thinking that I read somewhere a year or two ago that the best way to "recharge" (purify, I suppose?) activated carbon was to heat it to at least 750°F (and possibly even higher, as the memory(?) is "a bit" vague :rolleyes: ) in a near vacuum. I cannot replicate those conditions, and my oven must be burning gas more or less constantly to maintain 425°F - the higher settings are probably useless on it. What temperature did you use to reactivate your carbon, and what did you use in order to reach it? Fancy oven with one of those "self-cleaning" cycles in which the door locks and the oven heats to its maximum possible temperature in order to carbonize lazy owners' food spills, or...? If I remember correctly, that type of oven is designed (and insulated) to heat up to 932°F.
 
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