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Conradino23 Keeps On Keeping On Outdoor & Indoor Using LOS/High Brix Methods

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
That’s why I’m looking forward to the harvest and I’ll definitely preserve the line seeing it’s as close to narrow leaf cultivar as it’s possible. If they’re ready in reasonable time that’ll be another plus... well come Fall I’ll have some beans to give away to all interested in working the line.
 

Lerugged

Plant of the Month: May 2019 - Photo of the Month: June 2019
Good morning all. OK so firstly Bob's comment above about music is spot on. I thought it was just me but somehow music sounds so much deeper and more interesting..it just sounds real good.
As far as the ciskei goes...while I may not have had the same one you are growing I've had plenty of the wild one. In my group of mates we always tried to score doob that came either from that area or Malawi cobs (cobs were mostly Malawi gold from one area of Malawi). Both of those were great for social occasions and having a good time. Made you laugh and smile and almost impossible to be angry or a dickhead. No ceiling and basically just get super high and eventually pass out. I collected some beans with some mates while in the area. Never grown them. Probably close on 20 years old now. Durban and Malawi( from the mountain area, not gold )are the kinda weed that can turn a party on its head. Whole lot of people just won't handle the ride. That's fine of course.
When I saw you were growing it I smiled because you are in for a treat and I'm pretty sure that you are going to be growing many more.
@Smeegol lives closer to that area I think. Ask any south african
If they remember the party good time weed and I'm sure they will smile fondly.
Just so cool.
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Yeah music sounds really good on Malawi... it’s like being on a gig in a front row. That’s the psychedelic, time-and-space transforming quality of this strain that does that. With Ciskei I hope for more uplifting, euphoric high, but without speedy end. We’ll see if I get that :)
 

Smeegol

Well-Known Member
If I jump in the car I can be in the Drakensberg foothills in 35min and another 20min to get winding up the many roads leading into it..
My knowledge of our landraces only extends to what I have smoked of them as I was young enough to not realise the importance of what I was getting this days...haha
We used to hike weekends to find certain villages in the berg because by word of mouth in the farming communities we'd hear of rooibaardt,dp being grown in some alley somewhere so you'd go search and find it...
But there were times you were almost giddy and delirious from how strong a joint between 3 could be that you couldn't venture back down the trails for fear of doing something stupid...

@Strainyourbrain was kind enough to gift me with some of his Transkei which I dropped 5 two nights ago as I'm also curious to see what comes thereof.

Afternoon gentlemen and beautiful looking lady mr.Conradino...:48:
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Hey @Smeegol and welcome!

Yeah that’s it, innit? You’re too young ro realise when you have something really valuable on your hands and then it’s too late.

I can believe the potency of African strains as I experienced one first hand. It’s trippy to the point when you’re really not in control anymore... but some of these can reach up to 27% thc, so very high for a landrace.
 

Smeegol

Well-Known Member
Id love to come across a sativa that blocks my back pain on a daily basis but no luck so far, I believe the ATF is very good for pain as per mr.Stank and I'm trying that this season but I only have 2 so fingers crossed, I'm going blind with the Transkei I dropped but I see mr.Rugged has a cpl that have popped so I'm going to follow closely.

But young and dumb indeed and agreed on the trippy part...haha

I remember back early in your journal ( lurker back then ) you mentioned making bamboo charcoal and using it in your holes, is this for the soil and microbes and does it act as a pest deterrent as hardwood charcoal...?
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Pest deterrent not really. Biochar is a conditioner and carbon source for the soil. It’s useful with low NPK soils where collaboration with soil biota is crucial. It reduces nitrification rate in short term and improves it in the long one. It also improves the structure, raises CEC and stimulates microlife. It’s an interesting addition to organic soil, but shouldn’t be treated as a miraculous tool... there’s a lot of hype around it recently that’s coming from the Emerald Triangle, but the truth is in nutrient rich mixes it’ll make very little to no difference :)
 
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conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017
I tried the Bamboo biochar this spring outdoors on a raised bed. Basically burned up a bunch of short bamboo sticks on top of the soil. Let cook worked the ashes and charcoal (put the fire out before everything went to ash) and also cuase the fire department showed up. lol

Anyway yeah wife planted potatoes in that bed - they growing spectacularly now. The soil wasn't that well amended. It had a lot of clay and neglected adding much organic matter. I actually didn't have any hopes for potatoes. We will see.

I'll be making more bamboo biochar - thanks for the read Con.

Looks like adding the biochar to our Vermi-compost is going to be huge! Looks like red wigglers like it.
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
I tried the Bamboo biochar this spring outdoors on a raised bed. Basically burned up a bunch of short bamboo sticks on top of the soil. Let cook worked the ashes and charcoal (put the fire out before everything went to ash) and also cuase the fire department showed up. lol

Anyway yeah wife planted potatoes in that bed - they growing spectacularly now. The soil wasn't that well amended. It had a lot of clay and neglected adding much organic matter. I actually didn't have any hopes for potatoes. We will see.

I'll be making more bamboo biochar - thanks for the read Con.

Looks like adding the biochar to our Vermi-compost is going to be huge! Looks like red wigglers like it.
It'll break clay all right especially if you add it with a little bit of compost, but clay is a really good start for a nice soil if you have time to build it. It usually has enough phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc and even nitrogen for weed. Actually potatoes are a heavy crop. They're tubers so they need excessive amount of phosphorus to grow well and potassium. Once you broke down some soil and pulled out excess of magnesium via potato crop, that's a great start for cannabis soil with that biochar!

Thank you kindly for your input gents bookmarked it ....
You're welcome, man :48:
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
It seems this grow just can't stay away from temp swings... another heatwave is upon us and I'm getting almost 32C in the tent today. Both plants look like shit after the sulphur burn, but somehow they both have managed to stay in HB zone.

This is UD for you in her 8th week and will be taken in 2-3 days when she crashes completely. Plant has added stinky mushroom cloud to her fuel, but also a bit of sweet perfume. In general she smells like Chem UD should and I will have to yet find stronger pine smelling strain. This ones will clean up your nose when you smell the bud and it's not even the best expression I've seen in this line :)







 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Yep about 2 g per plant in a concentration of 99,9%... for 10 and 15 kg of soil. It was definitely excessive and maybe even half of that would be too bold. I don’t remember now, but I don’t think you should have more than 15 ppm of total soluble sulphur and this is quite a lot already. Well that proves one thing cannabis is extremely sulphur sensitive. One thing this has done imo it changed the smell into something really different. Some terpenes started regressing and some really popped up. PD smells like hazelnut cake you know butter, cocoa, sugar and crushed and the lime practically went away :48:
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017
I thought that Sulphur produces mostly esthers and alcohols more than terpenes. This may be why there’s such a difference in aroma and taste with high Sulphur amounts.
 

Skybound

Well-Known Member
I've read an old wives tale on RIU that suggests Mag sulfate accentuates the fruity scents and flavors and Potassium sulfate accents the citrus notes. I never was in a position to test that theory as I use both, plus also sulfate from gypsum. FWIW, I've had my sulfur content just shy of 150ppm, but that is in hydro/potted rockwool. Here's an excerpt from my hydro book about sulfur. Though not directly relatable to soil, there's still good info that can be cross applied.

Sulfur (S)

Content in Plants

Sulfur plant leaf content ranges from 0.15 to 0.50% of the plant dry matter,
although >1.00% levels are not unusual.

Function
Sulfur is a constituent of two amino acids, cystine and thiamine, which play
essential roles in the plant. Plants in the Leguminosae and Cruciferae families
have higher requirements for S than most others. They contain a number of
S compounds which are easily recognized by their contribution to the odor
and flavor of the eatable portion of the plant. Sulfur is absorbed by plant
roots as the SO4(2-) anion.

Deficiency Symptoms

Sulfur deficiency symptoms are quite similar to those of N deficiency and
therefore can confuse even those most expert in plant nutrition evaluation. In
general, S deficiency symptoms appear as an overall loss of green color in the
plant rather than a loss of primary color in the older leaves, which is the typical
N deficiency symptom (see page 38). It may be necessary, and is probably best,
to rely on a plant analysis to confirm a possible S and/or N deficiency problem,
rather than relying on visual symptoms alone (see pages 319–324).
Some authorities feel that the relationship of S to N is far more important
than S concentration alone. Therefore, the N/S ratio might be a better measure
of S sufficiency in the plant than total S alone. Equally important may be the
amount of SO4(2-) present in the plant. Some plant physiologists have suggested
the use of the ratio of SO4(2-) to total S as the best indicator of sufficiency for
this element. Therefore, the literature at the present time is confusing as to
the best measure of S sufficiency in plants.

Accumulation in the Rooting Medium
With each application of a nutrient solution containing SO4(2-) and the element
Ca to the rooting medium, whether inorganic (sand, gravel, perlite, rookwool,
etc.) or organic (pinebark, coir, peat, etc.), a precipitation of SO4(2-) with Ca
begins to occur, forming in the rooting medium at an ever increasing accumulation.
Being colloidal in physical form and in eminent contact with plant
roots, a portion of this precipitate is dissolved by root acidification and the
released SO4(2-) and Ca s well as other elements trapped in the precipitate
provide a major source for these elements for uptake and utilization. This
partially explains why the effect of applied nutrient solution on the composition
of the plant with time becomes less a reflection of nutrient solution
composition for most of the precipitated elements, both major and micronutrient.
although the common recommended practice for control of the nutrient
element content of the growing medium, determined by EC measurements
(see page 106), is periodic water leaching, leaching that will not remove
accumulated precipitates.

Concentration in a Nutrient Solution

Most hydroponic formulas call for a S concentration around 50 mg/L (ppm).
Sulfur exists in solution as the SO4(2-) anion. The concentration of the SO4(2-)
anion in a nutrient solution formulation may be determined by what other
reagents are in the formulation to supply either Mg as MgSO4•7H2O, K as
K2SO4, or NH4 as (NH4)2SO4.

Nutrient Solution Reagents
The sulfate salts of K, Mg, and NH4 [K2SO4, MgSO4•7H2O, (NH4)2SO4, respectively]
are frequently selected as one of the major sources for N, K, or Mg,
which automatically adds S to the nutrient solution. There use in various
formulations may add more S than needed for plant sufficiency. Little is known
about S excess, including whether it can occur and in what form. Evidently
plants can tolerate a high concentration of the SO4(2-) anion in a nutrient solution
without harm to the plant.
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
I thought that Sulphur produces mostly esthers and alcohols more than terpenes. This may be why there’s such a difference in aroma and taste with high Sulphur amounts.
It might be pushing volatile alcohols too and weed has a lot of them too... they influence the smell big way sometimes.... let’s take the FUEL or DiESEL smell for example, it’s 70-80% pinene, cause when you actually rub the bud or do the the nose dive-in it’s always piney... but then there are funky and strong odours too which you just can’t get from terpenes alone... yeah it all figures out in the end :48:

I've read an old wives tale on RIU that suggests Mag sulfate accentuates the fruity scents and flavors and Potassium sulfate accents the citrus notes. I never was in a position to test that theory as I use both, plus also sulfate from gypsum. FWIW, I've had my sulfur content just shy of 150ppm, but that is in hydro/potted rockwool. Here's an excerpt from my hydro book about sulfur. Though not directly relatable to soil, there's still good info that can be cross applied.
Yeah hard to say what really happens, but the smell definitely changes... it’d be probably somewhere along genetic lines, some will get funkier, some fruitier and some will get crazily sweet... we have shitloads of stuff like that to discover... I really believe we’re scratching the surface for now :smokin2:
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017
A lot of new Afghan, Pakistani, Nepali and Indian Landrace are coming available. Hopefully we'll find some older terpene combos in those strains.
 

Skybound

Well-Known Member
we have shitloads of stuff like that to discover... I really believe we’re scratching the surface for now :smokin2:
For me, the fun is in the unknown and trying to make it known.
 
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