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Cooking with Cannabis Science

Julie Gardener

New Member
Cooking with Cannabis Science - THC-Extraction - Cannabutter, Cannaoil, and more

Cooking with cannabis is a precise process. Everything from heating temperature to solvent can affect the way cannabis will cook, and how it will affect the body. However, to understand the science of cooking with cannabis, it helps to have a basic understanding of the chemical compounds that make up the marijuana plant, as well as the ways in which these (and other) compounds are metabolized and digested by the human body when combined with foods.

As you’re probably aware, THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) is the main psychoactive chemical compound in cannabis. However, when ingested orally, THC is not readily digested by the human body. Instead, it must be extracted into complementary compounds that the body recognizes and is able to metabolize.

What Are Cannabinoids?
Interestingly, cannabinoids are a group of compounds present in the cannabis plant, which also occur naturally in the nervous and immune systems of humans and animals. For clarity’s sake, some scientists in the field prefer to call the cannabinoids found in natural plant compounds phytocannabinoids and those found in natural animal compounds endocannabinoids.

What Do Cannabinoids Do?
In the human body, these naturally occurring chemicals help control mental and physical processes. In the cannabis plant, they are the compounds responsible for extracting and distributing THC's unique physiological properties.

The natural cannabinoids produced in our bodies bind with specifically designed nervous-system receptors (not coincidentally named cannabinoid receptors) which are responsible for regulating our nervous-system responses such as: mood, appetite, pain sensation, inflammation response and memory. Because of the way THC affects the nervous system, there are numerous medical and health benefits to cooking with cannabis - it can be used to reduce pain, stimulate appetite and reduce anxiety. When combined with the phytocannabinoids in marijuana, our cannabinoid receptors are affected.

In other words, the cannabinoid receptors found naturally in our bodies (CB1 and CB2, if you want to get technical) are recognized and targeted by the cannabinoids in cooked marijuana. When properly extracted, the cannabinoids bind, and THC’s psychoactive effects are brought out. (We like to think this makes a pretty good case for cooking with cannabis. Our bodies are already prepared!)

How to Properly Extract THC
As you’ll remember, THC is the main psychoactive chemical compound in cannabis. It needs to be delivered to the nervous-system by the cannabinoids. But THC is a hydrophobic oil and, as such, is insoluble in water. Therefore, in order be properly converted, it must be extracted into fats, oils, or alcohol, all of which can bind with the cannabinoids to properly deliver the compound to the body.

Cook Cannabis Slowly!
Because THC is a somewhat delicate compound it must be slowly combined with butter or oil over fairly low heat (210 degrees Celsius, 401 degrees Fahrenheit) so that it does not break down and vaporize. This is why cannaoils and cannabutters must be cooked for a long period of time. The solvent must slowly absorb the cannabinoids into the fat molecules which will then act as a vehicle for the THC. These fats also aid absorption in the gut. When digested, these cannabinoid-infused fat molecules bind with our cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, to distribute the now infused THC.

Infused oils and butters are the most common ways to cook with cannabis. Once you’ve mastered the art of a great cannabutter or cannaoil, you can cook cannabis into virtually anything calling for these ingredients. They are simply substituted in dishes that would call for regular oil or butter. Delicious!

Source: cannabischef.com

Here's a recipe for 420 Magazine ® and 420 Magazine ®
 
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branson111190

New Member
You sure that 401 is correct ? I heard from various various sources that THC evaporates at around 350-375 degrees Fahrenheit
 

Julie Gardener

New Member
Good point. Glad you saw that. I looked around as well and see that the Merck Index lists the boiling point of delta 1 Tetrahydrocannabinol as 200° C (392° F).

And then this reference: 'The liquid THC and other cannabinoids have a boiling point of between 180-200° C (355-392° F).'

So probably best to keep it below the high ranges as to not lose the quality of your medicine. ;)
 

smokeydude420

New Member
I love cooking marijuana, but recently i've been on a non-sugar diet and
have not been using refined sugar in my cookie recipes but instead use honey or fruit pectins and they haven't been nearly as strong :(

is there a link between sugar and how well your body absords the THC?
 

Julie Gardener

New Member
First off, congrats on choosing a lifestyle change and giving up the refined sugars. :high-five:

As far as the cooking with Cannabis and sugars, I don't think there would be any link. :30:

Basically all sugars have the same effect in the body but the natural sugars aren't as harsh on your system. I don't believe that the natural sugars react any differently with the cannabis either over refined, but I could be wrong. I'm no expert on that. Maybe just up the Cannabis in your recipe and see if that helps. :1:

Keep us posted :popcorn:
 

branson111190

New Member
Well I heard in another thread that Soy Lecithin increases bio-availability , so adding that in might help . I'm not educated on that , but give that a try also
 

2Tuff2sk8

New Member
I'm just a patient/grandparent/home cook rather than a pharmacology expert. I think a little carbohydrate enhances absorption; only from experience having oil/butter in prepared foods versus just off a spoon. I like to infuse the oil (whatever fat I happen to be using whether olive oil, butter etc) so that it's plenty strong, then prepare food that will allow dosing with small servings.

That said, sometimes I'll spread some butter on a slice of toast - so what sort of foods do you normally eat? I'm sure something would make a good base to medicate, no need to use something sweet, plenty of other options.
 

redfreebird

New Member
How do I make a tincture with out it tasting like pot? I use it to make lollipops for patients but getting complaints on taste when asked to make stronger. I have an hash that I have in alcohol right now. Have to wait for 30 days for curing.
 

BuzzyB

New Member
I made no bake cookies today. I have gone through several batches already. I don't know what happened, but the cookies are RANK!!! Any ideas on how I can fix them? I thought I may have left something out, but I didn't. They are HORRIBLE! Cannot taste the chocolate, the peanut butter or the vanilla....just herb and very strong!!! Help!
 

BuzzyB

New Member
I made no bake cookies today. I have gone through several batches already. I don't know what happened, but the cookies are RANK!!! Any ideas on how I can fix them? I thought I may have left something out, but I didn't. They are HORRIBLE! Cannot taste the chocolate, the peanut butter or the vanilla....just herb and very strong!!! Help!
Okay, being so new, someone else may have figured out why the weed was so rank.......guess there is a possibility that the grower did not rinse the plants for the last two weeks. Guess the guy is heavy into using chemicals to grow. Anyone have a better idea or could this be the problem??
 
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