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Curing using a Hygrometer and jar

Just wondering if anyone else has tried or is currently using this curing method? I'm currently trying it.. and was just wondering if anyone had any input on the method.

If your wondering what I'm talking about, I have posted the method below:


HYGROMETER CURING


First we will break it down into phases. This seems easiest as you can refer back to any point of the cure by phase. Try to think of it like landing an airplane...

Phase one: The dry. This is kind of like preparing to land. The first thing you want to do is come to altitude and lower your landing gear. Basically, once you cut your bud, you need to decide what to do with it. Most of us go ahead and trim it now. Once it is trimmed to our liking, the bud is hung to dry.

Phase two:
The pre-cure. This is somewhat like landing your airplane. The trick is to set it down on the runway at just the right angle as you begin to reduce your speed. This is where the mathematics come into play. What you are looking for here is the "feel". When your hanging bud begins to "feel" like it is drying out, but the stems are still flexible, it is time to jar. Don't worry, we will revisit this phase in more detail in a bit..

Phase three: The cure. Now your airplane is on the runway. This is where you are focusing on your instruments and applying the brakes. This is the actual part of the cure. It is a benefit to keep your bud in this stage for as long as possible. Actually, this may be a little misleading as some folks may like some cures better than others. In other words, this is the point where smells and flavors can change drastically. Depending on what it is you are after will dictate exactly how long you keep this phase in check. But only you can decide what you like.

Phase four: Storage. Well, the flight is over, time to put the airplane away. We have finally reached a point where the curing process has greatly slowed down and it is safe to store your bud.

Hygrometer is needed

Phase one - 70%+ RH: This starts out just like any other time you have done it. Once you have harvested your bud and trimmed it to your liking, hang it in a cool dark

place. This is where we will part from tradition. Allow it to hang until the buds begin to feel like they are drying (note the temps and rh as this will rarely be the same during

subsequent harvests). They will start to lose their "softness" in favor of a slightly crispy texture. We don't want to allow it to dry until the stems snap. THIS IS WRONG! We want

the stems to be flexible. Not totally soft, but not snapping, either. If allowed to dry until the stems snap we risk it drying too much and losing an opportunity to take full advantage

of the cure window. You see once the bud reaches the 55% RH range, the cure is dead. No amount of moisture added will revive this. If you are a brown bag dryer you can still use

this technique, although I no longer do. I feel it is unneccessary at this point in the drying process. Just make sure you do not over dry. Also, this is a perfect time to calibrate your

hygrometers with your new calibrating kit. This phase may take anywhere from 2 to 7 days depending on ambient temp, RH and strain, etc. It is important to be right on top of this

phase. Sometimes we will notice thinner stemmed buds getting done quicker. It is ok to take these first and put them in the jar. Just screw the cap on very loosely until the bulk of

the bud joins it.

Phase two - 70% to 65% RH: This is where the numbers game begins to kick in. Once you have reached the crispy bud/flexible stem stage, it is time to jar it up.

Now there are a few options here.. Really you can jar it up just like always. Only, fill your jar 3/4 to 4/5 full so you have room to use your hygrometer. You can leave it on the stem,

stem free, whatever. I personally prefer it in it's finished state, no stems. You can leave just a few stems intact for the sake of testing stem flexibility. Also, with more stems comes

more moisture. This may fit well with your style, but it also may play havoc if mold is present. Once your bud is in the jar drop in the hygrometer and cap it. Keep an eye on your

meter for the next hour or so. What we are shooting for in this phase is 70% RH maximum. If you hit 71% or greater, you will have to take the bud out to dry more. If this seems a

little tricky here, it is. The cure, even though we are still in the dry phase, has been happening to a small degree since the moment the bud was cut. Basically now we are juggling

time with mold prevention. We want to avoid any instance of mold, but we want to get every second of cure time in that we can. The goal in this phase is to start at a 70%

maximum RH and, in a timely and mold free manner, bring the RH down to about 65%. The reason I say "about" is that if there is an issue with mold (i.e. the crop was exposed to

heavy mold before and/or during harvest) we may choose to take the RH even lower, like 62%. This won't leave a huge window for curing, but it will keep the bud safe. Ideally,

however, 65% will do. Generally you can tell pretty quickly if the bud is still too wet as the hygrometer % will climb pretty quickly (rate: 1% per hour or faster). You will also notice,

at this point, that the bud will feel "wetter". That's ok. The reason for this is that while the exposed part of the bud began to dry quicker than the inside during phase one, the inside

of the bud and stems retained a good deal of their moisture. Once in the jars (phase two) that moisture can no longer be efficiently evaperated off and moved to a different area,

being replaced by dryer air. Once you have determined the RH, which may take up to 24 hours, you can begin burping the jars. This can be done at a rate of one to two hours once

or twice a day, depending on initial RH reading. Your room RH, temp, strain, exposure to mold and hygro readings will dictate this for you and wether to go faster or slower. Slower

is always better, but precipitating factors, as stated, may trump this.. Also, at the end of this stage is where most commercial bud will hit the open market, if you are lucky. The

bud at this stage should have that super sticky icky velvety feel and the 'bag appeal' will be at it's very highest.



Phase three - 65% to 60% RH:
Your buds are in the jar and RH is 65% or less. Perfect. The object of the game, as stated before, is to slowly release the moisture

from the jar over time. Your buds are now in the cure zone. At this point we are looking for a much slower release than phase two and will shift to a short burp once a week. Your

buds will deliver a nice smoke at around 60%, so the speed at which this is done (which translates directly to duration of burpage) is entirely up to you. It is at this stage that small

stems should snap in two. It is also in this stage that you will meet true stability, or equalization, in RH. What that means is that the amount of moisture in the stems is no longer

disproportionate to the buds, and moisture transfer or persperation (sweat) slows dramatically. This also means it will take much longer to get a true reading from your Hygrometer.

A true reading at this point might take up to 36 hours, but that's ok.

So, do you know what your idea of a perfect smoking bud is? If you have followed the phases as you have read them, then this is the stage where you can find out. It may be as

specific as a stationary RH value, or even a "window" between different values. Everyone one should know there ideal smoking range. I prefer mine on a slightly dryer cure, say

between 55 to 57%.


Phase four - 60% to 55%+ RH: Even though a true cure is far from over, your buds are truly ready to smoke if you wish. They are also ready to face long term

storage. As stated before, the cure dies at -55%. It is ok for the cure to be dead if you have reached your desired cure level as later remoisturing can easily bring that bud back into

your prefered smoking range. But, you can also continue the cure for long time periods and the trick to this is to stay above the 55% level. Unfortunately even claimed 'air tight' jars

will allow bud to continue losing moisture over time. The trick here is to guarantee air tightness. Simon has suggested that he jars in air tight jars and double vacuum bags it as a

way to ensure cure integrity. I am less picky. It is a good idea, though not neccessary, to leave a hygro in the jar and check it from time to time. I would start with once a week for

the first month then, if everything is stable, once every month after that should suffice.


[--- E N D O F A R T I C L E ---]



I've currently got my latest harvest (Blue Columbian) in jars curing.. and I'm using the hygrometer method I posted above. I was growing two plants, both same strain but different phenotypes. One lady was more on the Indica side and then the other lady was DEF. Sativa dom.. and she smells soooo good right now. She's got the sweetest smell to her.. I think she's the sweetest smelling Sativa that I have ever personally grown for myself. She smells of sweet fruit or candy.. almost hard to describe really, but it smells soooo good right now.

Anyhow, both plants are in their own jars. Both jars have a digital hygrometer in them. At the moment, the Sativa dom. jar is sitting right at 67% RH (which is where its been for the past 2 days according to my records).. and then the Indica girl, her RH is currently sitting right at 61%. So, therefore.. the Sativa girl is still in "Phase #2" and the Indica girl harvest is in "phase #3".. according to the article/method I'm using.

Anyhow, this is the first time I've tried this method.. so again, I was just wondering if anyone of you other growers out there have ever tried or are currently using this method.. and if so, do you have any advice?

Also, since my Indica harvest is at "Phase #3" now.. should I really only be burping the jar once per week? If so.. how long should I leave the lid off of the jar during the one burp per week? I mean, how long should the burp be?

thanks in advance.

:peace:
 

Icemud

Member of the Month: July 2012, July 2014 - Nug of the Month: July 2012

YardDog35

Plant of the Month Winner - December 2011
nobody? wow, that's hard to believe IMO.

whatever though..


figure it out on my own.. or try a different forums.


thanks for nothing. :bravo:

Why do people get so upset when they don't get a response? This is the second time in a few weeks I've seen a, boo-hoo, f you guys for not paying attention to me type of post. I just don't get it...:hmmmm:

To answer the question, yes. I can't remember who, but a reputable member here at :420: has given advice similar to that. So other people are doing it.
 

OG13

New Member
If you search the journals, you will find that 420 uses those and the Bovida (humidifier packs) for cigar humidors. Works great. The length of the burp is as long as it needs to be to get the humidity where it needs to be. Will depend on your local conditions, type of bud, how dense they are, how full the jar is, whether there is forced air exchange. Your results will vary.....
 

The Bard

Well-Known Member
I haven't used this method. I prefer the "low and slow" approach - there is a link to a long thread and discussion in my signature. But hope you are happy with your results!
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016 - Photo of the Month: Nov 2020
Once the bud reaches the 55% RH range, the cure is dead. No amount of moisture added will revive this

I read this frequently. I’ve never read any science to back it up. I’ve never noticed an obvious difference between well cured bud that was overdried in the beginning, and well cured bud that wasn’t. Haven’t tried to get scientific about testing it though.

I also question the need for constantly burping. It makes a great way to dry bud when it’s getting very close to the ideal range. But it implies some need for ‘off-gassing’ beyond just the process of lowering humidity, and I haven’t seen any evidence of that either.
I recently read a MaxYields article saying how the pressure from the offgassing builds up in the jars and you need to release the pressure every day. Total nonsense. There is zero pressure buildup even if I leave a jar sealed for months.

When my bud is dried to 60 RH on the rack, I toss it in the jar. I don’t feel any need to go ‘burping’ it if it’s dry enough. The only ‘burping’ I do is when I’m taking bud out to look at it or smoke it.

Not saying either of these ‘facts’ aren’t true- but tend to be skeptical of stoner science that gets repeated over and over without any backup.
:48:
 

Pman Sticky Ikky

Active Member
I read this frequently. I’ve never read any science to back it up. I’ve never noticed an obvious difference between well cured bud that was overdried in the beginning, and well cured bud that wasn’t. Haven’t tried to get scientific about testing it though.

I also question the need for constantly burping. It makes a great way to dry bud when it’s getting very close to the ideal range. But it implies some need for ‘off-gassing’ beyond just the process of lowering humidity, and I haven’t seen any evidence of that either.
I recently read a MaxYields article saying how the pressure from the offgassing builds up in the jars and you need to release the pressure every day. Total nonsense. There is zero pressure buildup even if I leave a jar sealed for months.

When my bud is dried to 60 RH on the rack, I toss it in the jar. I don’t feel any need to go ‘burping’ it if it’s dry enough. The only ‘burping’ I do is when I’m taking bud out to look at it or smoke it.

Not saying either of these ‘facts’ aren’t true- but tend to be skeptical of stoner science that gets repeated over and over without any backup.
:48:
Gotta say I kind of agree with you. I've gotten lots of professional grown & cured bud & the latest batch of homegrown goodness that was harvested just last week is actually smoother & the terpenes are delicious!!!! No fresh grassy smell or taste at all. Vegetation does off gas during decomposition... Not sure about you guys but my consumption out paces natural degradation. I could see burping jars if you keep loads & loads on hand but that ain't me... The new batch I do have a hydrometer in the jar because I had to get creative with odor control during drying (no carbon filter) opt'd to dry in jar with calcium chloride & a micro cooling blower to mover air. Over dried the first time, over hydrated the second & I think I have it stable now at 71% RH & around 75F I may burp this one just because the RH is a bit higher than I'd like it. But for fresh stuff I was way shocked how good the results were, with an amazing effect, & beautiful oily lemon flavor. Strong as hell too!
 

nivek

Photo of the Month: Oct 2018
How'd it go? Coming up on my 1st cure ever and want a solid process. Sorry no one responded...

gotta say,, for the second time this week i see a post directed at a thread that has not been active for over 'NINE YEARS'

strikes me a bit funny is all,,

personally,, i find i need to jar at slightly less than rh60%, or i will mold up for sure. seems i can not avoid it,, the mold, at 60 or better, even with constant burping,, so i shoot for 55%rh now, then i can relax

i have el cheapo hygrometers, two of em, the same but both read differently,, ha,, by 5 or 6%,, so i am constantly trying to guess which one is right, what a goof i be,, ha
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016 - Photo of the Month: Nov 2020
I could see burping jars if you keep loads & loads on hand

I sort of have the opposite problem where I’ve got more bud than I can smoke and not very much time to fuss over it. I would never have the time to go running around burping jars every day. Many harvests go straight in the jar and may not be checked much again for months.

As for why I am growing more bud than I can smoke, that’s a question I ask myself too- mostly just seems to fun growing it. Makes good gifts.
 

The Bard

Well-Known Member
I sort of have the opposite problem where I’ve got more bud than I can smoke and not very much time to fuss over it. I would never have the time to go running around burping jars every day. Many harvests go straight in the jar and may not be checked much again for months.

As for why I am growing more bud than I can smoke, that’s a question I ask myself too- mostly just seems to fun growing it. Makes good gifts.

I am glad I am not the only one with this "problem." I started growing for Mrs. Bard's meds, and then just started enjoying it. I give away more than we use. It makes a lot of people happier/heathier, so it is rewarding in that way. And growing is just fun.
 

andIhalped

Well-Known Member
I read this frequently. I’ve never read any science to back it up. I’ve never noticed an obvious difference between well cured bud that was overdried in the beginning, and well cured bud that wasn’t. Haven’t tried to get scientific about testing it though.

I also question the need for constantly burping. It makes a great way to dry bud when it’s getting very close to the ideal range. But it implies some need for ‘off-gassing’ beyond just the process of lowering humidity, and I haven’t seen any evidence of that either.
I recently read a MaxYields article saying how the pressure from the offgassing builds up in the jars and you need to release the pressure every day. Total nonsense. There is zero pressure buildup even if I leave a jar sealed for months.

When my bud is dried to 60 RH on the rack, I toss it in the jar. I don’t feel any need to go ‘burping’ it if it’s dry enough. The only ‘burping’ I do is when I’m taking bud out to look at it or smoke it.

Not saying either of these ‘facts’ aren’t true- but tend to be skeptical of stoner science that gets repeated over and over without any backup.
:48:
Completely agree. Have never found any "off-gassing" with curing bud. I do open my curing jars frequently during the first coupla months, but that's only to check for progress.

Am also very skeptical about the oft-repeated trope that the curing process is irreversibly ended once RH drops below 55%. Pre-retirement I spent 40+ as a professional scientist & I can't think of a single biotic or abiotic reaction for which this claim could be true. I can't rule out that this might be true but it seems very unlikely.
 
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