420 Magazine Background

Doc Bud: All Organic OG Kush SCROG

gittergreen

Plant of the Month: Jan 2013
The grow I was trying to salvage was not organic It was grown in strait happy frog in 1 gallon containers and hit hard with fox farm trio and was vegged to long. It got toxic salt build up and went all to hell. They have ended up being intersexual plants and have male staminate flowers on every bud and every plant. They arent going to pay the powerbill another words. I just always see tea recipes but nobody ever list how much of these goodies to put in. so I always just put in the amount recommended on each bag per plant.
I just love learning from you doc and others that have their proof pudding on the menu thanks, Gittergreen.
 

HighWaterMark

Active Member
. . . and back to the gnats. 420, any thought to trying Earth Juice Amazon Bloom Soil as your base? It has neem meal which falls apart into azadirachtin (neem's active insecticidal) in the soil. The theory is that the azadirachtin finds its way into the root hairs where it "blocks the molting of larvae" (see: AZADIRACHTIN). Interrupted life-cycle equals no gnats.

Thoughts?
 

Doc Bud

New Member
. . . and back to the gnats. 420, any thought to trying Earth Juice Amazon Bloom Soil as your base? It has neem meal which falls apart into azadirachtin (neem's active insecticidal) in the soil. The theory is that the azadirachtin finds its way into the root hairs where it "blocks the molting of larvae" (see: AZADIRACHTIN). Interrupted life-cycle equals no gnats.

Thoughts?

I could always just buy neem meal.

But the gnats do not cause any trouble. They're just a damn nuissance! I do not have a gnat issue this time, because of the mosquito dunks and the yucca.

I have no bug pressure of any kind right now. I haven't sprayed for spider mites in over a year. The plants have a few, here and there, but no visible damage and nothing approaching an infestation.
 

HighWaterMark

Active Member
I could always just buy neem meal.

But the gnats do not cause any trouble. They're just a damn nuissance! I do not have a gnat issue this time, because of the mosquito dunks and the yucca.

I have no bug pressure of any kind right now. I haven't sprayed for spider mites in over a year. The plants have a few, here and there, but no visible damage and nothing approaching an infestation.

I hate gnats.

It seems as though there is a systemic problem over the past two years with fungus gnats in (commercial) organic soil. I have read a couple of blogs claiming that the responsibility lies with the industry outsourcing the production/bagging industry to regions with looser environmental controls. One "whistleblower" claimed to find a high priced organic siol being bagged in a yard between a rail station and a municipal garbage dump. I just spread a blog rumor. Sorry.

The deal with the neem meal in the bag is that the azadirachtin works in the bag during the gnats' metamorphose life-cycle. Azadirachtin blocks their "ecdysone" hormones which control each switch in the life-cycle. Briefly, they spend a week as adults, during which the femals lay their eggs. The eggs hatch after four days or so into larvae which subsist on the organic materials in the bagged soil. Those that lack the refined palate for azadirachtin spin a cocoon and spend a week as pupae before they open revealing the adult.

Those that ingested any azadirachtin as larvae are theoretically done for before you rip open the top of the bag.

Plus the good reviews that Earth Juice Amazon Bloom Soil is getting make me wish you would try it. No BS; you have a much more well trained hand than I. I desperately want a cool base soil.
 

HighWaterMark

Active Member
Quick question: do you send your soil to AG Labs straight out of the bag or after you've amended it into your own super(duper)soil? Are you looking mostly for advice on weak-acid mineralization?
 

Dr.Blue

New Member
As I get nearer to having everything to mix for the "cooking" I get more anxious that I might miss something. Somewhere I saw written that you put 1 teaspoon of Borax in per 1.5 cubic foot of mix. I couldn't find that again and I did not put it in my notes for some reason, am I right or was it another amount? I also found an unused gallon of liquid compost and would like your opinion of this type of product. Locally mushroom compost is the best easy to get compost so it will make up a portion of my mix and I am thinking 1/6 part of the total mix (18 gallons), would this be about right? Is it possible to "cook" the soil too long? I would not use it before september so would it be better to wait till the first of august to mix it all up? I plan on mixing up 18 gallons of soil each in two containers.
 

Doc Bud

New Member
Quick question: do you send your soil to AG Labs straight out of the bag or after you've amended it into your own super(duper)soil? Are you looking mostly for advice on weak-acid mineralization?

I've sent soil right out of the bag and amended soil.

The last advice I got was to start with cheap top soil or peat....so I chose peat.

Most of the soils were too high in potassium, sodium and energy.
 

Doc Bud

New Member
As I get nearer to having everything to mix for the "cooking" I get more anxious that I might miss something. Somewhere I saw written that you put 1 teaspoon of Borax in per 1.5 cubic foot of mix. I couldn't find that again and I did not put it in my notes for some reason, am I right or was it another amount? I also found an unused gallon of liquid compost and would like your opinion of this type of product. Locally mushroom compost is the best easy to get compost so it will make up a portion of my mix and I am thinking 1/6 part of the total mix (18 gallons), would this be about right? Is it possible to "cook" the soil too long? I would not use it before september so would it be better to wait till the first of august to mix it all up? I plan on mixing up 18 gallons of soil each in two containers.

As long as you take it out of the can once in a while and re-mix it, there's no problem letting it cook. I've got a batch 3 months old now....no problem.

The Borax was for an older version of the super soil. I no longer include it, due to the many other sources of micro's. If your soil test came out saying you needed it, then you'd include it.
 

Dr.Blue

New Member
My soil test was comprised of going to the website and reading what they say is included. HaH! From what I can tell Sta-Green is pretty much inert but has a CRF added to it. I guess it is just a media texture that holds roots. Oddly enough I have had good results using it though the list of additives is pretty long.
 

Doc Bud

New Member
My soil test was comprised of going to the website and reading what they say is included. HaH! From what I can tell Sta-Green is pretty much inert but has a CRF added to it. I guess it is just a media texture that holds roots. Oddly enough I have had good results using it though the list of additives is pretty long.

you can grow nice plants in soil that isn't optimized for High Brix. Most people, myself included, do it every day.

However, a purpose-designed high brix soil is what I'm after. I've had good results with all kinds of mediums and soils.

You can't tell from the bag if the soil will work for High Brix or not. You've got to get it tested....no exceptions.

Having said that, just adding minerals will improve the soil and raise brix....just not to the level we're looking for.
 

Dr.Blue

New Member
I have one of the hand held microscopes for a soil inspection and it seems the soil is 3/4 wood fiber and 1/4 peat moss with a small amount of perlite added. There is also a small amount of crf's. I have time so I will look for something else.
 

Dr.Blue

New Member
Found a product called Mojogro at Mojogro.com. It is available at Kroger stores in my area and it sounds interesting. I will buy some and check it out.
 

Dr.Blue

New Member
Well another low quality product. I guess I will stick with Sta-Green, at least i can get it cheap and it seems to be made the same way every year.
 

HighWaterMark

Active Member
I guess it's time for another germination indoctrination session . . .

2.)Soak seeds for 12-24 hours in a mixture of kelp and water.....not too strong on the kelp....just follow the recipe.
Brand new seeds require less soaking than those that are a year or more old . . .

420,

I couldn't find the recipe. If you could - what type/brand and what concentration of kelp solution do you recommend?

Thanks,
HWM
 

Truth Seeker

New Member
Thanks for sharing your grow with us.

Don't forget to head over to the 420 Strain Reviews forum and post your smoke report there too! :cheer:

I'm moving this to Completed Journals now.

Have you started a new grow you would like to share with us?

If so, please start one here:
Journals in Progress

In the future, whenever you complete a journal, please use the Report Post feature found at the bottom left of every post, so we can be alerted to move it for you.

Hope all is well in your world.

Love and respect from all of us here at 420 Magazine.
 

timbeallnd

New Member
mj_grower_1.JPG

View image in gallery

Mojogro sold at Kroger is primarily intended for the consumer market (specifically for growing high brix tomato and veggies). Primarily the average consumer puts a plant into and pot and only adds straight water for the next 3-4 Months. In order to achieve best results (not changing your fertilization program) Mojogro needs to be blended with peat/coir because otherwise the nutrients levels will be way too strong. Or the grower should only add straight water for the first 3-4 weeks (if using Mojogro out of the bag). The attached picture is an example of the rooting after 3 1/2 weeks, using liquid 3-1-1 organic fertilizer, and Mojogro blended at 25% to 75% Peat/Perlite.
Mojogro is much stronger in nutrients than advertised on the back of the bag's guaranteed analysis because the organic compounds will slow release (whereas guaranteed analysis requires that only the soluble/short-term available ppm levels be advertised). Mojogro is now being used by commercial agriculture growers to blend in with peat moss for increasing yield/growth rates. The beneficial soil microbes in growing trials have shown to suppress disease and also increase the mineralization and absorption by plants of both chemical and organic nutrients.
 
Top Bottom