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Does seaweed act as a growth stimulant?

Smokin Moose

Fallen Cannabis Warrior
Seaweed extract is being marketed and supposedly has special benefits when supplied with iron. The following comments are extracted from a gardening article on use of seaweed (there are various species of seaweed which may differ in composition that influences biostimulation). "Seaweed is a rootless plant in the Fucus family that floats freely or clings to rocks by holdfasts (root-like or disk shaped plant parts that attach seaweed to rocks but don't absorb nutrients). Seaweed photosynthesizes the sunlight that reaches it through shallow water and it absorbs nutrients from sea water through its leaves. Since the ocean receives runoff from the entire earth, it contains all known minerals, trace elements, and vitamins. This primal supermarket supplies a more complete diet for sea plants than any plot of rich soil or fertilizer provides for land plants. Seaweed contains 60 or more minerals and several plant hormones. It is not however a complete fertilizer. It has a fair amount of nitrogen and potash, but very little phosphorus, a major plant nutrient.

Only a few seaweeds are harvested commercially. Norwegian kelp (Ascophyllum nodosum), a brown algae is the seaweed most used in gardening. Norwegian kelp is gathered off the coasts of England, Ireland, Norway, and both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North America where it is called rockweed. Gulfweed (Sargassum), a floating sea plant, is harvested off the coast of North Carolina. Giant kelp(Macrcystis) is collected in the Pacific Northwest.

Seaweed is constantly worn down by tides and eaten by fish, so it must grow rapidly to survive. Studies at the University of California showed that a frond of seaweed can grow a foot or more a day, given optimal conditions. The same growth hormones that prompt such rapid growth in seaweed , when applied to plants as a foliar spray, can increase the rate of cell division and elongation in those plants. The hormones also increase root growth when applied to the soil as meal or when seaweed extract is used as a root dip.

In recent turf tests at Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, plots sprayed with seaweed extract had 67% to 175% more roots than untreated plots. Plots treated in fall showed a 38% increase in spring growth over untreated plots and showed 52% more roots.

In tests at South Carolina's Clemson University, seeds soaked in liquid seaweed extract showed rapid germination, and the resulting seedlings had increased root mass and stronger plant growth than seedlings from untreated seeds. They also had a higher survival rate. Soaking plant roots in seaweed extract reduces transplant shock and speeds root growth. Seaweed foliar sprays promote faster, stronger stem and leaf growth, and earlier blossoming and fruit set when sprayed on leaves and flower buds."
 

Frog

New Member
While doing organic research, I found this tidbit :3:

Seaweed

"Gatorade for the Garden." Seaweed has been used by farmers and gardeners for hundreds of years. Here at The Natural Gardener, we recommend it for helping transplants survive and prosper through transplant shock, for encouraging more blooms, for encouraging fruit set on tomatoes and other fruits, and for helping plants to resist diseases and pests. Research has proven that regular application of seaweed can help thwart powdery mildew fungus and the spider mite pest.
 

FreakNature

New Member
Seaweed is accepted by roots everywhere. :) I don't know why you couldn't add it into the mix.
 

FreakNature

New Member
It does encourage growth of all sorts, even at the microbial level. I've used it in water for rooting and by time the cutting was ready to move on (2 weeks?) there was some fuzziness to the root ball in the water; so it is a concern. I think the benefits may outweigh the risk if it's monitored and maintained. Like anything, start with it slowly if you try it. Various manufacturers advertise seaweed extract for use in hydroponic reservoirs.

With this particular plant the roots sprang forth exuberantly and when it went into soil it took off and never looked back. In a hydro setup I've read about roots turning a light brown since the solution is similar to tea and can stain.
 

FreakNature

New Member
Well, you may be able to get the same thing (seaweed extract made from Ascophyllum Nodosum) for less money. With Delta Nueve you're paying for them telling you it's good for Cannabis. They did not invent this wheel...it's been rolling for a long time. However, I don't think you paid way too much, I just think you could have saved a few Euros or whatever by shopping a little. Either way, your return on investment should be excellent.
 

love420jen

New Member
i live in baja california on the beach, can i use this type of seaweed?
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
i live in baja california on the beach, can i use this type of seaweed?
No...raw seaweed won't give you want you need unless you take steps to process it correctly. Raw seaweed will be extremely high in salts and will make your PPM reading fluctuate wildly.
 
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