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Dying leaves

CC420710

Active Member
Okay everyone I wanted to post some pics of the bad leaves I pulled off my plant. I figured it might help someone idk because there are a few different issues. I had fungus gnats a couple weeks ago and from what I can tell they cleared a week ago though there might be more damage from deeper down. Idk if they played a part in nutrient deficiency but I did end up with deficiencies. Was thinking just nitrogen but I’m thinking it needed more of all them. I did a different ph test and it showed a little high on the two it was worst it was around 8 So added lemon juice with water. I fed them fox farm all 3, Golden tree and kelp which seemed to slow the bad down a lot. Since there were a couple different issues I will let more experienced growers to comment on pics and what they see wrong? The feeding seems to of helped the most. Also this is the third set I have clipped off so they are recently dying. So mostly we need to distinguish which is from deficiencies or gnat damage? Or if you see anything else? Also did switch to flower a couple weeks ago so that was likely the reason they needed food
 

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Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
Just want to say something, your not doing anything wrong, but when you try to adjust something to fix, make small adjustments, and only one at a time, see how the plant reacts to the adjustment then adjust from there. Once you start adjusting it with two or three things at once, you won’t truly know exactly what helped it (or made it worse)

That white powdery mildew looking stuff has me worried.

It could be White Powdery Mildew, also known as White Powdery Mold or just “WPM” to cannabis growers.
WPM is usually a minor annoyance that’s easily fixed, but if you don’t catch it early, white powdery mold can turn into a relative catastrophe that ruins an entire marijuana harvest!
Never experienced it?
Imagine circular patches of a living, breathing, fuzzy, flour-looking substance showing up on your plant’s leaves without any warning. From there, the mildew can easily spread to other leaves and buds, rendering the buds unusable.
You’ll see “powder” on your leaves
Example of white powdery mildew (WPM) on a cannabis leaf
Example of a pretty bad case of white powdery mold (WPM) on a cannabis leaf
White Powdery Mildew has such an easy time spreading that even careful growers who take proper precautions can still experience it.

There are quite a few products and homemade concoctions people use to treat WPM. Among the effective treatments are:
  • Milk (1:9 ratio of milk to water)
  • Baking soda (2 tablespoons per gallon of water)
  • Neem Oil (4 teaspoons per gallon of water)
  • Hydrogen Peroxide (1 teaspoon per gallon of 35% H202)
  • SM-90 (1:5 ratio of SM-90 to water)
Rather than go into these methods, I’m going to give you the simple strategy that is used and gets rid of White Powdery Mildew on the first try, (supposedly)
  1. White Powdery Mold: Ruiner of beautiful plants.
    Remove White Powdery Mildew from leaves – Get some water (tap water works fine) and some paper towels. Wet the paper towels and use them to gently wipe the mildew off the affected leaves whilst being careful not to jostle any leaves with spores on them. Using a wet cloth will ensure that more spores stick to the cloth instead of becoming airborne. Note: While it isn’t necessary to use paper towels, their disposability helps to curb the spread of spores from one leaf to another.
  2. Ensure plants have proper airflow and ventilation – Even if you have absolutely no airflow or ventilation in your grow room, having even two fans will drastically reduce your chances of encountering WPM while also benefitting your plants overall health. One fan should be oscillating if possible and should gently blow air over your plants. All the plants need is enough air to gently rustle their leaves. The second fan should be in your grow room pointing outward, pulling heat away from your plants (only needed if you have no ventilation). Having a fan pointing out of your grow room will force old air out of the room, and in turn, pull new air into the room. At this point, you’ll have new air coming in, being used and circulated, then kicked out. Keep in mind that two fans is a minimum.
  3. Treat plant with SM90 to kill spores prevent future growth – Mix 1 part SM90 to 5 parts water(I’ve found 7 parts water to be equally effective) in a clean sprayer/mister. Wait until just before your lights for off for the day and mist your (newly cleaned) plants. Get all the leaves! This diluted SM90 mixed will kill any spores it touches, and anywhere it lands becomes uninhabitable for future spores. Plus, it’s safe to use – even during flowering – and it smells awesome.
 

CC420710

Active Member
Just want to say something, your not doing anything wrong, but when you try to adjust something to fix, make small adjustments, and only one at a time, see how the plant reacts to the adjustment then adjust from there. Once you start adjusting it with two or three things at once, you won’t truly know exactly what helped it (or made it worse)

That white powdery mildew looking stuff has me worried.

It could be White Powdery Mildew, also known as White Powdery Mold or just “WPM” to cannabis growers.
WPM is usually a minor annoyance that’s easily fixed, but if you don’t catch it early, white powdery mold can turn into a relative catastrophe that ruins an entire marijuana harvest!
Never experienced it?
Imagine circular patches of a living, breathing, fuzzy, flour-looking substance showing up on your plant’s leaves without any warning. From there, the mildew can easily spread to other leaves and buds, rendering the buds unusable.
You’ll see “powder” on your leaves
Example of white powdery mildew (WPM) on a cannabis leaf
Example of a pretty bad case of white powdery mold (WPM) on a cannabis leaf
White Powdery Mildew has such an easy time spreading that even careful growers who take proper precautions can still experience it.

There are quite a few products and homemade concoctions people use to treat WPM. Among the effective treatments are:
  • Milk (1:9 ratio of milk to water)
  • Baking soda (2 tablespoons per gallon of water)
  • Neem Oil (4 teaspoons per gallon of water)
  • Hydrogen Peroxide (1 teaspoon per gallon of 35% H202)
  • SM-90 (1:5 ratio of SM-90 to water)
Rather than go into these methods, I’m going to give you the simple strategy that is used and gets rid of White Powdery Mildew on the first try, (supposedly)
  1. White Powdery Mold: Ruiner of beautiful plants.
    Remove White Powdery Mildew from leaves – Get some water (tap water works fine) and some paper towels. Wet the paper towels and use them to gently wipe the mildew off the affected leaves whilst being careful not to jostle any leaves with spores on them. Using a wet cloth will ensure that more spores stick to the cloth instead of becoming airborne. Note: While it isn’t necessary to use paper towels, their disposability helps to curb the spread of spores from one leaf to another.
  2. Ensure plants have proper airflow and ventilation – Even if you have absolutely no airflow or ventilation in your grow room, having even two fans will drastically reduce your chances of encountering WPM while also benefitting your plants overall health. One fan should be oscillating if possible and should gently blow air over your plants. All the plants need is enough air to gently rustle their leaves. The second fan should be in your grow room pointing outward, pulling heat away from your plants (only needed if you have no ventilation). Having a fan pointing out of your grow room will force old air out of the room, and in turn, pull new air into the room. At this point, you’ll have new air coming in, being used and circulated, then kicked out. Keep in mind that two fans is a minimum.
  3. Treat plant with SM90 to kill spores prevent future growth – Mix 1 part SM90 to 5 parts water(I’ve found 7 parts water to be equally effective) in a clean sprayer/mister. Wait until just before your lights for off for the day and mist your (newly cleaned) plants. Get all the leaves! This diluted SM90 mixed will kill any spores it touches, and anywhere it lands becomes uninhabitable for future spores. Plus, it’s safe to use – even during flowering – and it smells awesome.
I put diatomaceous earth out everywhere when battling fungus gnats and there is still residue in spots from that. At least I hope I'm right I did cover everything good. I have been using neem oil for the most part but between the two the gnats were cleared out. I know that it helps to narrow down they were just dying at such a fast rate I didn't want to take any chances of getting worse. I'm sorry that I made it difficult there I was just really worried this time
 

CC420710

Active Member
I put diatomaceous earth out everywhere when battling fungus gnats and there is still residue in spots from that. At least I hope I'm right I did cover everything good. I have been using neem oil for the most part but between the two the gnats were cleared out. I know that it helps to narrow down they were just dying at such a fast rate I didn't want to take any chances of getting worse. I'm sorry that I made it difficult there I was just really worried this time
Also, I just gave them there regular feeding of npk a few days ago which slowed it down a lot. I just added lemon juice last night to try and lower ph in the two pushing 8. I'm not sure if it was just needing due to the switch to flower or ph? I'm going with the first because the feeding helped a lot and if it was the ph being high wouldn't it continue lockout despite the feeding? Also, think your blt explanation could be part of it. Me not getting it even everywhere. So I guess my question now is why did they need more? PH, switching to flower, gnats or blt?
 

Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
I’m a lil confused, I think your trying too many things at once, one thing could be treating one thing and then, attacking it with another.

You should get your self a bottle of ph down, as it’s not often you have to raise it up, if so add a lil more water to raise it back to what you need.

You said you flipped to flower about two weeks ago? Would it maybe be smart to reverse it back to veg, and deal with these problems before going into flower? I would say dealing with the white mildew before anything, as you don’t want that to get any worse.
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
Okay everyone I wanted to post some pics of the bad leaves I pulled off my plant.

One comment- the plants use those older fan leaves to draw nutrients from to give to the newer growth, when there is an overall shortage of some nutrients.

That’s why those deficiencies are showing up.
They aren’t ‘bad leaves’ they’re actually good leaves, doing their job.

Pulling the leaves off not only obviously removes the many other benefits those leaves provide, it removes them as a nutrient source and the plant will just have to start depleting other leaves.
So it might make the grower feel temporarily better to remove them, but it’s really not helping.
 
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Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
One comment- the plants use those older fan leaves to draw nutrients from to give to the newer growth, when there is an overall shortage of some nutrients.

That’s why those deficiencies are showing up.
They aren’t ‘bad leaves’ they’re actually good leaves, doing their job.

Pulling the leaves off not only removes the benefits the leaves normally provide (obviously), it removes those ones as a nutrient source and the plant will just have to start depleting other leaves.
So it might make the grower feel temporarily better to remove them, but it’s really not helping.
Yes exactly! Thank you!! Well said! :thumb::high-five:
 

CC420710

Active Member
One comment- the plants use those older fan leaves to draw nutrients from to give to the newer growth, when there is an overall shortage of some nutrients.

That’s why those deficiencies are showing up.
They aren’t ‘bad leaves’ they’re actually good leaves, doing their job.

Pulling the leaves off not only removes the benefits the leaves normally provide (obviously), it removes those ones as a nutrient source and the plant will just have to start depleting other leaves.
So it might make the grower feel temporarily better to remove them, but it’s really not helping.
Nice to know for future but it"s not the cause of the original problem as I didn't"t clip anything until the after the problem appeared. Whether or not it helps the recovery is a different story and with that, your comment makes a lot of sense. What caused the problem, to begin with, is what I'm trying to figure out? Is it because I switched to flower and they needed more? or do gnats affect nutrient levels? or did the treatment I used cause any ph changes by going up? I know that the regular feeding I gave a few nights ago benefited them the most. Which makes me lean toward deficiencies. Also, I have been giving less than recommended as I'm learning the balance so I don't burn them. I know there seems to be confusion in areas so I will add to this post a better timeline of everything done to better explain hopefully. But thank you for your comment as it is helpful to their recovery
 

CC420710

Active Member
Okay, I'm want to try and break this down better as I seem to be causing confusion and I apologize though I have learned a few things from everyone regardless. Okay to start 2 weeks ago I switched to flower phase and around the same time I noticed I had fungus gnats which killed my baby. I then spent the next week trying to get rid of them with dematiaceous earth (which is the white stuff you see as I spread everywhere) and neem oil. At first, I just did spray but later in week learned about soil drench with neem. The next week (second week of flower) the gnat problem seemed to be under control and still not a lot of damage to bigger plants. A few days later (3-4) days ago I noticed the leaves turning yellow and dying and continues to though it has slowed down a lot. After a couple of days of that, I then fed them nutrients (Fox Farm trio, golden tree, milk, and Epson salt also eggshells ( which won't breakdown enough to help yet). Since then it has slowed down. It's more in spots instead of whole leaf yellowing at once. I hope this clears up any confusion if not please let me know and I will try my best
 

CC420710

Active Member
Yes- deficiencies. Not ph.
I don’t know anything about gnats but I doubt it.
My plants show similar issues if left underfed for too long.
Yes- deficiencies. Not ph.
I don’t know anything about gnats but I doubt it.
My plants show similar issues if left underfed for too long.
Added a new comment to post to hopefully explain better. I apologize for any confusion
 

Weaselcracker

Nug of the Year: 2016 - Member of the Month: Sept 2015, Nov 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2016 - Plant of the Month: May 2016
I’m not a great deficiencies expert myself, but for people in general to make an educated guess they’d need to know what medium you’re growing in, your feeding schedule, and have some pics of the entire plant(s) to show a better picture.
 

Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
What caused the problem, to begin with, is what I'm trying to figure out? Is it because I switched to flower and they needed more? or do gnats affect nutrient levels? or did the treatment I used cause any ph changes by going up? I know that the regular feeding I gave a few nights ago benefited them the most. Which makes me lean toward deficiencies. Also, I have been giving less than recommended as I'm learning the balance so I don't burn them. I know there seems to be confusion in areas so I will add to this post a better timeline of everything done to better explain hopefully. But thank you for your comment as it is helpful to their recovery
I’m sorry I think I’m following you a bit better here. No need to apologize for your behalf.

Switching to flower and needing more shouldn’t be the problem at all. Once flipped and they enter the first stretch stage of flowering they should a bloom of some sort added to the regimen. Not saying that’s the problem either, again I’m no nutrient expert either, so I’m just going off of what I know.

Gnats shouldn’t affect nutrient levels, they tend to attack the plant not the nutrients. It could have helped to why the plant is to what it is today, but shouldn’t be the main reason.

I’m thinking that it was just under fed nutrients after first going into flower which caused the yellowing.

That white stuff you have for gnats I’ve never heard of so I can’t tell you anything about it, but some yellow sticky traps and some spray solution should cover that up.

I’m thinking your first problem was under feeding, then the problem escalated by trying too many things at the same time with not enough time in between to see how the plants reacts to them.

Take a breather bro, slow down, relax! It’s ok! Let’s keep things simple here lol
 

CC420710

Active Member
Okay as someone pointed out I need to give more details for learning purposes. I am growing in a mix of black gold organic soil, peat moss, and vermiculite. I have been using fox farm trio about half recommended dose with golden tree and alternate feedings between it and kelp. Water Every 3-4 days. Adding more pics to help please let me know if I left anything needed out
 

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CC420710

Active Member
I’m sorry I think I’m following you a bit better here. No need to apologize for your behalf.

Switching to flower and needing more shouldn’t be the problem at all. Once flipped and they enter the first stretch stage of flowering they should a bloom of some sort added to the regimen. Not saying that’s the problem either, again I’m no nutrient expert either, so I’m just going off of what I know.

Gnats shouldn’t affect nutrient levels, they tend to attack the plant not the nutrients. It could have helped to why the plant is to what it is today, but shouldn’t be the main reason.

I’m thinking that it was just under fed nutrients after first going into flower which caused the yellowing.

That white stuff you have for gnats I’ve never heard of so I can’t tell you anything about it, but some yellow sticky traps and some spray solution should cover that up.

I’m thinking your first problem was under feeding, then the problem escalated by trying too many things at the same time with not enough time in between to see how the plants reacts to them.

Take a breather bro, slow down, relax! It’s ok! Let’s keep things simple here lol
From everything I have got back I agree. At first I was thinking nitrogen but there were other signs that point toward phosphorus or potassium which made me think it needed all three. I read that they need more phosphorus in flower stage and they started making flowers over a week ago. I also read they need nitrogen at that time also.
 

Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
I am unsure to what caused the white mildew though, and it worries me, and I would suggest dealing with it before anything. I’m so sorry your dealing with all of these problems. I wish your experience was going smoother for you.
 

CC420710

Active Member
I’m a lil confused, I think your trying too many things at once, one thing could be treating one thing and then, attacking it with another.

You should get your self a bottle of ph down, as it’s not often you have to raise it up, if so add a lil more water to raise it back to what you need.

You said you flipped to flower about two weeks ago? Would it maybe be smart to reverse it back to veg, and deal with these problems before going into flower? I would say dealing with the white mildew before anything, as you don’t want that to get any worse.
Idk can you switch back after flowers start forming? I have no idea in that area
 

Backlipslide

Well-Known Member
Idk can you switch back after flowers start forming? I have no idea in that area
You can do it, fresh into flower but I’m unsure to when that point is, to when your at the point of no return. If that makes sense :hmmmm:
 
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