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electrical problems

sleeze406

New Member
I have to run 4000 watts in my garage can i split it up to different outlets around the room or do i need to put in new outlets to there own breakers
 

FreakNature

New Member
To figure out how big your circuit breaker needs to be for a 4000 watt load (assuming the load is constant - lights or fans), it's 4000x125%=5000/120(volts)=41.67 amps.

Your outlets in the garage are probably all on one 15 amp circuit. You can have a total of 1400 amps constant load on the garage circuit divided among all outlets (or all on one outlet and blank-off the other outlets). 1400x1.25/120=14.58amps

You'll probably need (2) more 15 amp circuits (new breakers in the breaker box and feed new wires to new outlets), minimum.

The 1.25 factor (125%) is to accommodate the heat generated in the breakers for continuous loads, by code.

I'm not an electrician. There's a good book Home Depot may still sell in the electrical section (green paperback - "Wiring Simplified") that I recommend.
 

ol hippy

New Member
I'd just get an electrician and add a 50 watt service !! No worrys' and it's done right !! Cost about the same as another light fixture . You can even put a separate junction box right near your grow room ..
 

Hogdady

Plant of the Month: June 2010 - Nug of the Month: July 2010
I have to run 4000 watts in my garage can i split it up to different outlets around the room or do i need to put in new outlets to there own breakers

if you are planning on running 4-1kw lites, the total wattage exceeds 4kw due to the efficiency of the ballasts. magnetic ballasts are a little less efficient than electronic or digital. if you have 4-1kw magnetic ballasts, the total wattage will be closer to 4500 watts. this is equal to roughly 40 amps @ 120 volts. you should never exceed 80% continuous load of your breaker rating. that means you would need 3 separate circuits to handle that load @ 120 volts. if you change your ballasts to run on 240 volts, that will cut your amperage in half. :ganjamon:
 

sleeze406

New Member
I'm in western MT but if i run my lights on 240 will it use less electricity since it cuts the watts in half or dose it use the same
 

Baja Big Dog

New Member
To figure out how big your circuit breaker needs to be for a 4000 watt load (assuming the load is constant - lights or fans), it's 4000x125%=5000/120(volts)=41.67 amps.

Your outlets in the garage are probably all on one 15 amp circuit. You can have a total of 1400 amps constant load on the garage circuit divided among all outlets (or all on one outlet and blank-off the other outlets). 1400x1.25/120=14.58amps

You'll probably need (2) more 15 amp circuits (new breakers in the breaker box and feed new wires to new outlets), minimum.

The 1.25 factor (125%) is to accommodate the heat generated in the breakers for continuous loads, by code.

I'm not an electrician. There's a good book Home Depot may still sell in the electrical section (green paperback - "Wiring Simplified") that I recommend.

Good advice, but do get the book, these numbers are based on 120 volt ballasts, running them at 220 will reduce your required currant by 1/2, along with the size of wire etc, is your panel near your garage? If so you can pull this off yourself without much effort.
 

sleeze406

New Member
ya i think so i have a friend that can wire in a 50amp and then a couple of 30 amps do you no if its up to code to run it through conduit across my ceiling instead of through my crawl space
 

Hogdady

Plant of the Month: June 2010 - Nug of the Month: July 2010
Is emt conduit up to code? I don't know.

Is it safe? Absolutely!
 

Proliferation

New Member
so have you received the info you need?

Hogdady-- I've seen you comment on 240v situations in the past and you seem to know your stuff in that area so I'm directing this question to you although I encourage all (with helpful info) to chime in.

I am setting up a new grow space for myself right now and plan to run all my lights on 240. This will be my first experience with 240v and the more I learn about it the more excited I am.

The room is currently a mix of two circuits; 1-120v curcuit on 20amp breaker and 1-240v circuit but am not entirely sure what breaker electrician wired it to panel (he's coming back tomorrow and I already have a million questions for him lol). My plan was to run approx 1,000CMF in line fan, couple timmers on the 120v curcuit and then run all my lights off the 240v curcuit. Just in doing the math alone it seems like putting 4-1Kwatt lights on that 240v curcuit will be about maxing it out. Could I get away with this as is? any thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks!
 

Baja Big Dog

New Member
Hogdady-- I've seen you comment on 240v situations in the past and you seem to know your stuff in that area so I'm directing this question to you although I encourage all (with helpful info) to chime in.

I am setting up a new grow space for myself right now and plan to run all my lights on 240. This will be my first experience with 240v and the more I learn about it the more excited I am.

The room is currently a mix of two circuits; 1-120v curcuit on 20amp breaker and 1-240v circuit but am not entirely sure what breaker electrician wired it to panel (he's coming back tomorrow and I already have a million questions for him lol). My plan was to run approx 1,000CMF in line fan, couple timmers on the 120v curcuit and then run all my lights off the 240v curcuit. Just in doing the math alone it seems like putting 4-1Kwatt lights on that 240v curcuit will be about maxing it out. Could I get away with this as is? any thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks!

Not Hog, but a few questions come up..

The first thing some of preach is ...Before you buy a light, before you buy a fan, before you buy a PH meter....BUY A CALCULATOR!!! AND USE IT TO CALCULATE THE REQUIRED AMPS REGARDLESS OF THE VOLTAGE!!
A properly sized circuit will allow for excessive draw over design, but its not recommended...
At 8 amps per light (only guessing, dont know what lights you are using) your total load on the 240 circuit would be 24 amps, if its a 30 amp service, your golden, if its a 20 amp circuit, you better re-think your room!!

Also be advised, at that load, your meter is gonna need new bearings !!!(I know...old school with the wheels) If your planning on running stealth, your screwed, your bill is go out of sight!!
I dont know of a state you can legally grow that much pot in.

Did the electrician add an additional 240v circuit? Is he an electrician?
 

Hogdady

Plant of the Month: June 2010 - Nug of the Month: July 2010
Hogdady-- I've seen you comment on 240v situations in the past and you seem to know your stuff in that area so I'm directing this question to you although I encourage all (with helpful info) to chime in.

I am setting up a new grow space for myself right now and plan to run all my lights on 240. This will be my first experience with 240v and the more I learn about it the more excited I am.

The room is currently a mix of two circuits; 1-120v curcuit on 20amp breaker and 1-240v circuit but am not entirely sure what breaker electrician wired it to panel (he's coming back tomorrow and I already have a million questions for him lol). My plan was to run approx 1,000CMF in line fan, couple timmers on the 120v curcuit and then run all my lights off the 240v curcuit. Just in doing the math alone it seems like putting 4-1Kwatt lights on that 240v curcuit will be about maxing it out. Could I get away with this as is? any thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks!

sounds like your system is very similar to mine. in regards to the lights, they are gonna pull roughly 5 amps per light @ 240vac. so your lamp circuit draw is 20 amps continuous. it would be unsafe to try and pull 20 amps continuous from a 20 amp breaker, so you are gonna need 30 amp breakers for your 240vac light circuit. fyi there will be two breakers linked together for your 240v circuit. good luck!
 
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