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Exceptionally High FECO Yields

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
The first two cultivars of our next study have popped thru the surface. We have a stout looking Northern Lights we will call NL #1, and a small but pretty Ocean Grown Girl Scout Cookies we will call GSC #1. When the seedlings were buried we had not yet observed a tap root for the second GSC. We will watch but not replace her, (should she fail) as we really only are set for 5 scrog plants. :peace:
Good choices!
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019
Straw Hat Chat,
dwc? is that wick hydro?

I am trying to find out if anybody can observe offering any nutrient to a plant and the plant refuses the nute but uptakes water. This answer I believe is yes, we can see a plant not eat what we offer it, but it drinks the water. If that is true the organism has a system of differentiating what and how much it will consume. If that is true, that the plants control what they eat and how much.. then why do we think our overfeeding of the plant is a problem if the plant controls intake? That is where I was headed.

@InTheShed had talked with me before about this. My guy who has a cup under his belt and has published a book on caanibis cultivation under LED assures me a plant unlike your puppy will not eat to its demise. I know this is a point of contention but it is not designed to be one.

I burn leaves also, but are we reading the plant wrong?
not looking to argue, looking to learn is all. :peace:
In a synthetic grow, we decide what to give the plants. The nutes that we mix up are in a form that is ready to be taken directly up into the plant, essentially the same form that would be handed off by microbes in an organic grow. We supply the nutrient mix, and the roots suck up what is mobile, ie, whatever is in the correct pH range to become mobile. The plants have no say in this decision process. We supply it, they suck it up and that is that... there is no process for the plants to tell us what they want or need, we just throw it at them in a usable form and because of that, we can give too much, not enough or give a mix missing vital elements that might be needed at the time.

In an organic grow, there is nothing of this readily available form of nutrients in the soil, water or anything else. We are force feeding the plants nothing. Water is still sucked up as needed, but the feeding process is completely different, and is controlled by the plant. The plant's roots exude a substance that tells the microbes in the soil exactly what nutrients the plant is looking for. The reward for a microbe bringing that substance to the plant is a symbiotic exchange of exudate for nutrient. The microbe gets its reward and then goes out looking for more raw element. Some of our microbes are very efficient, ie, they eat an element, and 70% of it turns into a usable form for the plants. In this process the plant is totally controlling the nutrition it is getting, both in form and quantity.
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
In a synthetic grow, we decide what to give the plants. The nutes that we mix up are in a form that is ready to be taken directly up into the plant, essentially the same form that would be handed off by microbes in an organic grow. We supply the nutrient mix, and the roots suck up what is mobile, ie, whatever is in the correct pH range to become mobile. The plants have no say in this decision process. We supply it, they suck it up and that is that... there is no process for the plants to tell us what they want or need, we just throw it at them in a usable form and because of that, we can give too much, not enough or give a mix missing vital elements that might be needed at the time.

In an organic grow, there is nothing of this readily available form of nutrients in the soil, water or anything else. We are force feeding the plants nothing. Water is still sucked up as needed, but the feeding process is completely different, and is controlled by the plant. The plant's roots exude a substance that tells the microbes in the soil exactly what nutrients the plant is looking for. The reward for a microbe bringing that substance to the plant is a symbiotic exchange of exudate for nutrient. The microbe gets its reward and then goes out looking for more raw element. Some of our microbes are very efficient, ie, they eat an element, and 70% of it turns into a usable form for the plants. In this process the plant is totally controlling the nutrition it is getting, both in form and quantity.
Thanks for that well thought out explanation. The pieces are getting more aligned now some days :).
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
In a synthetic grow, we decide what to give the plants. The nutes that we mix up are in a form that is ready to be taken directly up into the plant, essentially the same form that would be handed off by microbes in an organic grow. We supply the nutrient mix, and the roots suck up what is mobile, ie, whatever is in the correct pH range to become mobile. The plants have no say in this decision process. We supply it, they suck it up and that is that... there is no process for the plants to tell us what they want or need, we just throw it at them in a usable form and because of that, we can give too much, not enough or give a mix missing vital elements that might be needed at the time.

In an organic grow, there is nothing of this readily available form of nutrients in the soil, water or anything else. We are force feeding the plants nothing. Water is still sucked up as needed, but the feeding process is completely different, and is controlled by the plant. The plant's roots exude a substance that tells the microbes in the soil exactly what nutrients the plant is looking for. The reward for a microbe bringing that substance to the plant is a symbiotic exchange of exudate for nutrient. The microbe gets its reward and then goes out looking for more raw element. Some of our microbes are very efficient, ie, they eat an element, and 70% of it turns into a usable form for the plants. In this process the plant is totally controlling the nutrition it is getting, both in form and quantity.
Thanks Emilya,
I was telling @stoneotter that some day I hope to muster the courage to give it a try. Being a hobbit like guy you would figure I would grow more hobbitually. Is it expensive to get started?
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Straw Hat notes;
So I was a little spooked my oil was not up to par so I asked some experts @Grandpa Tokin and @Old Salt for help. I have since made another batch of sugar leaf with some popcorn amounting to 44 grams at final air dry weight. Using my improved methods we just nailed 6.3 grams of fully or way more than before decarbed. Thats just under 15% return only running sugar. The flower runs are gonna be awesome. The smoke itself is tastier than I expected and of course very sedative even though it was a "pure" sativa. Late flower drought kicks ! :peace:
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019
Thanks Emilya,
I was telling @stoneotter that some day I hope to muster the courage to give it a try. Being a hobbit like guy you would figure I would grow more hobbitually. Is it expensive to get started?
No, its not that bad, especially if you are used to buying nutes for a run, because that need will go away. When I started with the supersoil years ago it cost me about $125 to have amazon ship me all of the raw ingredients that I needed, and from then on there was no major expense to have a grow other than a bottle of this or that to experiment with or little things I needed for teas and such... but over time this becomes the very cheapest way to grow that there is.
 

Grandpa Tokin

Member of the Month: Apr 2018 - Nug of the Month: Feb 2019
Straw Hat notes;
So I was a little spooked my oil was not up to par so I asked some experts @Grandpa Tokin and @Old Salt for help. I have since made another batch of sugar leaf with some popcorn amounting to 44 grams at final air dry weight. Using my improved methods we just nailed 6.3 grams of fully or way more than before decarbed. Thats just under 15% return only running sugar. The flower runs are gonna be awesome. The smoke itself is tastier than I expected and of course very sedative even though it was a "pure" sativa. Late flower drought kicks ! :peace:
Wow! That’s great. I like hearing that. What was the strain again? 15% return on trim is pretty darn good bud. Love it!
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Wow! That’s great. I like hearing that. What was the strain again? 15% return on trim is pretty darn good bud. Love it!
This strain was called Forest Dream by Dutch Passion. They did not disclose genetics (pure sativa, haha) but said I was going to like it. They underestimated my appreciation. Awesome strain. Jumps a bunch during stretch so I had to deploy a second tier scrog as they blasted through normal 10 inch high screens. One phenotype was ready in around 50 days of flower while a second slower pheno looks for love much longer ~ 65 days. Both produce fine cultivars even in my hillbilly garden. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Sitting on the ground in the back yard looking at a big blue tarp spread out in the sunshine. Laying on the tarp is a couple hundred pounds of my medium being prepared for our next study. Thinking I used to be proud of my mixture being formulated from a budget that is embarrassingly too small. I reuse medium and reconstitute it with some new stuff. MYZ is way overpriced but @InTheShed runs it, so I will save up for some also. But for now we got around 50% coco coir, 30 % FFOF, 10 % Perlite, 10% organic worm casings. I use JR Peters fertilizers also really cheap. I think all the fancy stuff is better but I don't got that kind of money, but if I did :) I would get Fox 3 pack and call it good.

I want an organic garden now. Dang :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
When running organic utilizing a live medium, after a grow what happens to your medium? Can anything be reused, or do you need a fresh batch for each run? @stoneotter I think said he bought a premix. Does anyone have a list of supplies needed for a home made batch like @Emilya runs?

@InTheShed my brother, are you into hobbits? JR Tolkien is my favorite story teller. The Avatar I am running is the mark of Mithrandir. In the movies they called him Gandalf. Remember my early stoner years reading the hobbit out in the orange groves of southern California. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Not a book reader myself. I gave up reading books when they were no longer being assigned by professors!
I have noticed my reading has taken a biological twist, although I am not being told to read it. I have a proven track record of not being to good at following instructions. Are those links under your name for the no flush club? I have never flushed, but not because I know why not to do it. Can I pay a visit?
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
They are indeed. The first link is to a 420mag post on why it's not possible to flush nutrients from your buds before harvest, and the second is a pdf study that proves it.
LOL
noticed Caplan's doctoral thesis was applied to same school.
small world
I should try to get us a school contact, maybe see what new stuff is in the pipes?
Hey, maybe we get lucky.

The correct decarb of my oil could not have come at a better time. OMG my wife had shoulder surgery yesterday and has made it clear I am her servant for next three months. DECARB, take me away! :peace:
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
When running organic utilizing a live medium, after a grow what happens to your medium? Can anything be reused, or do you need a fresh batch for each run? @stoneotter I think said he bought a premix. Does anyone have a list of supplies needed for a home made batch like @Emilya runs?

@InTheShed my brother, are you into hobbits? JR Tolkien is my favorite story teller. The Avatar I am running is the mark of Mithrandir. In the movies they called him Gandalf. Remember my early stoner years reading the hobbit out in the orange groves of southern California. :peace:
Hey Maritimer. I re-use the soil. I add all the roots and a list of amendments and cook it for a month or 3 weeks. The book is down in the grow room and I'm done so I can't tell you the components now. True Living Organics by The Rev is where the recipe is from.
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
LOL
noticed Caplan's doctoral thesis was applied to same school.
small world
I should try to get us a school contact, maybe see what new stuff is in the pipes?
Hey, maybe we get lucky.

The correct decarb of my oil could not have come at a better time. OMG my wife had shoulder surgery yesterday and has made it clear I am her servant for next three months. DECARB, take me away! :peace:
Take good care of your poor wife. Ouch. Hope she heals quick!
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
Forgive me for the upside down pic. My tech skill is not here today. This is the original mix that gets grown in.
1871451
1871449

The following is added when the plant is harvested and roots munched up and mixed in to compost while cooking.
Recycling soil recipe
1871452

Unacceptable, hope to get a better copy later.
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
Better copy original recipe x 3. The start. I'll get back for the amendments.

LOS V2.2 3 x Batch Recipe



18 gal (3cu ft) organic soil mix.





6 gal coco coir





12 gal pearlite or 1/2 pearlite half vermiculite.





12 gal earthworm castings





1 1/2 cup grow or bloom by organicare dry. or 3 cups 5-5-5 all purpose





1 1/2 cup green sand





1 1/2 cup ground oyster shells. or 4.5 cups crushed if no ground.





2.25 cups crushed oyster shell. or 3/4 ground if no crushed





3 cups dolomite lime. or 6 cups prilled if no powdered.





3 cups prilled. or 1 cup powdered if no prilled.





3/4 cup blood meal





1 1/2 cup high N bat guano. like 9-3-1





6 cups feather meal 3/4 cup soft rock phosphate. 2 1/4 cup rock phosphate granular if no powdered.





6 cups feather meal





6 cups bone meal.





3/4 cup powdered soft rock phosphate 2 1/4 cups granular if no powdered.





1 1/2 cups gypsum powdered. or 3 cups granular.





9 cups kelp meal





6 cups alfalfa meal or up to 3 times more.





1 1/2 cups azomite granular. or 9 heaping tablespoons powdered if no granular





3/4 cup humid acid ore.





3 cups rice





6 cups manure
 
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