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Exceptionally High FECO Yields

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Ethephon; Trade names for products containing ethephon include Arvest, Bromeflor, Etheverse, Flordimex, Flordimex T-Extra, Cerone, Etherel, Chipco Florel Pro and Prep (4, 10).

Ethephon is a naturally occuring growth hormone. If you ever placed an apple in with fruit to encourage ripening, you were using ethepon gas given off by the apple.

Farmers growing cotton depend on ethepon to open mature bolls to enable harvest before fiber deteriorates.

Ethephon is converted into ethelene inside the plant. If you want to avoid ethephon spayed figs you might as well avoid store bought pineapple,apple, blueberry, tomato,cherries,grapes, and a world of other fruits and vegetables. It is labeled for and used on all mentioned.

" Ethephon is corrosive in acute dermal irritation studies using rabbits, has the potential to cause eye irritation, and has been placed in Toxicity Category I (the highest of four categories) for these effects. It is moderately acutely toxic by the oral, dermal and inhalation routes (Toxicity Category III), and does not cause skin sensitization. "
https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem...1_1-Apr-95.pdf

Another paper published by the EPA in 2006 says that
" On average about 4.1 million pounds of ethephon are used annually on 1.7 million acres. The crops with highest percent crop treated are tart cherries (61%), grapes (40%), processed tomatoes (15%), and cotton (10%). "

"The toxicity database for ethephon is adequate for the selection of doses and endpoints for use in risk assessment. Ethephon (an organophosphonate) produces organophosphate-like signs of toxicity including salivation, lacrimation, urination and defecation. These toxic signs occur in experimental animals usually at high doses of exposure. The most sensitive indicator of exposure to ethephon is the inhibition of red blood cell and plasma cholinesterase which occurs at low levels of exposure and may not be accompanied by clinical signs of toxicity until a threshold level of exposure is reached."

https://archive.epa.gov/pesticides/r...ephon_tred.pdf

Dang!
I am worried about usin this stuff in our grows but we eat the stuff.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Straw Hat Notes;

Via SDPP abstract

Grafting cultivation could enhance the resistance to many biotic and abiotic stresses in tomato grafted seedlings. In order to further study the molecular mechanism of ABA signaling regulation in tomatoes grafted onto different rootstocks under drought stress, the different drought-resistance tomato varieties named drought-tolerant genotypes (T) and drought-sensitive genotypes (S), were selected for grafting with each other as rootstock or scion, and the response to drought stress were tested. And then whole transcriptome sequencing performed with the leaves and roots of S/T and S/S grafted tomato seedlings under drought stress. The results showed that, compared with seedlings grafted with S, the growth rate and stomatal aperture of seedlings grafted onto T were not significantly inhibited by drought and the ABA content increased after 15 days of drought stress. The roots had more DEGs in the functional category associated with plant hormone signal transduction than the leaves, and most of the genes were upregulated in S/T vs. S/S. The DEGs involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABA signaling both had impact on the drought resistance of grafted tomato with different rootstocks. Compared with ABA biosynthesis, there were more DEGs related to ABA signal transduction in different grafting treatments. They together regulated ABA content and stomatal aperture of the plant and allow it adapt to drought stress in time.

Ok need to think about this a few :peace:
 
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Graytail

Plant of the Year: 2014 - Plant of the Month: Dec 2014 - Nug of the Month: Feb 2015, Mar & Aug 2016, Dec 2017, Aug 2018, Jan 2019 - Nug of the Year: 2017 - Photo of the Month: June 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Oh heck!
@Graytail you are my man. Your on my Christmas list for sure :)
This evenings research will involve Light Addict's thread and some bong hits so I can feel the knowledge.

Wife says I need a lab coat LOL.
probably thinking a straight jacket more likely. :peace:
 
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InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Graytail

Plant of the Year: 2014 - Plant of the Month: Dec 2014 - Nug of the Month: Feb 2015, Mar & Aug 2016, Dec 2017, Aug 2018, Jan 2019 - Nug of the Year: 2017 - Photo of the Month: June 2018
Oh heck!
@Graytail you are my man. Christmas list for sure :)
This evenings research will involve Light Addict's thread and some bong hits so I can feel the knowledge.

Wife says I need a lab coat LOL.
probably thinking a straight jacket more likely. :peace:
On every forum I've haunted, I end up feeling like a librarian. :laugh2: It's the way my mind works. I kinda remember where I saw it last.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Scratch ethephon off the list then! Nice research Maritimer...keep up the good work. :thumb:

An amazing friend of ours whom is highly regarded in the academic world of biology has managed your's truly a membership in a scientific research community. Shed, the research library is AMAZING. Look out.

Sorry to hear about the outside grow though. At least you got something to show for it.
What a great way to look at it. :) Maybe the monster had needs also.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Heart Healthy research note;
my copy paste notes, not my work, just trying to learn. :peace:
Endocannabinoid receptors in cardiovascular system
The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the main active ingredient of Cannabis sativa (9) led to the subsequent discovery of specific receptors for THC in the human body, namely cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB-1) and type 2 (CB-2). CB-1 receptors are expressed in the liver, muscle, fat, and brain, while CB-2 receptors are expressed in large numbers in the spleen and immune cells as well as in peripheral tissues, albeit at low levels (10).These findings triggered a number of studies that eventually led to the discovery of the ECS. The ECS comprises the cannabinoid receptors (CB-1 and CB-2) as well the endogenous counterparts of THC and endogenous ligands for both cannabinoid receptors, known as N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG). The ECS has been found to be involved in a number of processes, including cell fate and proliferation and differentiation of progenitors (11). Owing to its wide representation of the ECS in the human body and its involvement in a variety of bodily processes, this system has emerged as a versatile therapeutic target. Endocannabinoids were detected in heart tissues and current evidences suggest that the ECS is involved in the regulation of heart rate (HR) and blood pressure in addition to being involved in various other pathological processes (12). Experimental studies have shown redundancy in endocannabinoid signalling and in endocannabinoid targets with dualistic role of CB-1 and CB-2 receptors in the presence of pathological conditions. Cumulative evidence seems to suggest that CB-1 and CB-2 receptors may play contributory roles in modulating cardiometabolic risk, and atherogenesis, and can also have protective roles in limiting cardiomyocyte damage (12). ECS have been found to exert vasorelaxing effects in cardiovascular system which appears to be mediated by numerous pathways. Activation of CB1 receptors in mice have been shown to produce prolonged hypotension. THC can cause vasodilatation, independent of cannabinoid receptor activation, by activating transient receptor potential ankyrin type-1 (TRPA-1) channel. In addition, anandamide activates vanilloid VR1 receptors, (a known alternative target of anandamide) present on sensory nerves triggering the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide that binds to its receptors to cause vasodilatation (13). The CB-2 receptors are expressed in cardiomyocytes, coronary endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Steffens and Pacher (14) examined the current literature on cannabinoid receptor CB-2 in cardiovascular disorders and concluded that expression of CB-2 receptors in cellular components of the cardiovascular system as well as infiltrating immune cells such as leukocytes and macrophages was possibly involved in controlling the extent of tissue inflammation and injury occurring in various cardiovascular conditions, thereby suggesting that these receptors may play a cardioprotective role. The pharmacological modulation of CB-2 receptors by CB-2 receptor agonists and antagonists therefore appears to be a promising strategy in the treatment of diseases such as stroke, atherosclerosis, restenosis, MI and heart failure.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Grow update & Straw Hat Notes;
Almost finished with the second full week of flower the cultivars are reluctantly obeying my directional guidance and tucking as we take advantage of the stretch to more fully develop the scrog. After tomorrow (flower day 14) all surgical scissors, razor blades, shears and the like are removed from the flower bed area. After two full weeks of flower my thinking is stress should be decreased to zero. Even low stress training (LST) like tucking should be scaled back in that only the most pressing of interventions be performed. Gentle Love for the next few weeks, until we start withholding fertigations. This plan changes quickly with the arrival of any gifted ABA.

We have concocted a base idea of taking a cultivar yet to be determined and amending our worm strap tea with concentrated leaf extract from a 40 year old (grandpa planted it) American Sycamore tree located in my parents front yard. :) The AS is known to produce significant quantities of ABA especially after any periods of drought.

To make the ABA leaf concentrate we will use a procedure similar to a FECO extraction. We will not be using any vaporizing device as we are not sure how well ABA would stay together, so we will evaporate slowly with a fan.
All ideas or analogies are welcome. This is an experimental thread, not a grow journal.

I need help understanding most of this stuff, so please if you know or think something, help me out and post it here. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Another thought keeps popping up in my think tank.
This might keep me from killing a whole plant with one mistake.
What if we created an entry point along a branch. Using a sharp tool we open the outer layer using a downward slice at a shallow 30 degrees for about 2 mm. Using painters tape or another means identify the site. In a few days the wound will have "knuckled" creating a potential injection target.

We are told some folks in Japan have used axillary roots in similar ventures.
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019
Does anyone have any reference pictures or drawings of an intricate dissection outlining the inside of roots and stalk ect.? I cant find much more than a rudimentary drawings. Especially grateful for anything. :peace:
How detailed do you want to get?
anat0908.jpg
anat0913.jpg


check out the plant anatomy images website by searching for Photographic Atlas of Plant Anatomy*
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
How detailed do you want to get?
anat0908.jpg
anat0913.jpg


check out the plant anatomy images website by searching for Photographic Atlas of Plant Anatomy*
Awesome @Emilya
This is exactly what kind of images I was seeking.
Photographic Atlas of Plant Anatomy is locked into bookmarks.
Many thanks :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
You could experiment but not sure how well it would work.
I couldn't help but smile. :snowboating: This whole crazy thread is an experiment. I am just a bit sorry I can't be more effective. It would feel great to think how many folks we might be helping once we figure this out. :peace:
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017
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