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Exceptionally High FECO Yields

Maritimer

Well-Known Member

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Clones were up potted today and given a splash of baby food. We normally would have waited another 4 or 5 days but an amazing teaching opportunity was fully exploited. I am mentoring a new gardener and had him perform the task under my supervision after he watched me do the first one. He lives a couple hours away and this beats talking about it on the phone.

All came out well with three rooted clones staying with us and we shipped out a pair with our apprentice. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
There are lots of products related to injecting fertilizer and systemics into trees, so you would probably just have to do something similar with a hypodermic needle and a steady hand!

Thanks for the link.
Wow, It's like you read my mind and know what I need because I had not yet thought of it.
The extrapolations we can gain from other legal ag practices is part of the tricks I deploy researching our stuff.
Of course the trickle down knowledge must slowly filter in to my head.
Never been the brightest light, but it's a light. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Some Straw-Hat Notes;

Came across some goodies looking at the link Shed sent earlier about tree injections. One door opens another room full of doors.
WIKI;
Xylem is one of the two types of transport tissue in vascular plants, phloem being the other. The basic function of xylem is to transport water from roots to stems and leaves, but it also transports nutrients.[1][2] The word "xylem" is derived from the Greek word ξύλον (xylon), meaning "wood"; the best-known xylem tissue is wood, though it is found throughout a plant.[3] The term was introduced by Carl Nägeli in 1858.

The most distinctive xylem cells are the long tracheary elements that transport water. Tracheids and vessel elements are distinguished by their shape; vessel elements are shorter, and are connected together into long tubes that are called vessels.[6]

Xylem also contains two other cell types: parenchyma and fibers.[7]

Xylem can be found:
in vascular bundles, present in non-woody plants and non-woody parts of woody plants
in secondary xylem, laid down by a meristem called the vascular cambium in woody plants
as part of a stelar arrangement not divided into bundles, as in many ferns.
In transitional stages of plants with secondary growth, the first two categories are not mutually exclusive, although usually a vascular bundle will contain primary xylem only. The branching pattern exhibited by xylem follows Murray's law.

The xylem, vessels and tracheids of the roots, stems and leaves are interconnected to form a continuous system of water-conducting channels reaching all parts of the plants. The system transports water and soluble mineral nutrients from the roots throughout the plant. It is also used to replace water lost during transpiration and photosynthesis. Xylem sap consists mainly of water and inorganic ions, although it can also contain a number of organic chemicals as well. The transport is passive, not powered by energy spent by the tracheary elements themselves, which are dead by maturity and no longer have living contents. Transporting sap upwards becomes more difficult as the height of a plant increases and upwards transport of water by xylem is considered to limit the maximum height of trees.[11] Three phenomena cause xylem sap to flow:

Pressure flow hypothesis: Sugars produced in the leaves and other green tissues are kept in the phloem system, creating a solute pressure differential versus the xylem system carrying a far lower load of solutes- water and minerals. The phloem pressure can rise to several MPa,[12] far higher than atmospheric pressure. Selective inter-connection between these systems allows this high solute concentration in the phloem to draw xylem fluid upwards by negative pressure.

Transpirational pull: Similarly, the evaporation of water from the surfaces of mesophyll cells to the atmosphere also creates a negative pressure at the top of a plant. This causes millions of minute menisci to form in the mesophyll cell wall. The resulting surface tension causes a negative pressure or tension in the xylem that pulls the water from the roots and soil.

Root pressure: If the water potential of the root cells is more negative than that of the soil, usually due to high concentrations of solute, water can move by osmosis into the root from the soil. This causes a positive pressure that forces sap up the xylem towards the leaves. In some circumstances, the sap will be forced from the leaf through a hydathode in a phenomenon known as guttation. Root pressure is highest in the morning before the stomata open and allow transpiration to begin. Different plant species can have different root pressures even in a similar environment; examples include up to 145 kPa in Vitis riparia but around zero in Celastrus orbiculatus.[13]

The primary force that creates the capillary action movement of water upwards in plants is the adhesion between the water and the surface of the xylem conduits.[14][15] Capillary action provides the force that establishes an equilibrium configuration, balancing gravity. When transpiration removes water at the top, the flow is needed to return to the equilibrium.

Transpirational pull results from the evaporation of water from the surfaces of cells in the leaves. This evaporation causes the surface of the water to recess into the pores of the cell wall. By capillary action, the water forms concave menisci inside the pores. The high surface tension of water pulls the concavity outwards, generating enough force to lift water as high as a hundred meters from ground level to a tree's highest branches.

Transpirational pull requires that the vessels transporting the water be very small in diameter; otherwise, cavitation would break the water column. And as water evaporates from leaves, more is drawn up through the plant to replace it. When the water pressure within the xylem reaches extreme levels due to low water input from the roots (if, for example, the soil is dry), then the gases come out of solution and form a bubble – an embolism forms, which will spread quickly to other adjacent cells, unless bordered pits are present (these have a plug-like structure called a torus, that seals off the opening between adjacent cells and stops the embolism from spreading).

Cohesion-tension theory

The cohesion-tension theory is a theory of intermolecular attraction that explains the process of water flow upwards (against the force of gravity) through the xylem of plants. It was proposed in 1894 by John Joly and Henry Horatio Dixon.[16][17] Despite numerous objections,[18][19] this is the most widely accepted theory for the transport of water through a plant's vascular system based on the classical research of Dixon-Joly (1894), Eugen Askenasy (1845–1903) (1895),[20][21] and Dixon (1914,1924).[22][23]

Water is a polar molecule. When two water molecules approach one another, the slightly negatively charged oxygen atom of one forms a hydrogen bond with a slightly positively charged hydrogen atom in the other. This attractive force, along with other intermolecular forces, is one of the principal factors responsible for the occurrence of surface tension in liquid water. It also allows plants to draw water from the root through the xylem to the leaf.

Water is constantly lost through transpiration from the leaf. When one water molecule is lost another is pulled along by the processes of cohesion and tension. Transpiration pull, utilizing capillary action and the inherent surface tension of water, is the primary mechanism of water movement in plants. However, it is not the only mechanism involved. Any use of water in leaves forces water to move into them.

Transpiration in leaves creates tension (differential pressure) in the cell walls of mesophyll cells. Because of this tension, water is being pulled up from the roots into the leaves, helped by cohesion (the pull between individual water molecules, due to hydrogen bonds) and adhesion (the stickiness between water molecules and the hydrophilic cell walls of plants). This mechanism of water flow works because of water potential (water flows from high to low potential), and the rules of simple diffusion.[24]

Over the past century, there has been a great deal of research regarding the mechanism of xylem sap transport; today, most plant scientists continue to agree that the cohesion-tension theory best explains this process, but multiforce theories that hypothesize several alternative mechanisms have been suggested, including longitudinal cellular and xylem osmotic pressure gradients, axial potential gradients in the vessels, and gel- and gas-bubble-supported interfacial gradients


This might take me a while to decarb all this info into stuff I need to know, and cipher ways to use the knowledge. Keeps my mind busy, even if just chasing ideas. :peace:
 

Amy Gardner

Member of the Month: March 2018 - Photo of the Month: April, Dec 2018, Apr, Sept 2019
Nice description of the phenoena that lead to guttation, Maritimer! Thanks. And thanks InTheShed for bringing it to my attention :)

I got some good pics of guttation on a Dark Devil Auto recently. Ive noticed, on cannabis and also on other plants where I’ve seen the phenomenon, that sometimes it’s very watery with no flavour, and other times it’s syrupy sweet like glucose and gooey like nectar.

Better read the whole post now... :nerd-with-glasses: :Namaste:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
The more I'm reading I wonder if we couldn't make a sav like Shed taught me how to make and add our hormonal gifts to the sav during infusion when temps are lower enough to think the ABA remains intact. Then instead of trying to inject a fluid into the stem and pushing it up the vascular system, we might simply wound the outer skin enough to penetrate into the Xylem and allow the plant to suck it up at its own rate?
Thoughts/comments welcomed as always. :peace:
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Nice description of the phenoena that lead to guttation, Maritimer! Thanks. And thanks InTheShed for bringing it to my attention :)

I got some good pics of guttation on a Dark Devil Auto recently. Ive noticed, on cannabis and also on other plants where I’ve seen the phenomenon, that sometimes it’s very watery with no flavour, and other times it’s syrupy sweet like glucose and gooey like nectar.

Better read the whole post now... :nerd-with-glasses: :Namaste:
All credits to WIKI;
@Amy Gardner, Your investigation of this guttation brings a smile to my face. :)
Please feel free to join us in this evolving thread. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
None of my notifications work for my watched threads. The only notifications I get are for my threads I started. Like I should be getting bombed with all the threads and folks I am watching, but none. Do I have a setting in privacy wrong or something? Example @stoneotter and his Strawberry cough. Every time he or someone else posts to his thread I want to know it so I can go read it. Aint this how it should work? I get nothing.
Dang :peace:

Oops. Fat fingers can be blamed deflecting attention from the fact I set it up wrong. :)
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We have began identifying and documenting target observation points on the cultivars using 1/2 inch painters tape loosely wrapped in select spots.






Someday I will get fancy and add pointers arrows to the pics. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
@Pennywise and I are both looking forward to watching the Cali Orange Flower. I took some pics of her bottom and it might be worth more than Kim K's derriere. Have a look.



 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
@InTheShed I wanted to ask if you were ever to change your pain ointment to a Maximum Strength Version per say what would be the strongest mix you would render for topical pain? I have plenty of bee wax, grape seed oil, fine olive oil. This would be for my own use.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
I'm not sure what the maximum amount of THC grapeseed oil can absorb is, though @Oldbear might have data on that. What I can tell you is that I aim for at least 15mg/ml of oil which I'm sure is nowhere near the limit.

Skip the wax and the olive oil though. Wax just prevents absorption and olive oil hardly gets absorbed at all!
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Okay so now the girls are all fixed up with a bunch of chunks of tape. Each piece of tape will have a number marked on it beginning with 1 and followed on the next piece of tape with a 2 and so on. After all the pieces of tape have been identified on all the affected cultivars, we will document what pieces of tape are on what cultivar. Additionally each piece of tape will lead to documentation of primary or secondary branchial sites. It is my thinking the larger primary branches provide the largest buds, but wish to have a look at how many bigguns I can pop from secondary structures. Not sure it matters. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Gardeners notes;
With our NL cultivar we are confident the flowering time will be closer to 50 days (compared to 56) with this seed stock being provided by our regular NL seed breeder of whose strain we are very familiar. This being said we are planning to bump up the timing of drought application by a few days. Normally I begin with Flower day #42 being the first day without H2O. We now plan to apply drought beginning on flower day #39. This 3 day jump will be tried on one of the two Cali Orange plants as well. The remaining Cali and the GSC will begin drought on flower day #42. Caplan experimented with the timing and got mixed results settling on the beginning of the seventh week (day #42). I might be a better gardener than the good doctor. Just sayin... :peace:

clone note; they will be playing with us and some abscisic acid in a few weeks :)
 
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