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Exceptionally High FECO Yields

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
copy paste notes from tonight's straw hat reading.
HORMONAL REGULATION O F DEVELOPMENTAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PROCESSES ... many—perhaps all—growth phenomena are the result of interaction and balance between several hormones,... (Kenneth Thimann, 1977, p . 203) All plant hormones have multiple roles i n plant growth o r defense, i.e. , they ar e pleiotropic in their effects. T o thi s basic theme, a layer o f complexity i s added b y th e fact that two o r more hormones bring about th e same, o r similar, responses. Fo r example, cell division i s mediated b y cytokinins (CKs), auxins, o r gibberellins (GAs). Cell enlargement involves action b y auxin, GA, brassinosteroids (BRs), o r ethylene. Abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, an d jasmonates (JAs) ar e involved i n th e ability o f a plant to cope with biotic o r abiotic stresses. This redundancy i s a hallmark o f plant development, although i t i s no t clear whether i t i s real o r only apparent, i.e., tw o hormones regulate closely related bu t different aspects o f th e same process. Plant hormones also regulate some activities that ar e specific t o each hormone. Fo r instance, patterning i n embryo development an d polar phenomena such a s apical dominance, vascular differentiation, an d tropic growth under th e influence o f light o r gravity are principally regulated b y th e endogenous auxin, indoleacetic acid o r lAA; mobilization of seed food reserves i n cereal grains i s specific t o GAs; see d dormancy i s induced by ABA; fruit ripening i s associated with ethylene; an d JAs ar e uniquely involved in th e deposition o f vegetative storage proteins. The chapters i n Section II I o f this book reflect th e apparent redundancy and uniqueness of hormone action. They also show that even relatively simple processes. Plant hormones also regulate some activities that ar e specific t o each hormone. Fo r instance, patterning i n embryo development an d polar phenomena such a s apical dominance, vascular differentiation, an d tropic growth under th e influence o f light o r gravity are principally regulated b y th e endogenous auxin, indoleacetic acid o r lAA; mobilization of seed food reserves i n cereal grains i s specific t o GAs; see d dormancy i s induced by ABA; fruit ripening i s associated with ethylene; an d JAs ar e uniquely involved in th e deposition o f vegetative storage proteins.

The chapters i n Section II I o f this book reflect th e apparent redundancy and uniqueness of hormone action. They also show that even relatively simple processes. such as apical dominance o r production o f lateral roots, involve a n interaction o f tw o o r more hormones an d their relative levels, which ar e affected b y environmental and/or developmental cues. Such interaction i s often antagonistic, as , fo r example, lA A and C K interaction in lateral root formation, although i t i s no t clear whether such antagonism i s used for regulation o f th e process i n nature. Synergistic interaction also occurs, e.g., fo r ethylene and J A i n induction o f some genes i n plant defense against pathogens. Finally, several hormones may ac t i n concert, on e after another, t o regulate a sequence o f developmental events. Fo r example, fruit se t may b e regulated b y lAA, fruit growth by GA, fruit ripening b y ethylene, an d seed maturation an d dormancy b y ABA. Because of these interactions among homones and between hormones and environmental factors, the extent o f which we have only recently begun t o appreciate, a n understanding of plant hormonal response i s a complex and difficult fabric t o unentangle.

In the past, plant hormones have been credited with a bewildering array o f responses—there is hardly any plant process that ha s no t been attributed t o one o r another hormone. Such conclusions were often drawn from treatment o f whole plant o r isolated organs/tissues with exogenous hormones, often a t unnaturally high concentrations. These treatments disturb th e natural homeostasis and generally d o not provide a true indication o f th e role o f a hormone. That rol e i s deciphered better by the us e o f mutants that ar e deficient i n o r ar e insensitive t o a specific hormone o r b y a defined biochemical response t o a hormone. Fo r thi s reason, no t al l responses attributed to hormones ar e covered i n these chapters; rather th e chapters ar e selective i n that they deal with only th e better understood and, hopefully, major responses an d processes.

Fruit an d seed development and seed germination, covered i n Chapters 17, IS, and 19 , ar e growth-related processes in which CKs, lAA, an d GAs play important although still little understood roles, whereas fruit ripening an d seed maturation and dormancy ar e culminating phases o f growth, akin t o senescence, an d ar e regulated b y ethylene, ABA, an d possibly J As.
Thimann, K. V . (1997). "Hormone Action i n th e Whole Life o f Plants." Th e University o f Massachusetts Press, Amherst.

Wow,
I would like a copy of this book down in the office. Wonder if my Land of Lincoln library card can summon a borrowed copy? :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We got some of this coming Oct 18th. $25 on e-bay
methyl jasmonate
To study the role of methyl jasmonate in mango fruit ripening and
biosynthesis of aroma volatiles, one lot of green mature preclimacteric ‘Kensington Pride’ mangoes was ripened under ambient conditions (21 ± 1°C). The changes in endogenous levels of methyl jasmonate in the pulp during ripening were investigated. Another lot of green mature preclimacteric fruit was treated with methyl jasmonate vapour at different concentrations (0, 10–3M, 10–4M and 10–5M) for 12 h to study the role of methyl jasmonate on biosynthesis of aroma volatile compounds in the fruit. Following methyl jasmonate treatments, the fruit were then allowed to ripen under ambient conditions (21 ± 1°C). Only trans-methyl jasmonate was identified from the pulp of ‘Kensington Pride’ mango. Concentration of trans-methyl jasmonate in the pulp was higher at harvest day (123.67 ng g–1) and decreased as the ripening progressed at the ripe stage (0.14 ng g–1). Methyl jasmonate treatments increased ethylene production at the climacteric stage and was more pronounced at a higher concentration (10–3M) of applied methyl jasmonate. Skin colour of ripe fruit was significantly improved with exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (10–3M). Methyl jasmonate treatments also increased the concentration of fatty acids as well as total aroma volatiles, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, aromatics, norisoprenoid, alcohols and esters in the pulp of fruit. However, exogenous application of methyl jasmonate tended to reduce production of n-tetradecane, especially on day 5 and 7 of ripening. In general, exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (10–3M) significantly promoted biosynthesis of ethylene, fatty acids and ripening and aroma volatile compounds during fruit ripening. Our experimental results suggest that methyl jasmonte is involved in early steps in the modulation of mango fruit ripening.

methyl jasmonate
Professor Pete told me about. :) He thinks I should tinker with this stuff verses ABA in our efforts to trigger enhanced glandular production thru hormonal stimulation. The vendor alludes to a 99% increase in trichome production. I am more excited about this prospect the more I learn reading.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Salicylic acid (SA) is a simple phenolic compound synthesized in a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, including plants. Leaf and bark of willow tree (Salix sp.) contain large amounts of SA, which was widely used as a medication for pain relief in the ancient world. In 1828, German scientist Johann A. Buchner purified salicyl alcohol glucoside (an SA derivative called salicin) from willow bark. Ten years later, an Italian chemist Raffaele Piria working in Paris converted salicin into an acidic aromatic compound that he named salicylic acid. In 1859 Hermann Kolbe et al. chemically synthesized SA, but the bitter taste and side effects limited the long-term use of SA as a medication. In 1897 Felix Hoffmann working in the Bayer pharmaceutical company synthesized acetyl salicylic acid (originally produced by a French chemist, Charles Frederic Gerhardt, in 1853), which became known as Aspirin, to reduce the side effects (Weissmann, 1991). Now Aspirin is widely used to treat pain, fever, inflammation, heart attacks, strokes, and blood clot formation

Both salicylic acid and GABA induced THCAS gene expression.
•There was a significant correlation between THCAS gene expression and THC content.
•The higher amount of THC coincided with the lower amount of CBD.
•Salicylic acid and GABA can be used as elicitor compounds to massively produce THC and CBD.
•Standard protocol based on spraying on plants to elicit specific metabolites which are mainly produced at flowering time and in flowering organs has many benefits alongside other elicitation approaches.

:peace:

This project was conducted with the aim of increasing valuable secondary metabolites such as D-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) identified in cannabis plants. Whole plants were treated with salicylic acid (SA) and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) to evaluate their effect on THCAS, CBDAS, OLS, and PT genes which are responsible for production of the main cannabinoids. THC and CBD contents in related samples were measured using HPLC, 72 h after treatments. THCAS expression was enhanced and reached its maximum level with 1 mM salicylic acid; however, the expression of CBDAS, OLS, and PT decreased. Furthermore, treatment with GABA enhanced the THCAS expression mainly at 0.1 mM. The highest THC content was obtained in 1 mM salicylic acid and 0.1 mM GABA treatments, respectively. The results suggested that salicylic acid and GABA can control the signaling cascades of genes in cannabinoid pathway by changing their expression patterns at critical concentration, and these two compounds can be considered as effective elicitors for commercial cannabinoid production. Designing an appropriate standard protocol based on spraying approach on plants to elicit specific metabolites such as THC and CBD which are mainly produced at flowering time and in flowering organs has many benefits alongside other elicitation approaches.

Cannabis sativa L. (C. sativa) is an annual dioecious plant, which shares its origins with the inception of the first agricultural human societies in Asia. Over the course of time different parts of the plant have been utilized for therapeutic and recreational purposes, for instance, extraction of healing oils from seed, or the use of inflorescences for their psychoactive effects. The key psychoactive constituent in C. sativa is called Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (D9-THC). The endocannabinoid system seems to be phylogenetically ancient, as it was present in the most primitive vertebrates with a neuronal network. N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are the main endocannabinoids ligands present in the animal kingdom, and the main endocannabinoid receptors are cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptor and cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor.

Night Folks
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Welcome to 420 @survivorx2
Your a grower now :)
I look forward to watching you raise Thelma and Louise in their new home.
Feel free to start a grow journal.
It will help you remember stuff.
Im not the best at using this site but we can muddle thru.

Later bro
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
I have been told that salicylic acid (in the form of plain aspirin) can enhance the health of the plant when used as either foliar or root feeding. The possibility that it increases THCa production would send me to the drug store, though I have no idea where to buy GABA!
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
I have been told that salicylic acid (in the form of plain aspirin) can enhance the health of the plant when used as either foliar or root feeding. The possibility that it increases THCa production would send me to the drug store, though I have no idea where to buy GABA!
Have a look at Xyten out of New Zealand. They have an almost GABA. They might be real hobbits. :peace:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
I have been told that salicylic acid (in the form of plain aspirin) can enhance the health of the plant when used as either foliar or root feeding. The possibility that it increases THCa production would send me to the drug store, though I have no idea where to buy GABA!
Growing up Dad would always put crushed up aspirin in with the Christmas tree water. WTG Pops. :)
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
So we will be soaking brown rice in the future, I’m thinking. :)
The accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (Gaba), a well-known blood pressure-lowering compound, in the rice germ during water soaking was investigated by using ten different cultivars. The amount and pattern of the Gaba accumulation varied considerably depending on the cultivar. Hokkai 269 exhibited a remarkable accumulation of Gaba in the germ and is thus suggested to be a very promising source for Gaba.
“Considering the large Gaba accumulation with a very simple treatment of water soaking, the germ of rice, especially that of Hokkai 269, could be a good material. In the germ of Hokkai 269, simultaneous increases in glutamate and Gaba were observed between the l·h and 4·h incubations, which reflects the proteolytic activity exceeding the glutamate decarboxylase activity. The small increase in Gaba content in the germ during storage suggests that glutamate decarboxylase had little activity in the germ of brown rice with a moisture content of 15% (w/w). “

All this neat stuff to investigate, and help from all kinds of folks. This is awesome, win or lose. :peace:
Maybe we amend our medium for a test clone adding Hokkai 269 to the medium when I mid-pot.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Willow Extract :thumb:
We have selected the ideal donor Willow and plan taking both bark/stems and leaves. The willow sits along the edge of a wooded area at the estuary of a creek feeding the river. A very hobbitual setting for old tree-beards cousin. Having a look over some other experiment’s extraction recipes and methods. Very helpful. :peace:
So we will collect Sycamore leaves, willow leaves, and Japanese brown rice in 3 separate concoctions. You cannot beat the price if any of this works. I have always enjoyed making tea for the cultivars anyway.

Samples Preparation
The willow leaves (Salix safsaf L.) were collected from the Salix farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt. On the day of harvest the young leaves (newly emerged) were extracted in hot water (at 10% w/v). About 10 g of fresh leaves were boiled (at 100°C) in 100 ml distilled water for 20 min, then filtered through a sterilized Miracloth and centrifuged at 15,000 g for 15 min. The Salicin concentration was about 750 ng/ml. The organic solvent extraction was carried out with the plant leaves as follows; 80 g leaves were extracted consecutively at room temperature with petroleum ether (at 40–60°C), that was followed by diethyl ether, chloroform, acetone, and finally with 70% (v/v) ethanol. The solvent of each extract was removed by distillation at a low temperature.to

Last minute edit;
Headed to the woods, with all we are reading we will be taking cuttings (clones) to raise here at the house in addition to our scavenger chores. :)
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We altered normal fertigation protocols whipping up some Love Tea for the girls post sexing party.
Two days later they are still smiling tip to tip. :)
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019
Stone
How long did you veg the clones? The pics look pretty much like what happens when I go six weeks before flipping lights. I call first two weeks pre-veg. Then I bump the wattage, up-pot, begin fertigations and go four weeks. Monster root balls develop allowing for rapid vegetative growth. When the lights flip the plants are fully lollipopped during the first week of stretch a bit at a time. I top trim only to a sweet 16 pattern just like I was taught in Humboldt. Too many trims can lead to bunches of small buds. Im sure you already know this stuff. Im just enjoying putting the old straw hat on again.

My FS LED plants often look pale green like that late in flower. Nutes are amended to increase N about 15% over normal concentrations. Usually helps a bunch.

Great to be back :peace:
She's 157 veg days and now 65 in flower. I had her in the background waiting for a spot in the tent. Then since she was alone I figured why not go for a whole tent one plant grow to make some bud. I ended up topping and she has 11 total branches and numerous shoots coming from them on top.
Nice to see you back!
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
You're sad because you don't have a centrifuge farm nearby? LOL!

Are any of the lab-based parts of the experiments necessary or do they just make the teas more effective?
I get sad when I see all the tools I cannot afford to operate. If the VA or some big money player wants us to build a lab we can be happy and make cannabis do tricks. :peace:
 
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