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Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We are looking over some scheduling issues with the garden. At present we are engaged in three separate grows.
First we have four cultivars in their fourth week of flower.
Second we have two rooted clones of Cali Orange in their first week of hard vegetation.
Third is our 4 (possibly only 3) cuttings of Ocean Grown Girl Scout Cookies in first week of pre-veg.
Our lighting available outside the clone closet is 1 600W HID over 2 main scrogs, and one 315W FS LED ready.
Different studies are in work for all three crops.
Planning is key. Need bong hits, I'm thinking. :51:
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We looked over the garden calendar and believe we can flow everything into our setup with a few adjustments. Worse case scenario involves the monster clones might not be under scrog when they move into the flowerbed.

If the e-mails I received are correct, we should get our MEJA sometime tomorrow. Feel excited like a young child waiting for Christmas.
 

Skybound

Well-Known Member
We looked over the garden calendar and believe we can flow everything into our setup with a few adjustments. Worse case scenario involves the monster clones might not be under scrog when they move into the flowerbed.

If the e-mails I received are correct, we should get our MEJA sometime tomorrow. Feel excited like a young child waiting for Christmas.
When you ordered, was it specified how much you're buying? It seemed the way it was listed on their site was confusing to me. I'm also curious if it will come with any application instructions, like how many times it's to be applied and when.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
When you ordered, was it specified how much you're buying? It seemed the way it was listed on their site was confusing to me. I'm also curious if it will come with any application instructions, like how many times it's to be applied and when.
I am embarrassed a bit to say you know as much as I do. I will provide complete transparency of the transaction. Good or bad. First time I waited for seeds to come across the pond the wife was sure I had been taken. The finest cannabis strain I have ever grown finally came. Critical Jack from Dinafem in Spain.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
We have decided on our New Year Crop. A wintertime favorite. We will waterboard 5 Northern Lights Fems while taking down the Christmas decorations. Took this pic of our current Northern Queen. Awesome in my opinion. :)
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Getting my MOJO up and excited about our MEJA. Straw Hat copy & paste notes on the jazz.

MEJA

Foliar MeJA application 4 days prior to harvest of broccoli at commercial maturity resulted in enhanced total GS concentrations. Although a single application of 250 µmol L−1 MeJA maximized GS concentrations in broccoli florets, two days of consecutive treatments (4 and 3 days prior to harvest) of 250 µmol L−1 MeJA further enhanced neoglucobrassicin concentrations and floret extract quinone reductase (QR)‐inducing activity. With increasing concentrations of MeJA in spray applications to broccoli florets, concentrations of the glucosinolates glucoraphanin, gluconasturtiin and neoglucobrassicin and the isothiocyanate sulforaphane as well as anticancer and anti‐inflammatory bioactivities as measured by QR induction and inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production respectively were significantly increased. Concentrations of these phytochemicals showed strong positive correlations with QR‐inducing and NO‐inhibitory activities.

Exogenous jasmonate application has also been shown to reduce chilling injury (Gonzalez-Aguilar et al., 2003) and enhance accumulation of several classes of secondary compounds (as reviewed by Memelink et al., 2001).

Jasmonates [Methyl jasmonate+ jasmonic acid] are crucial cellular regulators that are involved in several plant developmental processes, including seed germination, callus growth, primary root growth, flowering, gum and bulb formation, and senescence [41, 42,]. Jasmonates stimulate plant defense responses to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses [43]. In addition, the exogenous application of MeJA in A. thaliana confers basal thermo-tolerance and protection against heat shock [44]. Triazoles (Tr), as plant growth regulators, protect plants from several abiotic stresses, e.g., thermal stress and water-deficient stress [45]. The mechanism underlying the role of triazoles in stress protection involves hormonal changes, including cytokinin augmentation, increased ABA and reduced ethylene [46, 47].

Different combinations of plant growth regulators were exogenously applied three times at 30, 35, and 40 days after emergence (DAE) to enable thorough coverage prior to imposing heat stress. The different PGR treatments were (1) vitamin C + vitamin E + methyl jasmonates + brassinosteroids (Vc+Ve+MeJA+Br), (2) brassinosteroids + triazoles + methyl jasmonates (Br+Tr+MeJA), (3) vitamin C + vitamin E (Vc+Ve), (4) methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and (5) nothing applied control (NAC). Vc, Ve, MeJA, Br and Tr were applied at rates of 1.4, 6.9, 1.8, 4.0 and 0.55 ppm solution, accordingly in the respective treatments. Vc was dissolved in de-ionized water, and Ve was dissolved in a small amount of ethyl alcohol; de-ionized water was further added to bring the solution to the desired volume.

The experiment included 7 treatments from some bio-stimulants as follows: Three different concentrations of yeast extract (2, 3 and 4 g.L-1 ), chitosan extract (2, 4, 6 ml.L-1 ) and control were applied at 30, 45, 60 and 75 days from sowing date in both seasons. Tap water was sprayed to the control of plants. The experiment was designed in a complete randomized blocks (CRB) with three replicates.

Methyl jasmonate application enhanced the amount of ascorbic acid in Arabidopsis and tobacco suspension cells (Wolucka et al., 2005)

Recently, it was reported that JAs also play a role in physiological response of secretion of floral nectar (Figure 2). Radhika et al. (2010a) demonstrated that floral nectar secretion is controlled by JAs in Brassica species. Interestingly, a significant production of floral nectar was observed in the flowers of B. napus, when JA is exogenously sprayed to them.

There are some reports on positive effects of biostimulants application on medicinal plants.In growing the medicinal plants, it is vital to associate the biomass production to quality of the raw material. The application of biostimulants in the commercial production of medicinal plants is a viable management practice for the production of these species, increasing biomass production and enhancing secondary metabolites synthesis. Studies about the effect of plant biostimulants on the accumulation of secondary metabolites in medicinal plants have been conducted in order to increase the medicinal and trade values of these species [68]. The development of biostimulants may follow a classical ‘pharmacological’ approach, where candidate active substances or microorganisms are screened in controlled conditions and a stepwise procedure is followed for selecting promising candidates, moving from the laboratory to more realistic conditions.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member
MEJA got slowed in customs out @InTheShed 's way. Surprised it came in west coast vs. east. Anyhow shipping will probably be next week. A 420 member dropped in my other thread and noticed my monster clones were not under moisture barriers. Wow, my bad. Like I forget my head if not for the mirror. Fixed the little pup tents right on the spot. Many thanks again to @AdaminCO for the gentle observation. :)

Cali Orange clones got first taste of the good life today with a saturation feed. Two hours later they are singing and dancing down catching HPS rays with mom. The OG Girl Scout Cookies Monster Clones are the tent's beneficiary back in the clone closet.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Our friend @stoneotter will love reading this abstract I came across. He has a new FS LED in his garden. :)

Growth conditions are expected to alter the relative and absolute content of the hundreds of phytochemicals produced by Cannabis sativa L.; some of these possess biological activity on the human body. However, relatively little information exists regarding the effects of different light regimes on the composition of C. sativa secondary metabolites and thus on their biological activity. In this study, we investigated how light quality influences the production and final content of secondary metabolites, as well as their bioactive properties. Toward these, plant growth and blooming were carried out at different illumination conditions, utilizing light-emitting diode (LED) fixtures vs. conventional fluorescent and high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps as controls. Inflorescences were sampled at different time points along the blooming; extract compositions were analyzed by HPLC and GC/MS, and the biological activity of the extracted material was assessed using cell viability assays. We found that growth and blooming under LED illumination considerably changed shoot architecture and inflorescence mass. Moreover, the content of cannabinoids, terpenes, and alkanes were altered in the inflorescences of LED-grown plants during the flowering period as well as in the harvested flowers. In particular, significantly higher quantities of cannabigerolic acid accumulated in the inflorescences that flowered under LED fixtures, with a cannabigerolic acid to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (CBGA:THCA) ratio of 1:2 as opposed to 1:16 when grown under HPS. Notably, the cytotoxic activities of extracts derived from plants grown under the different illumination regimes were different, with extracts from LED-grown plants possessing higher cytotoxicity along the flowering stage. Our results thus indicate that the transition to indoor growth of C. sativa under LED lighting, which can have significant impacts on cannabinoid and terpene content, and also on the bioactive properties of the plant extracts, should proceed with thorough consideration.

Full Spectrum LED Abstract via SD
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
I put up the abstract above about LED for Stone, but got to thinking all our previous studies have all been under HPS illumination. My crowded playing field has us putting the Cali Orange clones under the 300 LED when they are ready for flower-bedding. This may impact my ability to attempt and gauge planned studies. The clone closet has two 26W FSLED that all my cultivars are initially exposed, but then the main grows always get put under the larger footprint HPS600. And that is where we have enough room for control plants. Under my 300 LED it will be a struggle with two cultivars as each of them would grow big enough to use the whole canopy an 300w FS LED provides.

We will find ways to tinker. I know! :51:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
More MEJA MOJO Study study :51:

Jasmonic acid (JA) is regarded as endogenous regulator that plays important roles in regulating stress responses, plant growth, and development. Salicylic acid (SA) has been identified as an important signaling element involved in establishing the local and systemic disease resistance response of plants after pathogen attack. A field experiment was conducted to assess the foliar applications effect of JA and SA on quantity and quality yields of essential oil of lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.). Experimental treatments were: I) water foliar application; II) water + 1% ethanol foliar application (as a solvent); III-V) JA at 0.05–0.40 mg L−1; VI-IX) SA at 0.14–14.00 g L−1. notice micro-dosing

n the present research the effect of preharvest metyil jasmonate (MeJA) treatment on the ripening process and fruit quality parameters at harvest was evaluated, for the first time, in two table grape cultivars, ‘Magenta’ and ‘Crimson’, during two years, 2016 and 2017. MeJA treatments (applied when berry volume was ca. 40% of its final one, at veraison and 3 days before the first harvest date) affected grape ripening process and vine yield differently depending on applied concentration. Thus, MeJA at 5 and 10 mM delayed berry ripening and decreased berry weight and volume as well as vine yield, in a dose-dependent way, in both cultivars, although the effect on ‘Crimson’ was more dramatic than in ‘Magenta’. However, treatments with MeJA at 1, 0.1 and 0.01 mM accelerated ripening and increased total phenolics and individual anthocyanin concentrations, the major effects being obtained with 0.1 mM concentration. In addition, total soluble solids (TSS) and firmness levels were also increased by these MeJA treatments. These results might have a great agronomic and commercial importance since fruit with higher size and harvested earlier would reach higher prizes at markets and berries with higher firmness and TSS would be more appreciated by consumers. Moreover, MeJA treatments increased the content of antioxidant compounds, such as phenolics and individual anthocyanins, leading to enhance the homogeneous pigmentation of the whole cluster, with additional effects on increasing the health beneficial effects of grape consumption. Another case of less does more? And the timing of foliar treatments.

Two plum (Prunus salicina Lindl.) cultivars ‘Black Splendor’ (BS) and ‘Royal Rosa’ (RR) were treated with methyl jasmonate (MeJA) at 3 concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mM) along the on-tree fruit development: 63, 77 and 98 days after full blossom (DAFB). On a weekly basis, fruit samples were taken for measuring fruit size and weight and parameters related to quality. Results revealed that MeJA was effective in increasing fruit size and weight, the 0.5 mM being the most effective for BS cultivar and 2.0 mM for RR. At harvest, those fruit treated with 0.5 mM MeJA had the highest firmness and colour Hue values. notice different strains different results

Glutathione is a tripeptide involved in diverse aspects of plant metabolism. We investigated how the reduced form of glutathione, GSH, applied site-specifically to plants, affects zinc (Zn) distribution and behavior in oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus) cultured hydroponically. Foliar-applied GSH significantly increased the Zn content in shoots and the root-to-shoot Zn translocation ratio; furthermore, this treatment raised the Zn concentration in the cytosol of root cells and substantially enhanced Zn xylem loading. Notably, microarray analysis revealed that the gene encoding pectin methylesterase was upregulated in roots following foliar GSH treatment. We conclude that certain physiological signals triggered in response to foliar-applied GSH were transported via sieve tubes and functioned in root cells, which, in turn, increased Zn availability in roots by releasing Zn from their cell wall. Consequently, root-to-shoot translocation of Zn was activated and Zn accumulation in the shoot was markedly increased. Can foliar spray encourage other root to shoot translocation?

Long-distance water transport in plants relies on negative pressures established in continuous water columns in xylem conduits. Water under tension is in a metastable state and is prone to cavitation and embolism, which leads to loss of hydraulic conductance, reduced productivity and eventually plant death. Experimental evidence suggests that plants can repair embolized xylem by pushing water from living vessel-associated cells into the gas-filled conduit lumina. Most surprisingly, embolism refilling is known to occur even when the bulk of still functioning xylem is under tension, a finding that is in seemingly contradiction to basic principles of thermodynamics. This review summarizes our current understanding of xylem refilling processes and speculates that embolism repair under tension can be envisioned as a particular case of phloem unloading, as suggested by several events and components of embolism repair, typically involved in phloem unloading mechanisms. Far from being a challenge to irreversible thermodynamics, embolism refilling is emerging as a finely regulated vital process essential for plant functioning under different environmental stresses.

Transport of atrazine (ATR), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB) from roots to shoots via xylem of wheat and tomato seedlings was measured following a 24-h exposure of plant roots to hydroponic solutions of these organic compounds. Transport of the compounds from roots to shoots reached equilibrium within 24 h, consistent with an earlier finding. Low concentrations of TCB were detected in the final external solution and the xylem efflux of control wheat seedlings. This suggested that there was a fast foliar uptake of TCB and its downward movement via phloem of the wheat seedlings. Concentrations of DNT, ATR, and TCB in xylem effluxes of wheat and tomato increased significantly with increases of their external concentrations. Stuff goes up fast.

The xylem is one of the two long distance transport tissues in plants, providing a low resistance pathway for water movement from roots to leaves. Its properties determine how much water can be transported and transpired and, at the same time, the plant's vulnerability to transport dysfunctions (the formation and propagation of emboli) associated to important stress factors, such as droughts and frost. Both maximum transport efficiency and safety against embolism have classically been attributed to the properties of individual conduits or of the pit membrane connecting them. But this approach overlooks the fact that the conduits of the xylem constitute a network. The topology of this network is likely to affect its overall transport properties, as well as the propagation of embolism through the xylem, since, according to the air-seeding hypothesis, drought-induced embolism propagates as a contact process (i.e., between neighbouring conduits). Here we present a model of the xylem that takes into account its system-level properties, including the connectivity of the xylem network. With the tools of graph theory and assuming steady state and Darcy's flow we calculated the hydraulic conductivity of idealized wood segments at different water potentials. A Monte Carlo approach was adopted, varying the anatomical and topological properties of the segments within biologically reasonable ranges, based on data available from the literature. Our results showed that maximum hydraulic conductivity and vulnerability to embolism increase with the connectivity of the xylem network. This can be explained by the fact that connectivity determines the fraction of all the potential paths or conduits actually available for water transport and spread of embolism. It is concluded that the xylem can no longer be interpreted as the mere sum of its conduits, because the spatial arrangement of those conduits in the xylem network influences the main functional properties of this tissue. This brings new arguments into the long-standing discussion on the efficiency vs. safety trade-off in the plants’ xylem.
 
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Maritimer

Well-Known Member

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Off topic sort of,
Tonight the wife's church is hosting a charitable event in our behalf. An 3 hour event intended to raise cash for me and my wife as she is temporarily disabled, and of course yours truly is a broken machine.
I am embarrassed, grateful, and now totally understand the saying "It is better to give than receive".
And I cannot offer the good folks anything in return without the wife's ire.
No Bong Hits,
just thank you. :)
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Hello @Pennywise ,
If you get a chance would you have a look at my nutrition basics. I think my nutes could be improved with some investigation by a more knowledgeable gardener. :)

Looking a little closer at what I feed my cultivars. I think there is room for improvements.
Base veg 20-20-20 X 3 grams + 1 TBSP 5-1-1 Fish Emulsion or 10 grams 1-0-0 Organic worm casings/gal.
Flower base 10-30-20 X 3 grams + 1 TBSP 5-1-1 Fish Emulsion or 10 grams 1-0-0 Organic worm casings/gal.
FS LED Illuminated cultivars get 1 tsp extra Fish Emulsion because of increased N demand.
All water is ro filtered.
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017
@Skybound what do you think?
Skybound would be better to answer questions on what you’re feeding. My nutes are much simpler to use.
 
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