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Exceptionally High FECO Yields

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Skybound

Well-Known Member
Ahoy @InTheShed
I now understand fully when @Pennywise told me that @Skybound has some knowledge of nutes.
Guys, I have visited all three of your sites and I want to say thanks.
As a grower I am a Chihuahua rolling with some German Shepard's.
Wondering if MeJA might help me. LOL

You guys are like master growers. Your patience with me has been amazing.
At the end of it all, we're all in varying stages of feeling around in the dark. Sure at times we hear voices in the dark that tell us what they did and how it worked out, but it's on us to weigh the information against other information we've collected and choose to follow all or part of the suggested steps.
 

Graytail

Plant of the Year: 2014 - Plant of the Month: Dec 2014 - Nug of the Month: Feb 2015, Mar & Aug 2016, Dec 2017, Aug 2018, Jan 2019 - Nug of the Year: 2017 - Photo of the Month: June 2018
LOL, and the suggested steps are endlessly varied.

"Cultivation" is the key word. If you're going to take care of a living thing, you have to choose what will work for your own self. 5 months is a long time with a lot of days in it. :laugh2:
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Gardeners notes;

Tomorrow will be the first day of the 7th week of flower. The Northern Lights cultivar will begin a planned drought intended to run the next 8 to 11 days. Turgid values of LWA have been documented and are in line with expectations of LWA for this strain.

The Girl Scout Cookie cultivar will continue to be fertigated normally for flower.

The Cali Orange cultivar #1 was fertigated today, additionally a light foliar spray of fish fertilizer and blackstrap molasses was applied. The flowering is near end with few white pistils remaining on the smaller than average buds.

The Cali Orange cultivar #2 was treated on Halloween (Thursday) flower day #40 with a foliar spray of MeJA @ ~100 ppm. and was fertigated today. This Wednesday will be flower day #45 and a second application of the elicitor is planned.

The Cali Orange Clones 1 & 2 are enjoying life under the LED. We have our nutes dialed up about 15% higher than normal to accommodate the faster growing plants under FS LED.

The Girl Scout Cookie Monster Clones are split with two specimens doing well and two doing not so well. One plant I dropped about 2 inches and she is still recovering. Another miserable plant would be FC #4 the perpetual slow poke of the group. We will probably only take two best plants to full flower anyways.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
copy
Plant architecture is defined as the three-dimensional organization of the plant. For the aerial part, this includes plant height, branching/tillering pattern, foliar arrangement and morphology, and reproductive organ structure. Plant architecture is a trait of major agronomic importance as it has a strong effect on harvest index and grain yield potential (Reinhardt and Kuhlemeier, 2002). In the field, crops are generally grown at high planting density and with high nitrogen input, two factors that promote stem elongation and lodging. To ensure high yield and avoid lodging under these conditions, cereal crops with semidwarf and/or erect leaf phenotypes are highly desired (Van Camp, 2005). Semidwarf varieties of rice (Oryza sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) with enhanced yield and resistance to lodging are at the basis of the green revolution (Athwal, 1971). Green biomass is another important trait, especially in energy crops (Xie and Peng, 2011).

BR-deficient and BR-insensitive mutants of Arabidopsis are generally dwarfed with shorter petioles and hypocotyls. By contrast, BR catabolic mutants and transgenic plants overexpressing the BR biosynthetic genes or positive regulators of BR signaling generally display increased growth and elongated organ phenotypes, including larger rosettes/taller plants with elongated leaves and longer petioles (Figure 1; see Supplemental Table 1 online). BR-deficient and BR-signaling mutants of other dicotyledonous (dicot) plant species, such as pea (Pisum sativum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum; formerly Lycopersicon esculentum) mutants of the BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) gene encoding the BR receptor, also present a dwarf phenotype (Bishop and Koncz, 2002) (Figure 1; see Supplemental Table 2 online). Similar phenotypes are observed in monocotyledonous (monocot) species. The shortened hypocotyl and leaf petiole of BR-deficient or BR-insensitive Arabidopsis mutants are mirrored in the respective rice mutants by shortened internodes and more erect leaves due to a reduced lamina joint inclination (e.g., Arabidopsis bri1 compared with O. sativa bri1 [Osbri1/d61] mutants) (Bishop and Koncz, 2002; Nakamura et al., 2006). Conversely, the elongated organ phenotype of BR mutant/transgenic plants in Arabidopsis translates in mutant/transgenic rice plants with increased leaf bending (e.g., the dominant Arabidopsis suppressor of phyb-4 7 [sob7]-D versus the rice bending lamina2 [bla2] mutant phenotype) (Turk et al., 2005; Park et al., 2006). Leaf angle is an important trait in cereal crops because it allows higher density planting and therefore can have a major impact on biomass and grain yield per hectare (Sakamoto et al., 2006). The molecular and cellular mechanisms by which BRs regulate lamina joint inclination remain unclear. Reduced leaf angle in the rice BR-deficient and BR-insensitive mutants is caused by an elongation failure in the abaxial lamina joint cells. This feature has been used as a marker in screens for BR-related mutants with mild phenotypes (Hong et al., 2004). Differential expression of one or several component(s) of the BR pathways may explain why some tissues are more sensitive than others to changes in BR levels and responses.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Well I tried shooting a video complete with yours truly explaining my madness while going over the studies and the plants we are growing. I had even rehearsed my lines, sort of.
Not gonna happen folks.
I give botany a bad face and an even scarier voice.
I really wanted to show you guys the MeJA effects on Cali #2.
After 72 plus hours a simple glance at the scrog and you can see her standing out.
Searching for the right way to describe what I see and feel.
I cannot say for sure about trichome production yet but one thing is clear,
the foliar spray has the plants attention. The LWA of a normal, happy plant is being sharply reduced.
The plant is standing at attention. Like in stretch, but different.
Im going back downstairs until I can figure out how to photograph and describe what I see.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Maritimer

Well-Known Member

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
I don't see any amber but she's getting close.
Thanks Pennywise
If I can harvest her in a few more days I have time to reload her place in the scrog with one of the Cali clones. I need to get one of the clones out of the LED scrog because one plant fills the 300 W LED footprint. Two would be overcrowded.
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

Skybound

Well-Known Member
I'm with Penny on this one, your 2nd pic is showing a LOT of clear trics indicating at least another 10 days. FWIW, I ran out of bud yesterday and am smoking 2 month old trim, lol.

Also, about responsiveness, the phosphorus in the fish (and others) trigger enzymes in the plant which then trigger exudates from the roots and any nearby microbes will pounce on the exudates (sugars) and exchange for various ionic nutrients in a beneficiary in common type relationship. To get better insight, I suggest you subscribe to the Doc Bud thread and glean from the many gems dropped there almost every day. Being subbed to that thread has given me a much deeper fuller understanding of how plants grow in synergy with what's in good ground.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Cali #1 was treated with Fish/strap foliar sprays.
Cali #2 was not treated with any foliar spray other than the 100 ppm. meja solution.
The applied hormone interacts with the plants GRN and in fact, the enzymatic signaling pathways are complemented.
I am concerned the energy being used in shade avoidance, that it is not normal for this stage of development. The more I am reading about the balance of homeostasis the more alarmed I become. We may end up with more trichomes, but at what price.

On the other hand, the plant may be responding more favorably than I anticipated. What if this "responsiveness" my friend Sky has discussed, is the plant under demand from the GRN, signaling for the increased production of essential oils and the positioning of the foliar mass has been upgraded in importance to maximize photosynthesis enabling the enzymatic synthesis that produces our oils. This could explain the upgrade in shade avoidance maneuvering value to the plant as interpreted by the genetic regulatory network.

I went to the Doc Bud thread and wholly agree I will benefit greatly from the vast collective knowledge gathered there. It is probably a bit farther down the road before i tackle live soil as I can be a slow learner. And if there is a way to goof it up I would manage to do just that. Live plants alone put me to the test. LOL :)
 

Skybound

Well-Known Member
Until extremely recently, I was purely a hydro grower, yet I was subbed to DB's thread to glean the fundamental basics, that I could transliterate into a more dialed in hydro routine and feeds. That didn't quite pan out as I expected, but I still learned a metric fuckton of useful information that I now apply to my soil experience. FWIW, I (formulated?) my soil routine to about mirror DB's kit, but my conversion from hydro to soil was PURELY my effort to shave the weight of each plant as previously, I gave 1 bloom plant it's own 10 gal res, and I bloomed 3 plants in 3 different bloom rooms. I'm now going to build one big 9x9 room and knock down the 3 small 4x4 rooms. That said, I can't support 90 gallons of weight plus plants and me, so I needed to ditch hydro.

Sorry bout that over explanation, but I wanted to point out that the fundamental basics are what's most important to learn. Knowing them alerts you to which rules can be bent and how far.
 

Maritimer

Well-Known Member
Sorry bout that over explanation, but I wanted to point out that the fundamental basics are what's most important to learn. Knowing them alerts you to which rules can be bent and how far.
Sky,
It is my hope that you will continue to provide "over explanation" of why you do or don't your girls. And please don't misconstrue my blind ambitions to equate the notion of I don't listen or follow your advice. Your mentioning of the hydro-soil switch was timed perfectly. I have been becoming more aware of the fact that a lot of growers I am respecting are bubbleheads. I grow for quality over quantity, and wish I could find empirical evidence to support my belief hydroponics will grow a more complemented cannabinoid profile compared to amended mediums, and that would rationalize the costs. I have not found any such evidence except from folks selling hydro gear. But you basically are a bubblehead without water because of weight restrictions. I have not got those restrictions and it says something to me that you would still prefer to be wet. Plus you taught me a better understanding of ppm just a few weeks ago. Heck, I am almost ready for a splash. ;)
 
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