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First grow outdoors - quick question!

Limon

New Member
Hello 420 users!
Its the first time I start a grow on my own! Ive found plenty of useful article already but theres some things I have been thinking about that I would like to get an answers to.

First some info and the current status:
(seed: 2 Tropical viking auto, 2 Blue mystic auto, 2 random regular)
My seedlings are currently a week old and I plan to plant them outside the 28th of may. I live in the southern part of sweden, the night temprature have been around 6-10 degrees celcius.
Theyve become a bit lanky duo to little light the first few days but Ive moved them closer to a window for both light and wind so they can thicken up a bit (Ill most likely bury the stem when put outside if they dont thicken up enough)

Ive selected a outdoor growing spot, the soil is compact if pressed together but also break apart nicely if pressure is applied. These a lot of space, grass and other vegetation surrounding the area.

Question:
I live near a milkfarm so theres plenty of manure available, my question is, would it be wise to mix the growing soil with fresh manure or would it burn my poor sprouts?
Any suggestion on how I could use manure if now isnt the time? (Other suggestions are welcomed as well)

:thanks:
:peace:
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
If it's composted it's fine, but don't get overboard with the amount you're putting in. For flowering you'll need something rich in potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and calcium as manure might have these elements in small amount. Bat guano or bonemeal will fix you up. I'd recommend mixing them now with soil or topping the soil around late July, early August.
 

Limon

New Member
Thank you for the information, brightlight. Ill see if I can find something else.

If it's composted it's fine, but don't get overboard with the amount you're putting in. For flowering you'll need something rich in potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and calcium as manure might have these elements in small amount. Bat guano or bonemeal will fix you up. I'd recommend mixing them now with soil or topping the soil around late July, early August.

Thank you very much for replying. Conradion! :3 Ill keep that in mind, I'll see if I can find some bone meal around (else theres plenty of bone parts from cow in the area but I just might look into buying bonemeal from store instead)

Do you know when wood ash would be most suitable to use? I found a blog post saying 7,5 dl wood ash and 1dl bonemeal per 50 liter soil is a good mix for tomato plants. The post is in swedish tho, link> (Cesars trädgårdsblogg)

Edit: Found a post about it :3
..."I have a fireplace and after a fire I collect a plastic bag full of the finest ash I can find with very few pieces of charcoal. I add this to my plants not during the veg cycle but about a week into the flowering cycle. This gives the plant a little extra NPK to help it grow big juicy fat buds. If you do not believe me, try it. I grew two clones cut from the exact same plant and both were planted in 3 gallon smart pots. One plant was given just wood ash and the other plant I fed the Fox Farm nutrient line up. The plant I gave straight wood ash had bigger thicker healthier buds and the overall look of the plant was more healthy than the one I fed nutrients.
 

brightlight

Grow Journal of the Month: March 2017
I don't use steer manure, but I've heard what Conradino says, that it should be in small amounts. I use cottonseed, alfalfa, and feather meal along with bat guano for N. All added to a pre-processed mix in advance of planting.

I also don't know about ashes/potash. It may be rather strong in K? I like some K all along the way. I use kelp and Sul Po Mag, aka langbeinite. The SPM is great slow and steady Mg source.

For Ca I use dolomite lime, gypsum, and bonemeal. Soft rock phosphate for P. Greensand and azomite for minerals. LOTS of mycorrhizae.

Sounds like you like organics so hope this info helps.
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Yeah, man.
If you're into real organics we can really help you :)

So to woodash, yeah good idea as it contains a lot of potassoium and small amounts of phosphorus, decomposes in few days, and can shoot the plant out. I used it both on cannabis abd vegetables and found out it works much better when mixed with soil before planting. I actually start treating soil in November to heat up composting processes, then I do it in February. It will help your plant develop more flowers, and juicier too. If you have good sun exposure, and light soil you're set up for vegging and flowering. Then as we all agree you should consider inoculating with mycorrhizae, rhizobacterias, that helps bigtime! Other additives are optional, but I strongly recommend compost for its humic acid content and water-retaining qualities. But the most important thing is plenty of sun and good anti-pest tactics.
 

conradino23

Grow Journal of the Year: 2017 - Grow Journal of the Month: Sept 2017
Yeah, organic section is cool. Might be slow sometimes, but if you come up with the right question you're gonna get plenty of help from very experienced growers. You're welcome to my journal too, hope you're gonna enjoy the ride which goes on in a latitude corresponding well with yours!
 
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