420 Magazine Background

Fluoridated & Chlorinated Water

J Obadiah

Well-Known Member
My Chemistry professor showed us that you can get rid of Chlorine by breaking down covalent bonds (heat, or letting sit), OR you can use your own skin.

Human skin is a super-absorbent organ with the capacity to wick up 80% of materials applied to it through absorption. It gets rid of Chlorine, and partially Chloramine.

So, just swirl your hand around in your res for a few seconds then wait, repeat with other hand for maximum efficiency. I have really chlorinated water here and my microbes are fine. Honestly, though, this process is just a way to help mitigate the harmful effects of Chloramine, Chlorine to a small degree.
 

LiberalThinker

Well-Known Member
My Chemistry professor showed us that you can get rid of Chlorine by breaking down covalent bonds (heat, or letting sit), OR you can use your own skin.

Human skin is a super-absorbent organ with the capacity to wick up 80% of materials applied to it through absorption. It gets rid of Chlorine, and partially Chloramine.

So, just swirl your hand around in your res for a few seconds then wait, repeat with other hand for maximum efficiency. I have really chlorinated water here and my microbes are fine. Honestly, though, this process is just a way to help mitigate the harmful effects of Chloramine, Chlorine to a small degree.
The simplest and most economic solution is to put a quarter of a tablet of 1000mg vitamin c per 10L of water before anything. The reaction is pretty much instant.
 

Remystemple

Well-Known Member
my tap water has chlorine and chloramine in it. i let the water sit 48 hours before using. my friend who works at the treatment plant says the chloramine won't leave the water from just sitting.
I'd have to be promised a good bit of extra yield before i'd be worried about chloramine tho.
 

Virgin ground

Nug of the Month: June 2019 - Photo of the Month: Aug 2019
I have been using aquarium "Tap safe" to sort both chloramine and chlorine out with no issue so far. Small dose cleans a lot of water.
GG check the material safety sheet on any aquarium dechlorinator before use. Some have sodium thiosulfate and formaldehyde in them. These are toxic and carcinogenic.
 

Ganjagrandaddy

Well-Known Member
GG check the material safety sheet on any aquarium dechlorinator before use. Some have sodium thiosulfate and formaldehyde in them. These are toxic and carcinogenic.
never looked but am going to now. thanks virginground. it is from uk chain wilko's. own brand.
 

Remystemple

Well-Known Member
never looked but am going to now. thanks virginground. it is from uk chain wilko's. own brand.
You should consider a side by side. See if fluoride is really worth the hassle. The difference in yield could be next to nothing.
 

LiberalThinker

Well-Known Member
my tap water has chlorine and chloramine in it. i let the water sit 48 hours before using. my friend who works at the treatment plant says the chloramine won't leave the water from just sitting.
I'd have to be promised a good bit of extra yield before i'd be worried about chloramine tho.
One doesn't want to spend money on useful bacteria in the form of living soil or as an additive and then kill them, does one?
 

Remystemple

Well-Known Member
One doesn't want to spend money on useful bacteria in the form of living soil or as an additive and then kill them, does one?
So how much bigger will my buds be if I remove chloramine? Because they're pretty big and healthy as is.
 

LiberalThinker

Well-Known Member
So how much bigger will my buds be if I remove chloramine? Because they're pretty big and healthy as is.
Chloramine is toxic to bacteria - which it's designed to be. If I spend money on cultured bacteria to help and protect my plants, why give something that''s going to kill them? Without those bacteria one is exposing the plants to pathogenic organisms because the job of the good bacteria is to crowd the bad guys out. Another benefit is that they process minerals that are otherwise inaccessible to the plants. If ones method relies on their presence then it makes no sense to harm them. If your method is to cure potential problems after the fact rather than prevent them that's your choice.
 

Gadfly

Well-Known Member
In the past I watered with chloramine water without knowing what it was or that it even existed. And that includes almost completely organic grows. Once I read about chloramine I got weirded out because people talk like its instant death, but it never caused a problem for me...that I’ve noticed. Lol

Most of the plants in my profile are chloramine infused plants :laugh:if memory serves me well. :hmmmm:
 

LiberalThinker

Well-Known Member
In the past I watered with chloramine water without knowing what it was or that it even existed. And that includes almost completely organic grows. Once I read about chloramine I got weirded out because people talk like its instant death, but it never caused a problem for me...that I’ve noticed. Lol

Most of the plants in my profile are chloramine infused plants :laugh:if memory serves me well. :hmmmm:
In a hydroponic situation they are more critical for a stable environment. In soil it's a much more complex, buffering medium that can attenuate adverse chemical effects.
 

Ganjagrandaddy

Well-Known Member
You should consider a side by side. See if fluoride is really worth the hassle. The difference in yield could be next to nothing.
sadly one res feeds all the buckets so cant seperate them. My last crop was successful ( besides other non related screw ups ) using this product. worred about info from virginground but cant find any info from bottle or wilko on what us in it.. srill searching....
 

Remystemple

Well-Known Member
sadly one res feeds all the buckets so cant seperate them. My last crop was successful ( besides other non related screw ups ) using this product. worred about info from virginground but cant find any info from bottle or wilko on what us in it.. srill searching....

MaximumYield explains Chloramine

"Chloramine is a common water conditioner used in drinking water and swimming pools. It’s a preferred disinfectant because it’s not as aggressive as chlorine and more stable than hypochlorite when exposed to light.

Chloramine is also more commonly used for water treatment than chlorine because of its long-term effectiveness. It doesn’t evaporate from the water, which only adds to its effectiveness. It is also safe for animals and plants. However, it is harmful to organisms that take water directly into their bloodstream.

In horticulture, chloramine is as safe as chlorinated water for all gardening uses, including hydroponics, although, some studies did show some root browning in lettuce, which was likely a cause of too much chloramine in the water supply."


Sounds like it's not really that bad for plants at all. more bad for creatures than anything.
 

MotaFina

Well-Known Member
Seachem prime is poisonous to humans. I would use the vitamin C tablets.
I've been using Seachem Prime and I became concerned due to your comment. I checked their Safety Data Sheet and they're not indicating any toxicity or carcinogens. Do you have information they're not telling us? I should switch to vitamin C regardless, but Im wondering about the toxicity of Prime.
 

Virgin ground

Nug of the Month: June 2019 - Photo of the Month: Aug 2019
I've been using Seachem Prime and I became concerned due to your comment. I checked their Safety Data Sheet and they're not indicating any toxicity or carcinogens. Do you have information they're not telling us? I should switch to vitamin C regardless, but Im wondering about the toxicity of Prime.
I was going to do an outdoor Aquaponics grow a couple of years ago. I am a prime user in my fish tanks. Anyway, I contacted them directly. They said that they don't do test on human consumption, and they did not want me to use their product on edibles because of this.

They cannot guarantee your safety, no matter what the MSDS says.

Vitamin C can actually be used by the plant. It is safer and cheaper.
 

Canresearcher

Active Member
You can't chemically separate out Fluorine from CaF2 seeing as it is so incredibly reactive.. Calcium Fluoride occurs as Fluorite naturally in many kinds of rocks, so I really wouldn't worry about it. I really don't understand the paranoia around Fluorine... For one you can't separate it out from compounds easily at all (take a huge amount of energy), and it occurs naturally. Next time you go to the beach, there is fluorite in the sand.
CaF2 is good for teeth btw.
 

BobbyZ

Well-Known Member
You can't chemically separate out Fluorine from CaF2 seeing as it is so incredibly reactive.. Calcium Fluoride occurs as Fluorite naturally in many kinds of rocks, so I really wouldn't worry about it. I really don't understand the paranoia around Fluorine... For one you can't separate it out from compounds easily at all (take a huge amount of energy), and it occurs naturally. Next time you go to the beach, there is fluorite in the sand.
CaF2 is good for teeth btw.
Nope. They don’t add “natural” fluoride to the water. They add the toxic sodium fluoride chemical to the water. The same as most toothpaste. It specifically says “do not swallow”... toxic, danger, call poison control center.
That’s what they ARE putting in your daily drinking water.

Calcium Fluoride is a natural occurrence and Sodium Fluoride is the toxic waste that became a big money maker during the 50’s when waste deposits (Labeled dangerous by the EPA) began showing up in city water. This deceptive practice continues today.
 
Last edited:
Top Bottom