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Germination Speed: What does it say?

meejay

Member
Hello everyone,

Suppose you have germinated three different seeds from a seed-bag;
  • one of the seeds germinate very fast and it is ready to be planted in 3 days
  • second seed germinate moderately fast and it is ready to be planted in in 7 days
  • third seed germinates in 14 days but still cannot reach a length\size as the first one
Considering all three are grown at exactly the same conditions (nuts, pot size, temperature, pH, humidity etc.) and above facts, what would differ on each?
  1. overall growth speed
  2. harvest amount
  3. overall plant health
  4. other variables
 

Apoc

Well-Known Member
Genetics and even then it's somewhat a crapshoot.

It's not uncommon to grow 4 of the same seed, same tent and two will runt and two go crazy.

Germinating times haven't really shown any predisposition for stunted or super plant. More a reflection on germination method and seed condition.
 

meejay

Member
It's not uncommon to grow 4 of the same seed, same tent and two will runt and two go crazy.
So this is a common issue. What I wonder is the result.

Germinating times haven't really shown any predisposition for stunted or super plant. More a reflection on germination method and seed condition.
This was a real life question to be honest. Germination methods were the same. Yet I have different results. I wonder if it is worth allocating resources to the worst performing seed?
 

The Celt

Well-Known Member
Germination rate from a group of seed collected from the same plant is most likely due to the maturity of the seed when the bud was harvested. The more mature the seed, the faster it is likely to germinate, up to a point. Once it matures, but is still on the vine, the shell will become tougher/harder causing slower germination but this is not a bad thing nor does it have a bearing on the quality of the resulting plant.

In the wild, dropped seed will generally need to over winter before germination and a harder shell helps ensure it makes it to spring. Aside from that, birds and other small creatures eat seed and a harder shell will improve its chances of survival in the gut of these animals so that when it is crapped out, somewhere distant from the mother plant, the genetics get spread.

This is a survival technique of many plants and there are some plants whose seed requires the time in an animals gut to soften the shell before it will germinate, thankfully cannabis seed doesn’t require this or we’d all be having to eat our seed and then sort through our crap to find them lol
 

meejay

Member
Germination rate from a group of seed collected from the same plant is most likely due to the maturity of the seed when the bud was harvested. The more mature the seed, the faster it is likely to germinate, up to a point. Once it matures, but is still on the vine, the shell will become tougher/harder causing slower germination but this is not a bad thing nor does it have a bearing on the quality of the resulting plant.

In the wild, dropped seed will generally need to over winter before germination and a harder shell helps ensure it makes it to spring. Aside from that, birds and other small creatures eat seed and a harder shell will improve its chances of survival in the gut of these animals so that when it is crapped out, somewhere distant from the mother plant, the genetics get spread.

This is a survival technique of many plants and there are some plants whose seed requires the time in an animals gut to soften the shell before it will germinate, thankfully cannabis seed doesn’t require this or we’d all be having to eat our seed and then sort through our crap to find them lol
Thanks for the answer. It all makes sense
 

SmokingWings

Well-Known Member
<cut first paragraph>
Considering all three are grown at exactly the same conditions (nuts, pot size, temperature, pH, humidity etc.) and above facts, what would differ on each?
  1. overall growth speed
  2. harvest amount
  3. overall plant health
  4. other variables
@The Celt brings up some good points.

My limited experiences with this is that #1 is the interesting one to consider. The one that took the longest to germinate will tend to grow slower than the others. Not always since sometimes a plant that gets a later start will catch up to the others when grown outside but an inside artificial environment is different. Late start and they do not always catch up.

Does not mean that the plant is a bad grower or that the quality at the end will be bad; that particular plant just grows slow.
 

meejay

Member
@The Celt brings up some good points.

My limited experiences with this is that #1 is the interesting one to consider. The one that took the longest to germinate will tend to grow slower than the others. Not always since sometimes a plant that gets a later start will catch up to the others when grown outside but an inside artificial environment is different. Late start and they do not always catch up.

Does not mean that the plant is a bad grower or that the quality at the end will be bad; that particular plant just grows slow.
Thanks @SmokingWings !
This is a valuable input.
 
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