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Help heat damage

CrazyChef

Well-Known Member

carcass

Well-Known Member
Welcome to 420,Kokeman:welcome:

I'm assuming you grow outside? (more info would be nice)
If you are outside,You need to try and keep that pot (can?) cooler-paint it white,or cover it with white towels or something,and cover the soil also-
If the temp is 100,the pot and the soil in it can easily get hot enough to cook and kill the roots.
And that metal can it's in doesn't help...
In the ground,this isn't a problem,for obvious reasons.
 

TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
They tend to recover on their own (to large extent), assuming conditions improve fairly quickly. What you can do is get it into a larger container so that it can grow a larger root system, which will better allow the plant to take in moisture and transpire moisture via the tiny pores in the undersides of its leaves, which are called stomata. This, especially in the presence of a good wind (fan, indoors), is how oak trees survive those hot Summer days - and why a large one can easily use 50 to 300 gallons of water per day.

Long term, if you expect to see high temperatures now and then, you could consider switching to a DWC hydroponic setup with a large reservoir, extreme aeration, and of course great airflow through the canopy. Then your plants will be even more efficient at this process (and have more water available). Decent-sized plants can and do transpire gallons of water per day when there is a need, assuming they have access to it.
 

TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
I'm assuming you grow outside?
Oops; I hadn't considered that possibility.

(more info would be nice)
:thumb:.

If you are outside,You need to try and keep that pot (can?) cooler-paint it white,or cover it with white towels or something,and cover the soil also-
If the temp is 100,the pot and the soil in it can easily get hot enough to cook and kill the roots.
In the ground,this isn't a problem,for obvious reasons.
Maybe it's possible to transplant it directly into the ground?
 

George Mc

Well-Known Member
Yes it's solely outside IL going to put it in a bigger pot. Should I trim the leaves off that are curling up and browning
Let the plant remove any nutrients it wants from the curling or Browning leaves. If you cut them off the plant might start pulling nutrients from other leaves and then you'll cut those off and so on and so on and then you're screwed. When the plant is done with them they will die and fall off okay.
 

TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
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