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High Altitude Growing

Mountainguy

New Member
Well, I haven't grown any for 40 years, but I thought I would give it a shot. I live at 7000 ft in the Sierra Nevada. Late snow and low spring temps made outside growing difficult (indoor grow not feasible for me). I started my Hash Plants indoors in small pots, next to a south facing window. I gradually acclimated them to the cold nights (in mid to high 30's some nights even in July. Supposedly this strain is a 2 month grow. Germinated June 1, cotyledons June 4, and by July 15 they were spindly 4 inch plants. Transplanted them to larger pots with vitamin B transplant stuff. I think I over nitrogenated them when I started nutrients a couple of weeks later, and one has burn on the lower leaves, but I immediately flushed and they survived. August 1 they were 11 inches, now 18 inches and growing 1/2 per day with a nice fan canopy. I selected these because they were allegedly from a high altitude region in Afghanistan. I am sure the cold weather retarded early growth, but the weather is getting warm (still night temps in low 50's, though) and they seem to be taking off on vegetative growth, I plan to let nature take it's course on flowering unless really early snow/frost is predicted. Any advice would be appreciated. Stay tuned.
 

SnowBender

New Member
:welcome:

Can you add some 'Thermal Mass' arround the plants to help meditate temperatures?

Water barrels, rocks, bricks ect...

Are they in pots still or ground?



I lived 5 years at 7500 ft near truckee, but did not grow outside. My friends that did , say its all about the strain, timing and LUCK.

Can you put a roof over their heads?
-there were years we got 6 inches of snow/slush in july and aug.
 

Mountainguy

New Member
Still in pots. There is always a threat of heavy hail at any time during summer and fall, so portability is advisable . Thermal mass is a good idea, should of thought of that..duh. People use water grow walls here for tomatoes for that reason (tomatoes do not set fruit below 55 degrees). I should try that next year. A water grow wall would also lend itself to a lid for hail protection, and you cannot QUITE see what is growing within the wall from a distance (until they get 3 feet tall) . Excellent! :thanks: I should say that I also needed portability because a part time neighbor can see the ideal location, but not a less than ideal location, so I move the "girls" (optimism is good!) depending upon the neighbor's time in residence. From their early slow, spindly growth, they are doing amazingly well in August. Reading up on high altitude photosynthesis and CO2 utilization. Most data is about REALLY high altitude, though, so nothing too useful so far. Sunlight at 7000 ft is intense, though. Humans with white skin get sunburn in 5 minutes, so plants have to be sucking it up.
 

GaladrielDreams

New Member
I'm in, I'm at 9,107 ft alt. in between the Front Range, and the Collegiates in CO. Although I am indoors, I am curious as to how the plants would grow outdoors at that altitude. We get frequent hail, and I would have to rig some sort of Cold Frame for them to survive our late springs, and early frosts/snows.

Good Luck with your grow!
 

420

Founder
420 Staff
Is this grow still alive?
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I am moving this to abandoned journals until we get updates.

Thanks and hope all is well in your world!

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Altitude High

New Member
I'm at 9200' and am attempting my first crop in a very long time. I started 5 Master Kush plants in the spring and moved them outdoors on June 1st. So far my plants have thrived and are just entering the flowering or perhaps preflowering stage. I'm concerned about the quick end we have to our growing season up here. We can sometimes make it into late Oct without snow but could also get our first snow in late Sept. Any advice on growing in these conditions would be appreciated.
 
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