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How can I tell whether my drooping plant is overwatered or underwatered?

Malcolm

New Member
Rather than depend on waiting for the appearance of the foliage to indicate whether or not your plants are in need of H2O, why not just use the medium to be your guide. Soak it completely through and then every couple of days or so, stick your finger in the medium up to the knuckle. The average human knuckle is about two inches long, seriously. I can just see all the heads checking this thread out sitting there measuring their knuckles right now, lol. Anyway, two inches is a good depth to determine if your medium needs water or not. If the top two inches is dry, water. If damp or moist, chill and check it again the next day and so forth. Plants take time to recover from any stressfull situation and both growth and flower development will suffer as a result. Hope this helps...:peace:
 

3lions

On Vacation
Thanks man..

Yeahh kinda know of the finger trick (altho we do have 2 knuckles on the finger lol) it may sound daft but not sure if it feels wet or damp or dry, maybe I just have a lack of feeling in the fingers lol.

Is there not a tool that measures moisture like that?
 

Malcolm

New Member
Thanks man..

Yeahh kinda know of the finger trick (altho we do have 2 knuckles on the finger lol) it may sound daft but not sure if it feels wet or damp or dry, maybe I just have a lack of feeling in the fingers lol.

Is there not a tool that measures moisture like that?
The second knuckle is for playing around in a different kind of "soil", lol. Eventually you will get a feel for when they are in need but until then, there is a "Moisture Meter" you can purchase for under twenty bucks that will tell what the moisture level is either with a numbering or wording scale. They are easy to use and will help you establish a schedual that will help you know when to water or not. As the plants grow they will transpire more and more water through their foliage thus needing more water in the medium. Container size also factors in to the equation as well. A large plant in a small container will use more water than one in an appropriate size for the plant. Humidity also matters. Higher humidity means the plants will transpire less water, lower humidity, more water...:peace:
 

Weed420

New Member
I like to either get the pots with the bigger holes in the bottom or drill a one inch hole in the side by the bottom so I can stick a finger in to see what it feels like.
 

TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
Thanks man..

Yeahh kinda know of the finger trick (altho we do have 2 knuckles on the finger lol) it may sound daft but not sure if it feels wet or damp or dry, maybe I just have a lack of feeling in the fingers lol.

Is there not a tool that measures moisture like that?

Yeah, it's called a popsicle stick. :laugh2:

Ask your wife and/or mother about testing doneness of baked goods with toothpicks - same principle.
 

3lions

On Vacation
You cant look at the soil half way down the pot which is where it needs to be of the right moisture content really.

"Ask your wife and/or mother about testing doneness of baked goods with toothpicks - same principle"

pmsl, women don't bake nowadays Im sure, I think the best way has been judging by weight, weigh em dry, weigh em soaked blahh blahh lol
 

Malcolm

New Member
You cant look at the soil half way down the pot which is where it needs to be of the right moisture content really.

"Ask your wife and/or mother about testing doneness of baked goods with toothpicks - same principle"

pmsl, women don't bake nowadays Im sure, I think the best way has been judging by weight, weigh em dry, weigh em soaked blahh blahh lol
The moisture will "wick" up towards the top soil. Thats why when you set a container in standing water, the water will eventually wick it's way from the bottom up. If the top two inches or so of medium is moist then you should be ok. Lifting the container and feeling the heft works too. If your temp and humidity does not vary much within the grow space then getting into a "watering"groove so to speak, should not be to difficult. It's not rocket science...:smokin:
 

sunshineEtron

New Member
Hey how do I know if I am under or over watering? I am new at this stuff... rooted clones are in 4" pots and I can see a few roots starting to emerge from the bottom. Currently I am giving each plant about 60ml every day but I am not sure if it is enough... Should I be soaking them once a week?
 

DoobieBrother

New Member
This is being over-complicated: water every two or three days (at first, when plants are small - more often when the are larger..,.duh!). Do not rely on schedules, finger tests, just use your common sense. If the pot is very light and the soil looks bone dry, it's time to water. Do so until excess water drips out slowly from the pot holes - you may have to add several liters to saturate the soil before the excess stops quickly poring out. To clarify, when very dry, if your soil-mix has the proper consistency, the first few liters of water should drop right through the entire pot. You need to saturate the roots, but not drown them.

If the plants are happy, the pot feels heavier than when bone dry, do not water.

The biggest newbie problem is over-watering. If in doubt, DON'T!
 

DoobieBrother

New Member
my seedling looks lifeless and it wont stand up help some one

It may be just stretching for light. How close to the light source is it? You should be using fluoros for seedlings, which allows you to place them very close without fear of burning.

Get some sort of support, a popsicle stick will work, just be careful not to damage any frail rooms. Tape it to the outside of your container, than delicately use a small piece of yarn to tie it up.

Hope this helps.

Oh, btw, I am new here, but not new to growing! Been doing this for over 20 years.....
 

Balller91

New Member
First time grower here and can't figure out what happened. I've been growing a couple plants in a closet and wanted to give them some outside air and light during the day and this plant was out there for not even 45 minutes. Before the leaves were really drooping down and thought it was lack of sun. But some of the leaves just from leaving them outside like curled up. Can somebody tell me if the leaves are drooping because of too much water or what? Or is it underwatered because of what the leaves did while outside?

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