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How To Reverse Sex Using Silver Thiosulfate Solution

Dkmg01

Grow Journal of the Month: February 2020
Fantastic post! :thumb: . I did read through about the autos and maybe I missed it but how would I introduce the auto genetic? Let's say I order an auto and I want to introduce that genetic to my purple haze once the auto is of age or would I still need 2 autos?
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019, May 2020 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017

GardeningGnome

Well-Known Member
Great bit of knowledge right here! Thanks go to Smokin Moose.


I've read about a similar approach using colloidal silver instead of silver thiosulfate. A DuckDuckGo or Google search of "colloidal silver royal queen" will give you the article over at Royal Queen Seeds that provides more information on the colloidal silver method. Also reading the same article as other seem to have, think it is the same as @Pennywise is referring to. It is on my todo-list to try when the clones are rooted and I have the space to create some fathers. I'll make sure to keep you guys informed.

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Old Salt

Member of the Year: 2019 - Member of the Month: Apr, Nov 2019
Such a great tutorial, and I hope to give this a try someday, but does this not technically hermie the subjected plant, and pass on the hermie trait to the offspring?
Yes, technically it's a forced hermie. However, the trait is not passed on.
 

Stunger

Well-Known Member
I don't think @toker69 is about any more but I found his thread very interesting on using Colloidal Silver to reverse sex.
 

DutchinAB

Well-Known Member
This intrigues me, how can the seeds differentiate between selfed or stressed pollination? I assume when sprayed with the sts it is a stressed reaction that turns into male flowers to allow the mother plant to fulfill her life cycle?

I am not questioning the method here, I am just generally curious and have to ask why and how to most things.
 

Old Salt

Member of the Year: 2019 - Member of the Month: Apr, Nov 2019
Silver thiosulfate (STS) is commonly used to block the action of ethylene in plant cell cultures. Ethylene is a hormone that is present in the gaseous state. Ethylene increases during senescence (aging, flower development) and ripening, and has been shown to increase in plant cell cultures due to wounding or the presence of auxins. Silver nitrate may be used alone to block the action of ethylene but it is not transported as well as STS thus is seldom used alone.

Ethylene is a hormone produced by female plants and used to build pistilate flowers. Ionized silver inhibits ethylene production so the plant will produce staminate flowers instead. The are every bit as stable as their male counter parts. Being genetically female the pollen sacs can only produce pollen with female chromosomes. 99.9% of the offspring will be female.
 

Pennywise

Member of the Year: 2017 - Member of the Month: Mar & Oct 2017, Aug 2018, May 2019, May 2020 - Plant of the Month: Aug 2017
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