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Hows & Whys Of Supercropping

HorseBadoritz

Well-Known Member
Thanks HB! Though you can't be too old a geezer if you are growing in a crawl space under a house. Of course, 6' isn't really a crawl space :3:.
Older than dirt, that's why I stick with the coco, lol! And that 6' doesn't account for all the ducting, and wiring, and poop pipes, or that I'm 6'2"...I have the head scars to prove it! But, it's the perfect place for a slob like me to grow in!

Mon the supercropping!
 

Stunger

Well-Known Member
Older than dirt, that's why I stick with the coco, lol! And that 6' doesn't account for all the ducting, and wiring, and poop pipes, or that I'm 6'2"...I have the head scars to prove it! But, it's the perfect place for a slob like me to grow in!

Mon the supercropping!
I am intrigued, any chance of a picture of the space you're growing and crawling in. :bong:
 

HorseBadoritz

Well-Known Member
I am intrigued, any chance of a picture of the space you're growing and crawling in. :bong:
It's kind of embarrassing, but just kind of, lol!
DSCN5929.jpgDSCN5931.jpgDSCN5932.jpgDSCN5933.jpgDSCN5934.jpgDSCN5935.jpgDSCN5936.jpgDSCN5937.jpgDSCN5938.jpgDSCN5939.jpg

It was bit of a shop/storage/catchall when I started, and as you can see, I've cleaned it up since, lol!

Had to shove the mover track up between the joists.

No crawling actually involved, but a lot of scrunching over in between the knock out stops at the turd pipes!
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
What a great space HB! I wish I had that under my house because it would look just like yours. :high-five:

A hardhat would make an excellent investment.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Stunger

Well-Known Member
It's kind of embarrassing, but just kind of, lol!

It was bit of a shop/storage/catchall when I started, and as you can see, I've cleaned it up since, lol!

Had to shove the mover track up between the joists.

No crawling actually involved, but a lot of scrunching over in between the knock out stops at the turd pipes!
Great stuff HB. Yes I can the usefulness of hard hats! Your plants are looking sticky and potent too. :thumb:
 

RXOIL

Member
Anyone interested in a bit on supercropping? Here is my introduction to the technique. I don't deal so much on the actual way to perform a supercrop, but the reasons and places to do it:

DISCLAIMER: This is high stress plant training and I do not recommend it for an autoflower plant. Not that you won't see people do it to theirs, I just don't recommend it. It definitely slows down the plant while it recovers.

Supercropping is a technique where you bend the stem at something close to a 90º angle, snapping the internal fibers of the plant in the process. It can be done in flower, though it's usually performed in veg. There are loads of videos on how to do it so I won't go into a detailed description. Generally, you squeeze the stem where you want the bend to be until you feel the plant's tissue give way, and then lay the upper part of the branch over at a right angle.

With thinner or woodier stems that are harder to crush, I rock them back and forth over my thumbnail until they soften enough to lay over.

The stem eventually forms a "knuckle" at the bend, and it increases the nutrient pathways to the top part of that branch. That's not usually why we do it, but it's another positive result. And if done early in flower (like at the end of stretch when you know who are the leaders), it can result in larger buds on that branch.

Now let's talk about why we supercrop our plants. The traditional reason is that it keeps the plant canopy level, making all your potential bud-sites the same distance from the lights. In this instance, the leaders are bent at the level of the rest of the canopy, usually toward the outside edge of the tent so as not to cover lower growth.

But there are other reasons to use this technique, for both indoor and outdoor growers (who don't need a level canopy).

Besides leveling the canopy, here are two additional reasons to supercrop.

First, to greatly increase the number of bud-sites. Every time you flatten a branch, everything that would have been larf can now become a new top. Here is where I bent an AK-47 branch:




And here is how many new tops were created by that one bend:



All of that lower growth will now head directly toward the light.

[Note that when you are thinning your undergrowth, keep the supercrop option in mind. If you strip everything underneath there will be no shoots to grow new tops. So if you plan on supercropping, thin with the future in mind.]

And second, supercropping to make room for other supercropping! In this example I bent branch that has no lower branches to grow up, but I've bent it away to clear room to bend a different branch that does have lower branches that I want to expose. (Read the boxes in numbered order so it makes sense.):


If I had just bent the top branch it would have covered the bud-sites on the lower branch, so I bent that out of the way first.

And I will often bend a branch into the middle of a plant so the plant doesn't get too wide, as long as there is an empty spot to fill in, or some weak growth below you will be pruning at some point anyway. You can see an example of that here:

Top left was supercropped inward to keep it within the existing outer circle of the plant, and middle left was cropped outward to fill in the space.

One last trick, for those crops that refuse to stay down, attach a small binder clip to a paper clip and hang that from the branch (you can just make out the paper clip at the arrow):


Two final pics. This is an AK-47 where I used all these techniques:



6.3 ounces and Plant of the Month!

Questions welcome. :Namaste:
Beautiful plant!
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

Cotarakos

Well-Known Member
Anyone interested in a bit on supercropping? Here is my introduction to the technique. I don't deal so much on the actual way to perform a supercrop, but the reasons and places to do it:

DISCLAIMER: This is high stress plant training and I do not recommend it for an autoflower plant. Not that you won't see people do it to theirs, I just don't recommend it. It definitely slows down the plant while it recovers.

Supercropping is a technique where you bend the stem at something close to a 90º angle, snapping the internal fibers of the plant in the process. It can be done in flower, though it's usually performed in veg. There are loads of videos on how to do it so I won't go into a detailed description. Generally, you squeeze the stem where you want the bend to be until you feel the plant's tissue give way, and then lay the upper part of the branch over at a right angle.

With thinner or woodier stems that are harder to crush, I rock them back and forth over my thumbnail until they soften enough to lay over.

The stem eventually forms a "knuckle" at the bend, and it increases the nutrient pathways to the top part of that branch. That's not usually why we do it, but it's another positive result. And if done early in flower (like at the end of stretch when you know who are the leaders), it can result in larger buds on that branch.

Now let's talk about why we supercrop our plants. The traditional reason is that it keeps the plant canopy level, making all your potential bud-sites the same distance from the lights. In this instance, the leaders are bent at the level of the rest of the canopy, usually toward the outside edge of the tent so as not to cover lower growth.

But there are other reasons to use this technique, for both indoor and outdoor growers (who don't need a level canopy).

Besides leveling the canopy, here are two additional reasons to supercrop.

First, to greatly increase the number of bud-sites. Every time you flatten a branch, everything that would have been larf can now become a new top. Here is where I bent an AK-47 branch:




And here is how many new tops were created by that one bend:



All of that lower growth will now head directly toward the light.

[Note that when you are thinning your undergrowth, keep the supercrop option in mind. If you strip everything underneath there will be no shoots to grow new tops. So if you plan on supercropping, thin with the future in mind.]

And second, supercropping to make room for other supercropping! In this example I bent branch that has no lower branches to grow up, but I've bent it away to clear room to bend a different branch that does have lower branches that I want to expose. (Read the boxes in numbered order so it makes sense.):


If I had just bent the top branch it would have covered the bud-sites on the lower branch, so I bent that out of the way first.

And I will often bend a branch into the middle of a plant so the plant doesn't get too wide, as long as there is an empty spot to fill in, or some weak growth below you will be pruning at some point anyway. You can see an example of that here:

Top left was supercropped inward to keep it within the existing outer circle of the plant, and middle left was cropped outward to fill in the space.

One last trick, for those crops that refuse to stay down, attach a small binder clip to a paper clip and hang that from the branch (you can just make out the paper clip at the arrow):


Two final pics. This is an AK-47 where I used all these techniques:



6.3 ounces and Plant of the Month!

Questions welcome. :Namaste:
Impressive.....
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Thanks Scott! Not much going on here, so if you're looking for company you should come back to my grow journal. :ciao:
 

Fudo Myoo

Well-Known Member
Anyone interested in a bit on supercropping? Here is my introduction to the technique. I don't deal so much on the actual way to perform a supercrop, but the reasons and places to do it:

DISCLAIMER: This is high stress plant training and I do not recommend it for an autoflower plant. Not that you won't see people do it to theirs, I just don't recommend it. It definitely slows down the plant while it recovers.

Supercropping is a technique where you bend the stem at something close to a 90º angle, snapping the internal fibers of the plant in the process. It can be done in flower, though it's usually performed in veg. There are loads of videos on how to do it so I won't go into a detailed description. Generally, you squeeze the stem where you want the bend to be until you feel the plant's tissue give way, and then lay the upper part of the branch over at a right angle.

With thinner or woodier stems that are harder to crush, I rock them back and forth over my thumbnail until they soften enough to lay over.

The stem eventually forms a "knuckle" at the bend, and it increases the nutrient pathways to the top part of that branch. That's not usually why we do it, but it's another positive result. And if done early in flower (like at the end of stretch when you know who are the leaders), it can result in larger buds on that branch.

Now let's talk about why we supercrop our plants. The traditional reason is that it keeps the plant canopy level, making all your potential bud-sites the same distance from the lights. In this instance, the leaders are bent at the level of the rest of the canopy, usually toward the outside edge of the tent so as not to cover lower growth.

But there are other reasons to use this technique, for both indoor and outdoor growers (who don't need a level canopy).

Besides leveling the canopy, here are two additional reasons to supercrop.

First, to greatly increase the number of bud-sites. Every time you flatten a branch, everything that would have been larf can now become a new top. Here is where I bent an AK-47 branch:




And here is how many new tops were created by that one bend:



All of that lower growth will now head directly toward the light.

[Note that when you are thinning your undergrowth, keep the supercrop option in mind. If you strip everything underneath there will be no shoots to grow new tops. So if you plan on supercropping, thin with the future in mind.]

And second, supercropping to make room for other supercropping! In this example I bent branch that has no lower branches to grow up, but I've bent it away to clear room to bend a different branch that does have lower branches that I want to expose. (Read the boxes in numbered order so it makes sense.):


If I had just bent the top branch it would have covered the bud-sites on the lower branch, so I bent that out of the way first.

And I will often bend a branch into the middle of a plant so the plant doesn't get too wide, as long as there is an empty spot to fill in, or some weak growth below you will be pruning at some point anyway. You can see an example of that here:

Top left was supercropped inward to keep it within the existing outer circle of the plant, and middle left was cropped outward to fill in the space.

One last trick, for those crops that refuse to stay down, attach a small binder clip to a paper clip and hang that from the branch (you can just make out the paper clip at the arrow):


Two final pics. This is an AK-47 where I used all these techniques:



6.3 ounces and Plant of the Month!

Questions welcome. :Namaste:
@InTheShed, ok got it. I’m in the beginning of the 3rd week of flower. So it’s safe to do? Pretty sure stretch is done. Can I prune a little more too? Thanks
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
@InTheShed, ok got it. I’m in the beginning of the 3rd week of flower. So it’s safe to do? Pretty sure stretch is done. Can I prune a little more too? Thanks
I take off undergrowth flowers that I don't want any time I spot one, even two weeks from harvest (#nolarf)! And you can supercrop 3 weeks into flower, though I would be much more careful not to split the stem open compared to doing it in veg.

Just get a good bend to it, and you can add a pipe cleaner to hold it down, or some weight like I did here with a binder clip on a paper clip:
 

Fudo Myoo

Well-Known Member
I take off undergrowth flowers that I don't want any time I spot one, even two weeks from harvest (#nolarf)! And you can supercrop 3 weeks into flower, though I would be much more careful not to split the stem open compared to doing it in veg.

Just get a good bend to it, and you can add a pipe cleaner to hold it down, or some weight like I did here with a binder clip on a paper clip:
Thanks Shed I’ll do it tomorrow. I’ll prune a little more too, but not too much for I am chicken lol.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Thanks Shed I’ll do it tomorrow. I’ll prune a little more too, but not too much for I am chicken lol.
You get more confident with every grow!
 

Grand Daddy Black

Well-Known Member
It's kind of embarrassing, but just kind of, lol!
DSCN5929.jpgDSCN5931.jpgDSCN5932.jpgDSCN5933.jpgDSCN5934.jpgDSCN5935.jpgDSCN5936.jpgDSCN5937.jpgDSCN5938.jpgDSCN5939.jpg

It was bit of a shop/storage/catchall when I started, and as you can see, I've cleaned it up since, lol!

Had to shove the mover track up between the joists.

No crawling actually involved, but a lot of scrunching over in between the knock out stops at the turd pipes!
Looks like you've got everything you need down there! :laugh2: :green_heart:
 
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