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Humidity too high

wufo

New Member
Hi, I'm having a humidity problem, its too high 80% two weeks into flower and I'm seeing signs of powder mildew, I have plenty of air circulating and my inline fan is circulating air right...I have slight negative pressure which is ok. But the outside air is about 70% rh, it's dragging in, and a dehumidifier is out of the question cos it's a mega stealth grown, and to get to it is hard. I'm scared that I'm gonna have to pull it out cos its only gonna get worse with the heat wave we r gonna get soon. Is there any way I can get it lower? Thanks.
 

Brick Top

New Member
Calcium chloride is used to melt snow and ice but it will also suck moisture out of the air like a sponge. Take two buckets, drill small drain holes in the bottom of one, or better yet remove a good sized portion of the bottom and replace it with a heavy wire screen. Then fix the second bucket so the first will slide into it but only a short distance. The top bucket contains the calcium chloride and it will draw water out of the air and it will drip into the bottom bucket which you empty on a regular basis. As the calcium chloride dissolves from the humidity you add more.

Many chain hardware stores, and maybe places like Walmart too, sell small pre-made products/setups like that for closets and boating goods stores, like probably Overton's, sells them to put in covered boats for Winter storage so humidity doesn't build up and cause mold and mildew on the seats and in the carpeting. Depending on the size area and what you are willing to spend you might just want to purchase several like that and use as many as are needed or as one is used up have another handy to replace the other with.
 

labexperiment

Well-Known Member
Calcium chloride is used to melt snow and ice but it will also suck moisture out of the air like a sponge. Take two buckets, drill small drain holes in the bottom of one, or better yet remove a good sized portion of the bottom and replace it with a heavy wire screen. Then fix the second bucket so the first will slide into it but only a short distance. The top bucket contains the calcium chloride and it will draw water out of the air and it will drip into the bottom bucket which you empty on a regular basis. As the calcium chloride dissolves from the humidity you add more.

Many chain hardware stores, and maybe places like Walmart too, sell small pre-made products/setups like that for closets and boating goods stores, like probably Overton's, sells them to put in covered boats for Winter storage so humidity doesn't build up and cause mold and mildew on the seats and in the carpeting. Depending on the size area and what you are willing to spend you might just want to purchase several like that and use as many as are needed or as one is used up have another handy to replace the other with.


A.K.A. rock salt.
 

Brick Top

New Member
Originally Posted by Brick Top View Post
Calcium chloride is used to melt snow and ice but it will also suck moisture out of the air like a sponge. Take two buckets, drill small drain holes in the bottom of one, or better yet remove a good sized portion of the bottom and replace it with a heavy wire screen. Then fix the second bucket so the first will slide into it but only a short distance. The top bucket contains the calcium chloride and it will draw water out of the air and it will drip into the bottom bucket which you empty on a regular basis. As the calcium chloride dissolves from the humidity you add more.

Many chain hardware stores, and maybe places like Walmart too, sell small pre-made products/setups like that for closets and boating goods stores, like probably Overton's, sells them to put in covered boats for Winter storage so humidity doesn't build up and cause mold and mildew on the seats and in the carpeting. Depending on the size area and what you are willing to spend you might just want to purchase several like that and use as many as are needed or as one is used up have another handy to replace the other with.


A.K.A. rock salt.


Bot yes and no, like how some people call their SUV their car. Both a car and a SUV transport people but there is still a difference. Rock salt is a mineral formed from sodium chloride (brine from salt water). It's chemical formula is NaCl and his also includes other variations of salt such as common salt and table salt.

Calcium chloride, CaCl2, is a salt of calcium and chlorine. So it's rock salt that through a multi-step process results in chlorine being added.

So they are similar, as are a car and an SUV, but neither are the same just as a car and an SUV are not the same, and Calcium chloride is better, more efficient, at absorbing moisture/humidity. That is why it is used for that purpose and the less expensive substance, rock salt, isn't.


Additional: Example of dehumidifying products, none being rock salt.

Standard Damp Away is one of the calcium chloride products but they also make a product called Damp Away II which is an odorless, non-toxic substance that uses a no-drip container system to remove moisture out of the air to help keep mold and mildew in check. It's non-corrosive with no harsh chemicals being emitted, Damp Away II bags can be reused by rejuvenating them up to three times in a microwave oven.

A quick Google search for Damp Away or Damp Away II will find numerous places to purchase one, the other or both from. They can also likely be found in many local chain stores like Lowes Home Improvement, Sears and probably Walmart stores.

DampRid FG50T Hi-Capacity Moisture Absorber is another product that is similar to the regular Damp Away. Depending on where it would be purchased and if locally or shipped four pounds of it can cost right around or even under $10.00.

I've used Damp Away in my boats for Winter storage for years and I have never uncovered one in the Spring and found mold and mildew and here in my area of N.C. we don't have cold dry low humidity Winters.
 
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