420 Magazine Background

I think they should sue their cities.

mcwow

New Member
Chehalis denies application for medical marijuana dispensary
After getting prescriptions for medical marijuana a couple weeks ago and sampling strains of cannabis from a Tacoma dispensary, Forrest Amos and a friend realized a need for such a storefront in Chehalis.


Bonney Lake deems medical marijuana business illegal

Port Orchard may nip pot dispensaries in the bud

WA Senate OKs changes to medical marijuana system

Medicinal pot patients might get protections

City to wait for clarity on pot law

From: THE CHRONICLE, CENTRALIA, WASH.
Published: 12/17/10 5:37 am

After getting prescriptions for medical marijuana a couple weeks ago and sampling strains of cannabis from a Tacoma dispensary, Forrest Amos and a friend realized a need for such a storefront in Chehalis.

The city of Chehalis quickly nipped Amos' business application in the bud. The rejection came Friday by e-mail in less than 24 hours.

Amos, 27, was stunned.

Then Tuesday, the Washington Department of Revenue confirmed launching a statewide effort last week to collect sales tax from medical marijuana dispensaries.

"We'll pay the taxes, we'll run it with regulation, and the state could get its revenue off it," Amos, who works part time for a cleaning company, advocated Wednesday for his own marijuana dispensary in downtown Chehalis.

Marijuana dispensaries abound in the Seattle area, especially King County.

But the state Department of Health and many county prosecutors deem such dispensaries illegal.

The Chehalis Police Department, which conferred with the city on the business-application rejection, agrees. Police Chief Glenn Schaffer refers to the law that says providers can grow medical marijuana for patients, but providers can serve only one patient at a time.

"If you want to grow marijuana for me and three of my friends, that's not fine," Schaffer said.

Schaffer added it remains illegal to sell marijuana in the state.

Amos and his friend, who wished to remain anonymous, point to part of the law that says marijuana patients can hold up to 24 ounces of pot for personal use at a time and providers can maintain up to 15 plants. Between the two aspiring business partners' medical marijuana prescriptions, they could hold three pounds of marijuana in a store at a time.

Their inventory would come from excess grown by other providers.

"We would give them a donation for their time and material and then we would dispense (marijuana) to patients," Amos said.

Dispensaries elsewhere in the state often work as collectives where patients grow pot together.

Amos said the closest dispensary to Chehalis is in the Tacoma area. He sought a prescription for medical marijuana to relieve chronic neck pain he's suffered since being in a car wreck in 1999.

Chehalis Community Development Director Bob Nacht said Amos and his friend have the right to appeal the rejection of the business application they submitted for "Organicare."

Amos said they intend to do so.

But Nacht made it clear an appeal would not change the city's stance on licensing a marijuana dispensary.

"The city will not dispense a business license to anybody to dispense marijuana," Nacht said.

Copyright (c) 2010, The Chronicle, Centralia, Wash.



Read more: Chehalis denies application for medical marijuana dispensary | Health News - The News Tribune
 

Weed420

New Member
All these zoning laws have always been unconstitutional. Fighting for these dispensaries maybe a good way to press the issue on zoning ordinances. They can not ban any business from opening, they can only regulate it to make sure it complies with state and county laws.
 
Top Bottom