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Icemann420 Grows LSD 25 From Fast Buds In DWC

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Oh boy, hope not LOL. Tomorrow marks a week for me giving my flowering plants sea salt.
Actually, true sea salt is not the same as rock salt or table salt for anyone interested. Sodium chloride will kill your plants. There is much less NaCl in sea salt.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Only if you know offhand (if not don’t worry about it), assuming a plant was experiencing an adverse reaction to sea salt, what are the tell tale signs? Or starter signs?
The effects of NaCl on plants:

"Sodium and chloride ions separate when salts are dissolved in water. The dissolved sodium and chloride ions, in high concentrations, can displace other mineral nutrients in the soil. Plants then absorb the chlorine and sodium instead of needed plant nutrients such as potassium and phosphorus, leading to deficiencies. The chloride ions can be transported to the leaves where they interfere with photosynthesis and chlorophyll production. Chloride accumulation can reach toxic levels, causing leaf burn and die-back.

"Rock salt also causes damage when salt laden snow is plowed or shoveled onto lawns and garden beds. Salts in the soil can absorb water. This results in less water being available for uptake by the plants, increasing water stress and root dehydration. This is referred to as physiological drought, which, if not corrected, can lead to reduced plant growth."

From here:

tl;dr What Penny said!
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
It turns out the chemical makeup of sea salt is different enough from table/rock salt to make a big difference to whether it's good or bad for plants.
 

Aroxol

Well-Known Member
This is my blend, source locally from a gypsy dwarf (she’s a good ship). If it contains magnesium and other trace minerals and macro/micro nutrients plants like, I’m surprised there’s such a high danger of it killing the plants. I’ll stay the course, and if the plants survive we’ll have rewritten history, and if they die you can shake your heads in disappointment and say, “we told you so.”

A0E6DC1E-9334-44C8-AB0C-D2ADAB021752.jpeg
 

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2020
Very bizarre how opposing various data sources are on this topic. Varied enough for me to render both sides useless. You want something done right you’ve got to do it yourself I suppose. I’ll let you know if my plants start dying.


Well I can offer up a solution, hahahaha see what I did there?

Kelp
Kelp Meal
Kelp tea

Gonna have everything the salt has and non-toxic to anything.

Edit: prolly can add some of your "special" salt in there too.

Also, you like collecting stuff from old oceans?

Check out red coral deposits. Lithuanium I think its called.

Conrad speaks high-ly of it. I'm on board. lol

Toss in a handful worm castings and we really have something. An observation.
 

Aroxol

Well-Known Member
I’m building out my own amended coco mix, and I’m about 80% dialed in to what I’ll call the mega chronic mix. The parts I’m exploring right now are calcium and magnesium, these are very problematic under LED with my specific water source (it’s ultra purified water 0-5ppm). The canned cal-mag supplements aren’t giving me the right ratios, so I’ve been toying with sea salt pre-infused into water for several days before feeding to a specific EC, and using Age Old Calcium Carbonate 20%.

So far so good on plant health, but calcium carbonate is not very water soluble (at all), and the ones that are typically contain too much nitrogen. I can use it as a foliar feed, but I’d prefer to have it in my soup. The other challenge is it raises pH quite a bit. So I’m going to mix it in my blend and do a few runoff tests to see how jacked it is.

Sea salt on the other hand has been about the easiest thing ever, and so far seems to be working fine. So either I’ve got the dose dialed in, or it just takes a while to poison my plants.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018, 2020 - Grow Journal of the Year: 2020 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018, Jan & Aug 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018, Dec 2020 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Great info GCA! :goodluck:
 

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2020
Chlorophyll molecular formula = C55H72O5N4Mg

See the Mg there on the end??

Only 1 molecule

Not sure why you like Mg so much. It's not the main ingredient.

Look to Ca - soluble forms for a fast and fresh BAP (big ass plant),
 

bobrown14

Grow Journal of the Month: Dec 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2020
You guys have any other ideas on pure calcium amendments? I’m talking to the organic experts, there’s gotta be some shell for that, right? LOL

Not gonna ever be "pure" Ca input.

Soluble is what you want and also long term source for soil.

Oyster shell flour
Crustacean meal
Gypsum
All 3 good
 

Aroxol

Well-Known Member
Lol I appreciate you guys, but I get the sense my posts weren’t read completely. I know epsom salt can be used for magnesium. I know that a soluble calcium would be ideal.

BUT, I’m testing sea salt for a new blend I’m building as the additional trace minerals may have inherent benefits to healthier plants (similar to kelp).

AND, the soluble calciums are typically too chalked full of nitrogen and/or a different form of calcium, or only come in 5 gallon containers from professional agriculture companies.

I’ve done my homework, don’t worry, it just didn’t line up to sea salt killed plants which I saw in this thread and started our convo. Not really looking for links to articles or to have this be “solved” by anyone, I got a good thing going; however if you’ve had good experience with things like oyster shells and can tell me how they impact your soils pH and stuff like that, interested to know.

We all like to solve, but this is more of a discuss.
 
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