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InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
... Holy big ass thread... No going back on this one, LOL I will just join in EXTREMELY LATE... Eh hmmmm ... Hope you are well Shed... Green days to all
Hey Madd! No going back indeed. Just take a look at the family portrait here and you're as caught up as you need to be :). There's no late here, so :welcome: any time!
If I understand THIS correctly, it's not that the mycorrhizae die off, it's that the plant regulates the interaction between it and them in high phosphate environments, natural or otherwise. Seems it would be another reason not to overfeed P.
Preach that low P farside! Thanks for the link and the info.

For anyone wanting the info in the link without clicking it, it says:
  • Phosphates, both available and unavailable forms, do not kill mycorrhizal fungi.
  • High levels of available soil phosphate (soluble phosphates) result in reduced root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi.
  • Insoluble phosphate does not affect mycorrhizal development. The insoluble phosphate in natural soils can represent as much as 99% of the soil’s total phosphate content.
 

farside05

Plant of the Month: Dec 2018, June 2019
Preach that low P farside! Thanks for the link and the info.

For anyone wanting the info in the link without clicking it, it says:
  • Phosphates, both available and unavailable forms, do not kill mycorrhizal fungi.
  • High levels of available soil phosphate (soluble phosphates) result in reduced root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi.
  • Insoluble phosphate does not affect mycorrhizal development. The insoluble phosphate in natural soils can represent as much as 99% of the soil’s total phosphate content.
The interesting point to me was that mycorrhizae increases phosphate uptake, and then the plant limits mycorrhizal interaction in high phosphate environments. So if i "get it" the plant really uses mycos to regulate it's P uptake. In low P environments it allows more myco interaction to assist in it's P uptake, and conversely in high P environments.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
What's up with all the Candida all the sudden... :hmmmm: Must be something in the water.. Gonna have to do some reading I guess Damn it... LMAO
Depends on what you're using cannabis for really. More and more are finding that the anti-anxiety effects of CBD are quite helpful, along with the anti-inflammatory effect (taken internally, over time rather than instant), and the brain health benefits. Not to mention its role in seizure control among epileptics, and the list goes on. Once they start doing more research on it, they will discover many many more ways that CBD does a body good. And Candida is practically pure CBD. My EVOO oil tested out at 10.5mg/ml with less than 0.5mg/ml THC.

The interesting point to me was that mycorrhizae increases phosphate uptake, and then the plant limits mycorrhizal interaction in high phosphate environments. So if i "get it" the plant really uses mycos to regulate it's P uptake. In low P environments it allows more myco interaction to assist in it's P uptake, and conversely in high P environments.
Hmm...that's not how I read it. But you probably read it more carefully than I did! I read it as the plant only can use mykos in environments with low soluble phosphates. And that mkos will convert insoluble phosphates to soluble and make it available to the roots. "But when soluble phosphates are abundant, the host plants tend to increase their restrictions to mycorrhizal fungi, resulting in lower levels of root colonization. So avoid applying high levels of soluble phosphates at the same time that you apply mycorrhizal fungi. Instead, consider reducing your total phosphate fertility, and spread your phosphate applications out more broadly. "
 
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Graytail

Plant of the Year: 2014 - Plant of the Month: Dec 2014 - Nug of the Month: Feb 2015, Mar & Aug 2016, Dec 2017, Aug 2018, Jan 2019 - Nug of the Year: 2017 - Photo of the Month: June 2018
And root colonization isn't very important in late bloom, which is probably why it's recommended to push it at that stage.

That's useful info for HB, too ... a lotta P in our cation drench ...
 

Agemon

Creme de la Creme Photos of the Year: 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Aug, Sept, Oct & Nov 2017 - Photo of the Month: May 2018, Mar 2019

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
And root colonization isn't very important in late bloom, which is probably why it's recommended to push it at that stage.
That's useful info for HB, too ... a lotta P in our cation drench ...
Based on the bud analysis charts in my noflushclub link #1, there is a heck of a lot more nitrogen and potassium in the buds at harvest than phosphorus. Here's an example of one plant:
nutrient percentages at harvest.JPG
nutrient percentages at harvest key.JPG


Tid Bits all over the floor in the shed... What a mess!
That's the breakfast bar. The shed floor is plywood :).
Time to clean up and start the weekend.
It's always tidy in my garden!
 

farside05

Plant of the Month: Dec 2018, June 2019
Hmm...that's not how I read it. But you probably read it more carefully than I did! I read it as the plant only can use mykos in environments with low soluble phosphates. And that mkos will convert insoluble phosphates to soluble and make it available to the roots. "But when soluble phosphates are abundant, the host plants tend to increase their restrictions to mycorrhizal fungi, resulting in lower levels of root colonization. So avoid applying high levels of soluble phosphates at the same time that you apply mycorrhizal fungi. Instead, consider reducing your total phosphate fertility, and spread your phosphate applications out more broadly. "
I was referring to the first paragraph;

One of the most well-documented benefits from mycorrhizal fungi is the increase in the uptake of phosphates by the host plant. Mycorrhizal fungi increase the amounts of phosphate appearing in host plant tissue, and radio tracer studies have confirmed that this phosphate is being provided via the mycorrhizal fungi.

I don't know, maybe I'm reading too much into it, but if in low or moderate levels of P, mycos increase the levels of P uptake. If at high levels of P, the plant restricts it's interactions with the mycos and therefore decreases the amount of P that can be uptaken. Could it not be said that the plant uses it's relationship with mycos to help regulate it's P intake?
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018

farside05

Plant of the Month: Dec 2018, June 2019
I read that as mykos has the ability to turn insoluble to soluble phosphate, allowing the plant to uptake it. But that's just my reading and I have no real idea!
I think we both concur that they don't care for high P. That looks pretty well spelled out.
 
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