Liberty Haze Bug damage? Can anyone please help identify?? **PICS**

Thread starter #1
OK, so I got two plants in on 2x4x8 grow tent w/ 600w leds. Liberty Haze and Pineapple Chunk.

Pineapple chunk had an issue with fungus gnats, but I remedied that with mosquito bits and haven't had a problem since. I dosed both plants with the mosquito bits at the same time, just to ensure Liberty Haze wouldn't be affected.

I just started noticing, maybe last week, this little section on the LH and I'm assuming it's some sort of insect damage, yet I've not seen any around Liberty, but it's just this one area. I'm not sure how to resolve this, as I can't figure out what the problem is. Both plants have been getting Sierra Natural Sciences 209a systemic pest control since seedlings and they're going on 4 weeks from sprout.

Both plants were planted from seed directly into substrate, using Fox Farm Ocean Forest and the whole Foxfarm nutrient line, using a little less than the feeding schedule.

As I said, I believe this to be bug damage and would greatly appreciate any insight, but if you think this may be something else, please let me know!

If you require any further info, please let me know, I'm more than happy to give as much info as is necessary.


 
Dude, your plant looks like is because of the lack of calcium and sick. The official rescue measures are recommended:Solution to fixing a Calcium deficiency
To fix a calcium deficiency you can treat by foliar feeding with one teaspoon of dolomite lime or Garden lime per quart of water, Or Any Chemical/Organic nutrients that have Calcium in them will fix a Calcium deficiency. (Only mixing at ½ strength when using chemical nutrients or it will cause nutrient burn!)
Or you can take crushed up dolomite lime or garden lime in a gallon of water and water it in the soil. 1 to 2 teaspoons per gallon of water, which will be slow acting. Garden Gypsum, which is medium absorption. Limestone, which is medium absorption, Rock Phosphate and Animal wastes which are both medium/slow absorption. Note: Caution when using gypsum to an already acid soil (pH that is less than 5.5) can have a very bad effect on different types of plants by effecting the absorption of soil aluminum, which is poison to plant roots.

Now if you added to much chemical nutrients and or organics, (which is hard to burn your plants when using organics) you need to flush the soil with plain water. You need to use 2 times as much water as the size of the pot, for example: If you have a 5 gallon pot and need to flush it, you need to use 10 gallons of water to rinse out the soil good enough to get rid of excessive nutrients.


Maybe you can use milk to water it, but I didn't graduate from the University, so I don't know if the milk calcium can not be absorbed by the plants you. But I have seen the peasants use milk to irrigate the watermelon, so I think you can try!
 
Thread starter #3
Dude, your plant looks like is because of the lack of calcium and sick. The official rescue measures are recommended:Solution to fixing a Calcium deficiency
To fix a calcium deficiency you can treat by foliar feeding with one teaspoon of dolomite lime or Garden lime per quart of water, Or Any Chemical/Organic nutrients that have Calcium in them will fix a Calcium deficiency. (Only mixing at ½ strength when using chemical nutrients or it will cause nutrient burn!)
Or you can take crushed up dolomite lime or garden lime in a gallon of water and water it in the soil. 1 to 2 teaspoons per gallon of water, which will be slow acting. Garden Gypsum, which is medium absorption. Limestone, which is medium absorption, Rock Phosphate and Animal wastes which are both medium/slow absorption. Note: Caution when using gypsum to an already acid soil (pH that is less than 5.5) can have a very bad effect on different types of plants by effecting the absorption of soil aluminum, which is poison to plant roots.

Now if you added to much chemical nutrients and or organics, (which is hard to burn your plants when using organics) you need to flush the soil with plain water. You need to use 2 times as much water as the size of the pot, for example: If you have a 5 gallon pot and need to flush it, you need to use 10 gallons of water to rinse out the soil good enough to get rid of excessive nutrients.


Maybe you can use milk to water it, but I didn't graduate from the University, so I don't know if the milk calcium can not be absorbed by the plants you. But I have seen the peasants use milk to irrigate the watermelon, so I think you can try!
Ok, thanks for the input! I have some cal-mag solution, so I'll use that. I dosed both plants with 5ml once since sprout, but I'll add it back into the regimen.
 
Ok, thanks for the input! I have some cal-mag solution, so I'll use that. I dosed both plants with 5ml once since sprout, but I'll add it back into the regimen.
Curious to know if the Calcium fixed the problem? By your photos, I seem to have the same issues with the leaves and growing tips on my outdoors. I was thinking bugs, but not sure now!
 
Curious to know if the Calcium fixed the problem? By your photos, I seem to have the same issues with the leaves and growing tips on my outdoors. I was thinking bugs, but not sure now!
He hasn't posted since he started this thread. I'll bet adiwangs advice resolved his issue. There is a good deficiency chart around here somewhere or you can take some pictures and start a new thread. It's always better with pictures.... Solo