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Long time lurker turned poster looking for help

Hello everybody. This site has a wealth of information that I've read over and over again and I can't seem to find out what is wrong with my plants could you please help me please?

Soil Mixture: Ace all purpose soil .07-.01.-.03 , Mushroom compost, Dr. Earth Kelp meal 1-.5-2, Azomite Volcanic Ash 0-0-.2, Jobe's Organic Bone Meal 2-14-0 and Jobe's Organic All Purpose Fertilizer 4-4-4.

Temp: 70 to 80 (21 to 27)degrees

Rh: 50 to 65

Water: Plain ph'd tap water
IMG_20191111_214306_3.jpg

IMG_20191111_214400_8.jpg


The first picture is of Grower's Choice Northern Light auto and the second is GC Sour Kush. These plants are 23 days old from first light. Is there anything else you need to know? Also these aren't the first time I bought autos from GC and they stopped growing, is it common?.
 

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Commando45

Well-Known Member
Hello everybody. This site has a wealth of information that I've read over and over again and I can't seem to find out what is wrong with my plants could you please help me please?

Soil Mixture: Ace all purpose soil .07-.01.-.03 , Mushroom compost, Dr. Earth Kelp meal 1-.5-2, Azomite Volcanic Ash 0-0-.2, Jobe's Organic Bone Meal 2-14-0 and Jobe's Organic All Purpose Fertilizer 4-4-4.

Temp: 70 to 80 (21 to 27)degrees

Rh: 50 to 65

Water: Plain ph'd tap water
IMG_20191111_214306_3.jpg

IMG_20191111_214400_8.jpg


The first picture is of Grower's Choice Northern Light auto and the second is GC Sour Kush. These plants are 23 days old from first light. Is there anything else you need to know? Also these aren't the first time I bought autos from GC and they stopped growing, is it common?.
Looks like watering...lack off ....?
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020
I have just started some seedlings in about the hottest soil I can imagine, right out of my compost bin... Seeds in this environment either burn up right away or the plant does come to the surface, and if it makes it to the light, the plants usually thrive. I do not believe this is from soil that is too hot.
This looks like a classic case of watering too often, and never letting the soil dry out down to the very bottom. Since the lower roots have been underwater for so long, they have shut down, waiting for the flood waters to go away... the result is what you see... a plant beginning to starve to death.
Use the lift the pot method to determine the correct time to water. This will save this plant.
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019, Sept 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Nov 2019 - Plant of the Month: April 2020
Welcome Destined. Since they are autos they may have already started flowering and that will leave you with very small plants if they survive. An auto needs to grow as much as it can in the beginning. The little dot in the center of the left one looks like flower to me. I'd give it another try if you can. After reading the watering page, do you think that might be the issue?
 
Dusted and Hugepeckerhead thank you for the referral and Emilya thanks for the detailed info. Being a newb I'm not sure if it is the amount of water. I've been watering every 2 or 3 days now with 250ml of water per plant(3 gallon pot) and yes I was using the knuckle method. Is 250ml too much?

Stoneotter if they're flowering now I won't get a gram off them, so I hope they haven't flowered. I'm hoping they'll follow this path Life cycle of autoflowering cannabis
 
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Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020
Here is what happens when you decide for the container how much to give and if you are watering via the knuckle method. When the top dries out, there is still water sitting in the bottom of the container. If you come along and give your measured amount of water, it simply flows through and joins the rest of the water at the bottom. Many people water to runoff every time, and that wouldn't be too far from where you are coming in with 250ml, because whatever you are adding simply gets added to the water pool of stagnant water sitting in the bottom. Since that pool is being replenished regularly, it never goes away and the roots at the bottom continue to be held underwater, not able to get oxygen.

The correct way to do this is to not use your knuckle and to wait to water until the water table has dropped all the way down to the bottom. The best way to tell that this has happened is to use the lift method, or actually check the moisture with that very handy knuckle, from the bottom holes instead of the top, although this is very disruptive to those poor lower roots. Then when you water... stop making the decision for the plant how much it would like, and slowly and carefully like filling up a sponge, see how much water you can get that soil to hold. Saturate it.... you are creating a column of pH adjusted water in that container. Let the roots and how much they can immediately uptake and how much your soil will hold, determine how much water that will be... not you. Then, sit on your hands and wait until that container is drained again all the way to the bottom before you saturate that soil again.

In this case, the lower roots are so damaged that the plant can't drain the water in a reasonable amount of time, so don't go more than about 3 days without giving just a little bit of water or water/nutes to water the top set of roots... your goal is to give just enough to water 4" deep, but no more. You do not want any extra water to fall down and add to the water table. 250ml is too much for your small container, and I would suggest about 1/4 of that for this partial watering. After a couple of partial waterings, the lower roots should start to catch up and soon the entire container will be on a 2-3 day wet/dry cycle and you will be able to water normally again.
____________________________________________

The Proper Way to Water a Potted Plant (in soil) - STICKY
Emmie's Links, Journals and Tutorials

Berry-D'licious No AACT Organic - Grow Journal
Pineapple Chunk Mega Crop Test - Grow Journal
 

HugePeckerhead

Well-Known Member
Here is what happens when you decide for the container how much to give and if you are watering via the knuckle method. When the top dries out, there is still water sitting in the bottom of the container. If you come along and give your measured amount of water, it simply flows through and joins the rest of the water at the bottom. Many people water to runoff every time, and that wouldn't be too far from where you are coming in with 250ml, because whatever you are adding simply gets added to the water pool of stagnant water sitting in the bottom. Since that pool is being replenished regularly, it never goes away and the roots at the bottom continue to be held underwater, not able to get oxygen.

The correct way to do this is to not use your knuckle and to wait to water until the water table has dropped all the way down to the bottom. The best way to tell that this has happened is to use the lift method, or actually check the moisture with that very handy knuckle, from the bottom holes instead of the top, although this is very disruptive to those poor lower roots. Then when you water... stop making the decision for the plant how much it would like, and slowly and carefully like filling up a sponge, see how much water you can get that soil to hold. Saturate it.... you are creating a column of pH adjusted water in that container. Let the roots and how much they can immediately uptake and how much your soil will hold, determine how much water that will be... not you. Then, sit on your hands and wait until that container is drained again all the way to the bottom before you saturate that soil again.

In this case, the lower roots are so damaged that the plant can't drain the water in a reasonable amount of time, so don't go more than about 3 days without giving just a little bit of water or water/nutes to water the top set of roots... your goal is to give just enough to water 4" deep, but no more. You do not want any extra water to fall down and add to the water table. 250ml is too much for your small container, and I would suggest about 1/4 of that for this partial watering. After a couple of partial waterings, the lower roots should start to catch up and soon the entire container will be on a 2-3 day wet/dry cycle and you will be able to water normally again.
____________________________________________

The Proper Way to Water a Potted Plant (in soil) - STICKY
Emmie's Links, Journals and Tutorials

Berry-D'licious No AACT Organic - Grow Journal
Pineapple Chunk Mega Crop Test - Grow Journal
is it healthy to just wait til they wilt slightly then water or would there be a minor delay in the plant replenishing itself?
 

stoneotter

Member of the Month: July 2019, Sept 2020 - Grow Journal of the Month: Nov 2019 - Plant of the Month: April 2020
The method Emilya ia talking about doesn't hurt but rather enhances the plant. In veg they really do love the method and it creates "the wet dry cycle" they crave. Oxygen is a must in the soil for them and constant water doesn't allow for it.
By the time they get ready for flowering they will have you on a schedule and won't need or want to be left to wilt any more. Just give it to them, and let them use it up. Repeat.
I use this method.
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020
is it healthy to just wait til they wilt slightly then water or would there be a minor delay in the plant replenishing itself?
yes, but only if you are able to correctly determine the difference between actual wilt, and the droop that happens in response to daily cycles, and, and this is a biggie, if the plant is not already experiencing wilt or droop due to other factors, such as overwatering.
This actually is how I water... I can tell by the angle of the leaves at various points on the plant if we are nearing the end of the watering cycle... but I would not expect a new grower of weeds to be able to make this determination.
 

Commando45

Well-Known Member
Here is what happens when you decide for the container how much to give and if you are watering via the knuckle method. When the top dries out, there is still water sitting in the bottom of the container. If you come along and give your measured amount of water, it simply flows through and joins the rest of the water at the bottom. Many people water to runoff every time, and that wouldn't be too far from where you are coming in with 250ml, because whatever you are adding simply gets added to the water pool of stagnant water sitting in the bottom. Since that pool is being replenished regularly, it never goes away and the roots at the bottom continue to be held underwater, not able to get oxygen.

The correct way to do this is to not use your knuckle and to wait to water until the water table has dropped all the way down to the bottom. The best way to tell that this has happened is to use the lift method, or actually check the moisture with that very handy knuckle, from the bottom holes instead of the top, although this is very disruptive to those poor lower roots. Then when you water... stop making the decision for the plant how much it would like, and slowly and carefully like filling up a sponge, see how much water you can get that soil to hold. Saturate it.... you are creating a column of pH adjusted water in that container. Let the roots and how much they can immediately uptake and how much your soil will hold, determine how much water that will be... not you. Then, sit on your hands and wait until that container is drained again all the way to the bottom before you saturate that soil again.

In this case, the lower roots are so damaged that the plant can't drain the water in a reasonable amount of time, so don't go more than about 3 days without giving just a little bit of water or water/nutes to water the top set of roots... your goal is to give just enough to water 4" deep, but no more. You do not want any extra water to fall down and add to the water table. 250ml is too much for your small container, and I would suggest about 1/4 of that for this partial watering. After a couple of partial waterings, the lower roots should start to catch up and soon the entire container will be on a 2-3 day wet/dry cycle and you will be able to water normally again.
____________________________________________

The Proper Way to Water a Potted Plant (in soil) - STICKY
Emmie's Links, Journals and Tutorials

Berry-D'licious No AACT Organic - Grow Journal
Pineapple Chunk Mega Crop Test - Grow Journal
Hi @Emilya , this is my 1st run using airpots...quick question..., i tend too be watering more often, is this the norm with them?...they're drying out alot quicker, its soil i use...
 

Emilya

Member of the Month: Mar 2019 - Grow Journal of the Month: Jan 2020
They do dry out a little quicker than a hard sided container, but how are you determining that they are actually dried out? Remember, it is the plant using the water... very little comparatively goes out via evaporation.
 

Commando45

Well-Known Member
They do dry out a little quicker than a hard sided container, but how are you determining that they are actually dried out? Remember, it is the plant using the water... very little comparatively goes out via evaporation.
I was thinking that..., Knuckle and lifting method ive always used..in veg i let them dry right out water too run off every two days...( feed every 7 days) im definately finding im watering more...do you think i should stick too feed every 7days although the plants are using more water inbetween feedings...and thank you @Emilya , your input and time is very much appreciated.
 

NOOOBIENOT

Well-Known Member
With out pics its hard to say , but i do know that trying to come up with a routine is the wrong way to go , if the plant is healthy and green keep doing what you are doing , if its yellowing then you need a change of what you are doing , the secret is learn what the plant is telling you , what works today wont be the same when it goes to flower , or when you change to a different strain , not every human speaks English the trick is to learn to translate what they are saying . plants are no different only a different language , this is where experience comes in and getting good solid advice from good solid growers can help but you will slowly learn plant language with more grows under your belt , believe me i have killed many of plants in my early years and to this day i still seek advice , the fun is in the learning not expecting huge crops on your 1st and 2nd grows as you are only setting yourself up for disappointment .in this case and many others knowledge is most powerful
 
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