MadMike's Organic Medical Outdoor Grow

MadMike

New Member
Generally looking great! Nice photography as well. As the plant is beginning to send its energy into producing sex cells, or pistils, it will undergo "apoptosis" which is cell programmed death, meaning, it is thermodynamically efficient for the plant to stop utilizing glucose at the lower portions of the plant. Naturally as it matures, the fan leaves toward the bottom will start dying off. This is most likely the case here since the canopy is still relatively lush (IMHO).:420:

~RL

Thanks Lee. You know the previous post with the leaf sample pics? The second example are leaves taken from near the top of the plant :6:
 

MadMike

New Member
Thanks for the input Lee, Heir, and JASPL. I actually have a lot of clay in the soil here which is why I am careful not to over water. The Tiger Bloom I'm planning on doing full strength every other watering, which would be once a week, and I've added Epsom salts but only with my last watering @ 1 tsp per gallon with Tiger Bloom. Should the Epsom salt be added every time I water or every feeding? Would a Cal-Mag liquid supplement be better than Epsom salt? Some have even recommended Dolomite Lime. I don't want to shock the plants or burn them.
 

Lester Freeman

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the input Lee, Heir, and JASPL. I actually have a lot of clay in the soil here which is why I am careful not to over water. The Tiger Bloom I'm planning on doing full strength every other watering, which would be once a week, and I've added Epsom salts but only with my last watering @ 1 tsp per gallon with Tiger Bloom. Should the Epsom salt be added every time I water or every feeding? Would a Cal-Mag liquid supplement be better than Epsom salt? Some have even recommended Dolomite Lime. I don't want to shock the plants or burn them.

TigerBloom is a source of magnesium, also if you do add MgSO4 (epsom salts) , you are likely to increase your pH, so be careful if you choose to add that. Although, I grew awesome bud in a pH of 8. So might not be a bad idea if you can actually pinpoint the magnesium deficiency.

Sometimes less is more.:420:

RL~
 

MadMike

New Member
TigerBloom is a source of magnesium, also if you do add MgSO4 (epsom salts) , you are likely to increase your pH, so be careful if you choose to add that. Although, I grew awesome bud in a pH of 8. So might not be a bad idea if you can actually pinpoint the magnesium deficiency.

Sometimes less is more.:420:

RL~

Right on, Lee. I've only used Epsom salt once with the last watering. I water again in two days, so I'll check the PH again before feeding. I never had to go through this science with heirloom tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, and green beans.
:)
 

Lester Freeman

Well-Known Member
Right on, Lee. I've only used Epsom salt once with the last watering. I water again in two days, so I'll check the PH again before feeding. I never had to go through this science with heirloom tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, and green beans.
:)

Yes, thats true, but theoretically the same techniques apply! :3:
 

Jimmycricket

Nug of the Month: Feb 2014
I cant speak on that iron tone stuff and tbh yellowing or dry brown leaves is just semi natural when its just a few leaves here n there.

But I will say espoma although its fairly inexpensive, is a TOP NOTCH company. If you look at their ingredients they are the good shit for organic gardening.

I use some 5-3-3 Espoma dry ferts that i mix in my soil and sometimes top dress with for veg and to last until first couple weeks of flower. I love the stuff and after I ran out of my original 4 pound bag I found an 8 pound bag of it for just 11 bucks at Homie Ds!

As for a quarter cup of jamaican bat guano per big plant. They could take way more. My plants are much smaller then yours as I started them much later. However I have gave each like 1 cup total over the past few weeks.
 

Jimmycricket

Nug of the Month: Feb 2014
magnesium sulfate is entirely inorganic, how does this contribute to a "complete organic grow"

You are wrong. Sul Po Mag is a rock that is mechanically mined. Just like azomite, rock phosphate, greensand and countless other rocks/ minerals. It is in every sense of the word organic.
 

Lester Freeman

Well-Known Member
You are wrong. Sul Po Mag is a rock that is mechanically mined. Just like azomite, rock phosphate, greensand and countless other rocks/ minerals. It is in every sense of the word organic.

Rocks, minerals, and gases, are inorganic. Organic compounds are synthesized from them. I'm not sure how magnesium, and phosphorous are organic.
 

MadMike

New Member
I've noticed some nutrients contain Magnesium Nitrate or Magnesium Carbonate. I've never heard of Magnesium Sulfate. Then again, I am very new to the subject of plant nutrients. The only kind I ever used was in the vegetable garden and it was American Pride by Fox Farms. I figured Cannabis is a weed. How sensitive could it possibly be? I'm learning more all the time.
 

Jimmycricket

Nug of the Month: Feb 2014
Mag Sulfate gos by many names. Its basically a rock that has sulfur, magneisium and Potash. I purposely add it to my soil in small amounts.

The thing Lee and myself disagree on isnt if its bad for weed, its if its "organic" or not.

Sul po mag adds 3 very essential elements that cannabis thrives on Mikey, plus it acts as a PH stabilizer.
 

Lester Freeman

Well-Known Member
I've noticed some nutrients contain Magnesium Nitrate or Magnesium Carbonate. I've never heard of Magnesium Sulfate. Then again, I am very new to the subject of plant nutrients. The only kind I ever used was in the vegetable garden and it was American Pride by Fox Farms. I figured Cannabis is a weed. How sensitive could it possibly be? I'm learning more all the time.

Nitrate, carbonate, sulfate, all different ways to dissolve magnesium into an inorganic compound, which can then be dissolved in water for Mg dispersal, Jimmy brings up a good point, that adding Epsom salts will create a buffer solution (makes it hard for pH to go up/down very quickly), so it couldn't really hurt unless you over-dosed her on magnesium, especially if its hard to pinpoint whether she needs it or not. FoxFarm is good stuff, read the label on your American Pride bottle, see what compounds are in it. But that TigerBloom is good man! Either way, I don't think your plants have any serious diseases, since they look like very healthy, and large organisms.
 

MadMike

New Member
I checked the soil PH of a few yesterday and they were between 6.5-7 with a test kit. The Tiger Bloom and a bit of Bat guano seems to be doing the trick since much of the yellowing has gone away. The flowers are developing nicely. Five females out of seven wasn't bad. The other day I stopped by a nursery and noticed the Sol Po Mag was listed as natural on the line of E.B. Stone supplements. They have an Organic line and a Natural line of supplements.

I came across this:
“Organic” & “Natural:” As it relates to fertilizers, soil amendments and other products for the garden, “organic” means that its origins are from animal and/or plant material (bone meal or hemlock bark, for example), which contain carbon. Rock phosphate, however, though “natural,” does not fall under this definition and so technically cannot be called organic. But as a working definition the term “organic gardening” has evolved to mean using organic and naturally-derived products, as opposed to synthetics -- those that are artificially or chemically-created in a laboratory.
 

Lester Freeman

Well-Known Member
Nice Mike, that sounds good. 5/7 is pretty wicked too. If possible try to show some of the developing buds in your next update. :3:
Also, I agree with your citation as well. It's a semantics issue. Growing outdoors can be tough, especially with the diverse amount of insect life that are always looking for a new castle to establish!

Best of luck with the blooms, looking forward to your next update!

RL~
 

MadMike

New Member
I believe synthetics should be avoided when it comes to anything we ingest. I've never used synthetics with vegetables or fruits, so I certainly wouldn't with anything else. The only real bug problem I've dealt with this year were sow bugs eating my melons. I've never heard of them attacking Cannabis. Do you ever use a preventative program or do you wait for the evidence of insects? I'll try to get some more pics soon.
 

Jimmycricket

Nug of the Month: Feb 2014
Hi ya Mikey. I too am trying to stick to 100% natural. All the plants in my garden get the organic shit.

So far my weed is fairly unscathed. I noticed a nibble off a leaf today, but honestly Im not gonna flip if one grasshopper eats 2 bites from a leaf. I did notice a few days ago a big fucking grasshopper living in my best plant (he has good taste lol). So I tryed to grab him to go release the lil fella down the road away from my place. But the bastard kept jumping everywhere so I killed him.

Besides a grasshopper and some ants that like to eat the tomatos (lil bastards) and some orange aphids that killed my indoor hydroponic oleander experiment, everythings been pretty mellow. I got some neem on hand to deal with mold, mildew or bugs. But imho if your plants are really healthy they act as their own insect defense.
 
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