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Magnus8's Canna Cream, Body Butter & Canna Lotion Study Hall

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
I've been giving Dave Groomer's pain cream to a few friends. One in particular shared with me that after using the cream regularly for the past two months he and his wife have noticed an appreciable uptick in his sense of wellbeing.

An unexpected benefit of a cream I'd initially given him for pain, but had encouraged it be used for lubricating dry skin and all those little "ouch" moments life surprises you with as you grow older. He'd started using it proactively instead of reactively, and that was when he noticed the mood change as well as appreciably reduced pain moments.

I informed him of a recent bit of information I'd picked up in a Green Flower Media class that we have a pad of skin where the spine meets the neck - which is part of the spine - that covers unmyelated axions, the tail ends of brain cells. Because they're unmyelated you can apply topicals to this area and it becomes a direct pathway to the brain.

I immediately started applying my own topical to this pad, as has everyone I've shared this information with. It's a pathway I simply can't pass up. :laugh2:

Also, while listening to a video of the 2015 Seattle Hempfest panel on cannabis innovations Ah Warner of Cannabis Basics, a major topicals concern, shared that B-Caryophyllene and linalool will help topicals absorb through the skin and will improve the efficacy of topicals, creating a transdermal effect. In her opinion you don't need things like DMSO when a terpene will do the job naturally.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
I informed him of a recent bit of information I'd picked up in a Green Flower Media class that we have a pad of skin where the spine meets the neck - which is part of the spine - that covers unmyelated axions, the tail ends of brain cells. Because they're unmyelated you can apply topicals to this area and it becomes a direct pathway to the brain.

I immediately started applying my own topical to this pad, as has everyone I've shared this information with. It's a pathway I simply can't pass up.
I noticed the same thing in that video and thought it was fascinating! This past Friday I recommended applying the oil to that location to a woman in my office with migraines. I'm awaiting her results.
 

ginganinja30

Well-Known Member
I noticed the same thing in that video and thought it was fascinating! This past Friday I recommended applying the oil to that location to a woman in my office with migraines. I'm awaiting her results.
It definitely works very quickly for my migraines ITS [emoji2].

I am completely out of cannabis supply at the moment except for a small amount of infused grape seed oil with peppermint and tea tree essential oils.

This means that my symptoms of seizures, migraines, chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment and the rest are back kicking my ass.

I applied my oil to to this location on the spine and got relief in minutes. A really valuable site for application folks
[emoji2][emoji271][emoji1308]
 

mangpogi

New Member
I informed him of a recent bit of information I'd picked up in a Green Flower Media class that we have a pad of skin where the spine meets the neck - which is part of the spine - that covers unmyelated axions, the tail ends of brain cells. Because they're unmyelated you can apply topicals to this area and it becomes a direct pathway to the brain.
Wow, first time I tried this and just a tiny bit of cannabis lotion on this area gave me very noticeable head and body buzz. Good for getting relaxed and ready for the sack. Thanks!
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
It definitely works very quickly for my migraines ITS [emoji2].
I am completely out of cannabis supply at the moment except for a small amount of infused grape seed oil with peppermint and tea tree essential oils.
This means that my symptoms of seizures, migraines, chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment and the rest are back kicking my ass.
I applied my oil to to this location on the spine and got relief in minutes. A really valuable site for application folks
[emoji2][emoji271][emoji1308]
That's great info Ninja! I'll make sure to pass it along.
 

Baya

Active Member
Hello, :ciao:


I can’t remember if this has already been asked and answered…

Was wondering about the sole extraction step, in the making of this topical.

If instead of resorting to decarbed plant material, one uses CCO, how long does the extraction process with the carrier oil (in a double boiler say) is supposed to last, if at all ?

Or (and this is where I don’t know whether my reasoning is correct :hmmmm:) since CCO is in essence, an already highly concentrated extraction, does it have to undergo a several hour long double boiler extraction in order to bond with the carrier oil ?
Or does it simply need to be gently heated, in order to melt it, with the carrier oil (again in a double boiler), and just thoroughly stirred until the two become homogeneously blended ?


If anything seems confused and/or not clear enough, just let me know, I’ll try to rephrase it in another way.

Thanks for your help. :thanks:
 

FeloniousPunk

Well-Known Member
Hi All,

I know this is off topic but I didn't know where to ask.

I have leftover stems and stalks from last summer's grow. They had found their way into a big rubbermaid container and been forgotten. Found them the other day and moved them into a pail to dispose of them.

After handling them, I found the cannabis aroma left on my hands was pleasant and very strong. I am wondering if there is a use for this material. Potpourri, incense and scented candles spring to mind. Anybody tried harnessing this great scent?

Peace. :peace:
 
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InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Again, Hi, I did not find the way to edit my previous post regarding vegetable oils. Anyway... I've found the chart bellow and reckoned it might be worth sharing with the community.
Excellent chart, thanks! I've saved it for reference :thanks:

Hi All, I know this is off topic but I didn't know where to ask. I have leftover stems and stalks from last summer's grow. They had found their way into a big rubbermaid container and been forgotten. Found them the other day and moved them into a pail to dispose of them.
After handling them, I found the cannabis aroma left on my hands was pleasant and very strong. I am wondering if there is a use for this material. Potpourri, incense and scented candles spring to mind. Anybody tried harnessing this great scent?
Peace. :peace:
I did the same thing with my first grow, saving every bit of plant. I can tell you that making oil from it wasn't worth my time or money as there didn't seem to be any healing power in it. For smell alone you could grind some and put it in an empty metal tea-light container. Put it over a candle and see if the aroma fills the room. Heating without burning would be the idea.

I haven't tried it, it just came to mind.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
Hello, :ciao:
I can’t remember if this has already been asked and answered…
Was wondering about the sole extraction step, in the making of this topical.
If instead of resorting to decarbed plant material, one uses CCO, how long does the extraction process with the carrier oil (in a double boiler say) is supposed to last, if at all ?
Or (and this is where I don’t know whether my reasoning is correct :hmmmm:) since CCO is in essence, an already highly concentrated extraction, does it have to undergo a several hour long double boiler extraction in order to bond with the carrier oil ?
Or does it simply need to be gently heated, in order to melt it, with the carrier oil (again in a double boiler), and just thoroughly stirred until the two become homogeneously blended ?
If anything seems confused and/or not clear enough, just let me know, I’ll try to rephrase it in another way.
Thanks for your help. :thanks:
That might be a better question for the Oil Study Hall thread as we don't deal in CCO here (because making it is a whole lot of trouble compared to making topicals!). But I would think that blending the oils wouldn't be the long process that infusing is. I'm thinking that once both oils are liquid and blended it would be good to go. Still, seems like a waste of labor intensive CCO. :Namaste:
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
It definitely works very quickly for my migraines ITS. I applied my oil to to this location on the spine and got relief in minutes. A really valuable site for application folks
I'm back to give testimony!! I managed to stave off a migraine all weekend without any meds with regular application of my topical to the top of my spine/base of my neck area, as well as on the muscles in the back of my neck up into my hairline. I rolled it on and rubbed it in every 2-4 hours from Friday afternoon through Saturday night, and while I felt like I had a stiff neck some of the time, I never got the pain that comes when I don't take the meds early.

And, the woman in my office got relief from her migraine, though she didn't use it early enough to prevent her from having to take her meds. I told her she needs to apply it as soon as she gets the hint of something happening. A doctor told me years ago, "Never chase a headache." Meaning get on top of it quickly with whatever you're going to be using to knock it down.

One last thing to add...this current batch was just pumpkin seed and grape seed oil. It is absorbed so fast that there is no time to spread it around before you massage it in. It still works and is definitely not oily, but if you're looking for something you can spread over an area and then massage in, add some fractionated coconut oil to the mix.

Thanks to all the great contributors here and to Magnus for getting the ball rolling with amazing information! :thanks:
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
I'm back to give testimony!! I managed to stave off a migraine all weekend without any meds with regular application of my topical to the top of my spine/base of my neck area, as well as on the muscles in the back of my neck up into my hairline. I rolled it on and rubbed it in every 2-4 hours from Friday afternoon through Saturday night, and while I felt like I had a stiff neck some of the time, I never got the pain that comes when I don't take the meds early.

And, the woman in my office got relief from her migraine, though she didn't use it early enough to prevent her from having to take her meds. I told her she needs to apply it as soon as she gets the hint of something happening. A doctor told me years ago, "Never chase a headache." Meaning get on top of it quickly with whatever you're going to be using to knock it down.

One last thing to add...this current batch was just pumpkin seed and grape seed oil. It is absorbed so fast that there is no time to spread it around before you massage it in. It still works and is definitely not oily, but if you're looking for something you can spread over an area and then massage in, add some fractionated coconut oil to the mix.

Thanks to all the great contributors here and to Magnus for getting the ball rolling with amazing information! :thanks:
This is wonderful news! :yahoo: I've been getting fabulous reports about this from all over. We need a name for that pad of skin. Any ideas? :laugh2: I went looking through some anatomy books, but got distracted.
 

InTheShed

Member of the Year: 2018 - Member of the Month: Jan 2018, Nov 2018 - Grow Journal of the Month: Aug 2018 - Plant of the Month: Oct 2018
This is wonderful news! :yahoo: I've been getting fabulous reports about this from all over. We need a name for that pad of skin. Any ideas? :laugh2: I went looking through some anatomy books, but got distracted.
The searches I do for this place! Closest thing I could find with absolutely no medical training whatsoever (I think I had to mention that before in the Oil thread!):

"The ventral ramus of the spinal nerve contains about twice as many axons and a lower proportion of unmyelinated fibers in comparison with the dorsal ramus..." which means the dorsal ramus has a higher proportion of unmyelinated fibers. Source

Dorsal rami of the cervical nerves (ignore the red box, we're focusing on the back of the neck):



Shall we just call it the Medial Dorsal Rami and call it a day?
 

keshazel

Well-Known Member
I've been giving Dave Groomer's pain cream to a few friends. One in particular shared with me that after using the cream regularly for the past two months he and his wife have noticed an appreciable uptick in his sense of wellbeing.

An unexpected benefit of a cream I'd initially given him for pain, but had encouraged it be used for lubricating dry skin and all those little "ouch" moments life surprises you with as you grow older. He'd started using it proactively instead of reactively, and that was when he noticed the mood change as well as appreciably reduced pain moments.

I informed him of a recent bit of information I'd picked up in a Green Flower Media class that we have a pad of skin where the spine meets the neck - which is part of the spine - that covers unmyelated axions, the tail ends of brain cells. Because they're unmyelated you can apply topicals to this area and it becomes a direct pathway to the brain.

I immediately started applying my own topical to this pad, as has everyone I've shared this information with. It's a pathway I simply can't pass up. :laugh2:

Also, while listening to a video of the 2015 Seattle Hempfest panel on cannabis innovations Ah Warner of Cannabis Basics, a major topicals concern, shared that B-Caryophyllene and linalool will help topicals absorb through the skin and will improve the efficacy of topicals, creating a transdermal effect. In her opinion you don't need things like DMSO when a terpene will do the job naturally.
Hi Sue,

I watched a lot of videos on YouTube about making creme/lotion. I want to use it for a few reasons; but even more so when I see what you said above. I'd love to get started if I knew which chemovars might be most effective for my purposes.

The dispensaries around here are all on line. I can see what bud they are selling any day of the week. There are a number of choices. Maybe some of them would be appropriate.

This could be a great daytime option for me vs. the rosin I take at night which has a high THC content. I'm only taking two tiny pieces per night. I am going very slow.

I hope I've made it to 50.

Regards, Kelly
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
Hi Sue,

I watched a lot of videos on YouTube about making creme/lotion. I want to use it for a few reasons; but even more so when I see what you said above. I'd love to get started if I knew which chemovars might be most effective for my purposes.

The dispensaries around here are all on line. I can see what bud they are selling any day of the week. There are a number of choices. Maybe some of them would be appropriate.

This could be a great daytime option for me vs. the rosin I take at night which has a high THC content. I'm only taking two tiny pieces per night. I am going very slow.

I hope I've made it to 50.

Regards, Kelly
You're three posts away from 50. All things in their right time. :5:

Beta-Caryophyllene shows up very often in chemovars that have purple flowers. Look for color. :laugh2: How amusing. That's the best way to choose your food too, and, come to think of it, we're learning more and more that cannabis is best used as a food.

Guys, I try, but I can't type in "strain" without see Ethan Russo's face, asking us to please try to use the language of botany and not the language prohibition thrust upon us by shoving cannabis underground into a nepharious market. You'll have to live with the fact that to me it's "chemovar," a more apt description of the individual expressions of our beloved plants.

Sorry Kelly, I'll step away from the soapbox. Look for the darkest purples with the highest THC you can find. You'll be using them for topicals, so sedating effects won't come into play. Many purples are also high in Myrcene, which will knock you out for a good night's sleep. Linalool will likely appear in the profiles of a plant expressing b-caryophyllene as well. Lilac is high in linalool. That purple is a clue. Not a reliable one for linalool, but it can point you in the right direction.

A dispensary, on line or not, should have staff that could recommend the chemovars in their inventory that have these terpenes in them. I'd assume they have their product tested, and part of that test should be the terpene profiles.
 

SweetSue

Member of the Year: 2015 & 2016 - Member of the Month: Mar 2015, Sept 2016 - Nug of the Month: Oct 2017 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Dec 2016
The searches I do for this place! Closest thing I could find with absolutely no medical training whatsoever (I think I had to mention that before in the Oil thread!):

"The ventral ramus of the spinal nerve contains about twice as many axons and a lower proportion of unmyelinated fibers in comparison with the dorsal ramus..." which means the dorsal ramus has a higher proportion of unmyelinated fibers. Source

Dorsal rami of the cervical nerves (ignore the red box, we're focusing on the back of the neck):



Shall we just call it the Medial Dorsal Rami and call it a day?
You are a dream. :5::5::5: Medial Dorsal Rami..... It works for me for the moment. Someone's gonna come up with a better name and we'll run with it. :laugh2:

I got chills when I realized the area of the brain this pathway reaches. Look at the access!!! It's a big back door, isn't it? :slide:
 

keshazel

Well-Known Member
You're three posts away from 50. All things in their right time. :5:

Beta-Caryophyllene shows up very often in chemovars that have purple flowers. Look for color. :laugh2: How amusing. That's the best way to choose your food too, and, come to think of it, we're learning more and more that cannabis is best used as a food.

Guys, I try, but I can't type in "strain" without see Ethan Russo's face, asking us to please try to use the language of botany and not the language prohibition thrust upon us by shoving cannabis underground into a nepharious market. You'll have to live with the fact that to me it's "chemovar," a more apt description of the individual expressions of our beloved plants.

Sorry Kelly, I'll step away from the soapbox. Look for the darkest purples with the highest THC you can find. You'll be using them for topicals, so sedating effects won't come into play. Many purples are also high in Myrcene, which will knock you out for a good night's sleep. Linalool will likely appear in the profiles of a plant expressing b-caryophyllene as well. Lilac is high in linalool. That purple is a clue. Not a reliable one for linalool, but it can point you in the right direction.

A dispensary, on line or not, should have staff that could recommend the chemovars in their inventory that have these terpenes in them. I'd assume they have their product tested, and part of that test should be the terpene profiles.
Hey y'all, thanks for this great information. I looked over the menu from the dispensary and they have Granddaddy Purple (.54% THC) along with Blueberry (.4), Blue Dream (.5), Kushberry, Skywalker Kush, with slightly less. Interestingly enough, they are now selling the NOVA decarboxylator. I have to go to the dispensary to find out how much they are charging, for curiosities sake.

So now I'm going to have to jump in with both feet and make me some cream. First I will have to read the recipe a bunch of times.

Kelly
 

greatwolf

Well-Known Member
Summary

[Yes, I am putting the Summary of the pain cream production at the top for a reason. I will also repost the entire content in Magnus' Thread and this Summary in the 2 Holy Grail Threads because I believe it is apropos. If it is inappropriate to do this, someone please tell me and I'll refrain in the future.]

I used some of this cream on the hyper-sensitive spot on my back and the Spot that Sue and others have described on the neck (only a little here). Within a short while I felt some relief from the pressure on that spot on the back (more than I get from the Daytime caps I am taking about every 6 hours). A short time later I felt a much stronger buzz, a definite high feeling. This was much more than from the Daytime cap and much more than I expected from a cream applied to my skin.

And all of this after my concern that perhaps I had over-decarbed. I had decarbed the material separately in pint jars for 110 minutes (Kickn told me afterwards the Nova uses 75 minutes with specific heat-up and cool-down time). Then infused (part of it twice) for 110 minutes. Then heated up in double boiler to melt beeswax into final result. There should be quite a bit of degradation, right? I know there had to be loss of terpenes and breakdown of some too. So what gives?

First, we need to throw out that chart that keeps popping up on this forum. This has been written about in several threads, that other studies contradict it, that other experience contradicts it, that anecdotal evidence contradicts it, but the chart keeps reappearing, as if it were the holy grail of knowledge. We know it isn't and we must get the word out. Oldbear's current experience just proves this point - that people are worrying about the wrong thing. Perhaps we should be increasing time and/or temperature drastically to convert more THCA and CBDA (or just add CBD in at the end, which I forgot to do in my Daytime caps).

We now have the ability, and a thread exploring, adding terpenes back in. While this may add to the cost, it may be cheaper to convert more THC/CBD to make a stronger medicine and add this component back in. This at least gives us another option to explore. Especially since we could custom tailor the profile this way.

Production

I divided the yellowing fan leaves I had collected (as well as any fan leaves from buds I harvested), dried, and crushed into 2 pint jars. Packed tight, it came to about the 6 fluid oz. line in each jar. In a third jar, I placed all of sugar trim from buds as well as the remains from the Tangerine Dream kief production and a small Blueberry bud. These jars were lightly closed and processed in the Instant Pot on Manual at High Pressure for 110 minutes to decarb. When done, I did manual pressure release, removed the jars, and allowed them to cool to room temperature (to allow any surviving terpenes to settle out in the jars).

To one jar of fan leaves, I added enough Grape Seed Oil (GSO) to barely cover all of the leaves. The other jar of fan leaves I did the same with Pumpkin Seed Oil (PSO). These jars were again lightly closed and processed in the Instant Pot on Manual at High Pressure for 110 minutes to infuse the oil. When done, I did manual pressure release, removed the jars, and allowed them to cool to room temperature (to allow any surviving terpenes to settle out in the jars).

Each jar was strained through a double layer of cheesecloth and then a coffee filter into labeled half-pint jars. Yield was about 5 oz. GSO and 4 oz. PSO.

I crushed the concentrated contents of the third pint jar and it would probably be about 2 fluid oz. I used an oral syringe to add about 20 ml PSO Base just made to this jar and lightly closed the lid. I then processed it in the Instant Pot on Manual at High Pressure for 110 minutes to infuse the oil. When done, I did manual pressure release, removed the jar, and allowed it to cool to room temperature (to allow any surviving terpenes to settle out in the jar).

I repeated the straining process above and got about 15ml. I added another 15ml of the PSO Base and 15ml of the GSO base to this. Placing this oil in a double boiler (bowl floating in pot of water), I added 5ml Shea Butter ad 15ml of Beeswax. Once the beeswax melted, I added 20 drops of Tree Tea essential oil and 25 drops of Peppermint essential oil. I used the oral syringe to fill 11 and 1/2 empty lip balm containers with a light olive green colored, potent balm.

Cheers from the dark side
 

keshazel

Well-Known Member
Hi folks, how is everyone? I hope well or improving. I'm writing today to ask for the link to the most recent cream recipe posted on this forum thread. I can't remember where it is here. I'm planning on making my cream with bud. However, I have thought about making it with rosin as well. Just an idea. Why wouldn't it work? It's the equivalent of CCO. I know people are making cream with leaf, bud and CCO. Your thoughts?

Best regards, Kelly
 
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