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Mars-Hydro LED Grow Light Discussion

Thread starter #40,542

SmokeSara

Well-Known Member
By the way, got feedback pictures from a new customers from Canada, who is super happy with our Mars II 900 ,
 
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Ennui

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone, As a led grow light manufacture in China, I am very happy that I am here, be a sponsor. although we have been in this field many years, our online shop just get online this month. in order to celebrate it, we decided to give $20,$40....coupon to customers. more light you order, more discount you will get. also, all the customers will get yo-yo hanger as gift if you order within this month.

Here in China we are forbidden to growing cannabis, so if you can send me some pictures or vedio of your grow journal, maybe you can get big gift from us, we'd like to give our led grow light to you as gift:)

If you want to save money,want to get high quality product, good after service. we are the best choice. we have lights stock in USA these two days. address is :
Address: 1937 Davis Street Ste. B Unit 31
City: San Leandro
State: California
Country: United States
Postal Code: 94577

I believe there has someone know there has a warehouse, so this information is a truth. we will also have stock lights in other country, UK's stock lights is on their way. as soon as they arrive, I will tell you. All the lights we are selling have enough in stock, so we will arrange your shipment within 24hours. if you customzie your light, delivery date will be 7days., because we need time to make and test the light for you. we are far from each other. we'd like to promise everything is ok before we ship light.

Warranty, we give all customers three years warranty.

More details, please visit our website(TOPLEDGROWLIGH, Solutions Limited,LED GROWLIGHT,LED BULB,LED TUBE,grow lights,t5 grow light,hps grow light,fluorescent grow light,grow light bulb,grow light bulbs,marijuana grow light,growing light,cfl grow light,indoor grow light,grow light reflecto) or E-mail me. if necessary, I will tell all people here. My English ability is limited, so I am shy to advertise here.:)

We are a led grow light manufacture, so if you have any good ideas on led grow light, please feel free to tell me. we'd like to take your idea to make better and better led grow light for all growners.

Hope all of you grow happy with our LED grow light. :Namaste::high-five::cheer:
Midway through first grow, check my journal before judging.

I see you're a sponsor, so I'll go a little further to assist you. The main problem you and other mfg's have is an un-educated consumer. They don't know what to do with PAR values, even if they understand their significance. I have similar lights and see what I've done by just watering with correct Ph and understanding where I'm at re; PAR. You may PM me if you want elaboration.

While free stuff is always nice, helping is motivation enough for me. That you sponsor this place increases your 'face' in my esteem. That you worded your request and came across as you did made me want to help, not the carrot dangled in front of me. (Did I mention free stuff was always nice? :mrgreen:) ) :cool:
 
Thread starter #40,544

SmokeSara

Well-Known Member
I remember someone asked me before about the COB feedback? Maybe follow up on COFINEST here? He just got one of our COB. :D

 
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Thread starter #40,545

SmokeSara

Well-Known Member
Midway through first grow, check my journal before judging.

I see you're a sponsor, so I'll go a little further to assist you. The main problem you and other mfg's have is an un-educated consumer. They don't know what to do with PAR values, even if they understand their significance. I have similar lights and see what I've done by just watering with correct Ph and understanding where I'm at re; PAR. You may PM me if you want elaboration.

While free stuff is always nice, helping is motivation enough for me. That you sponsor this place increases your 'face' in my esteem. That you worded your request and came across as you did made me want to help, not the carrot dangled in front of me. (Did I mention free stuff was always nice? :mrgreen:) ) :cool:
Thank you bustedfist, I am following your grow journal, and we can see you are very professuional and responsible, if we have any needs in future, will definitely let you know. :goodjob:
 

Ennui

Well-Known Member
Thank you bustedfist, I am following your grow journal, and we can see you are very professuional and responsible, if we have any needs in future, will definitely let you know. :goodjob:
Thank you! Again,no pressure, just an offer to help. I'm 'comfortable' as I am. I have a course set, regardless. I see what's wrong with the picture so I can cut to the chase, if that translates? :cool:
 

Mr. Krip

Member of the Month: Sept 2011 - Plant of the Month : Jan 2012
Midway through first grow, check my journal before judging.

I see you're a sponsor, so I'll go a little further to assist you. The main problem you and other mfg's have is an un-educated consumer. They don't know what to do with PAR values, even if they understand their significance. I have similar lights and see what I've done by just watering with correct Ph and understanding where I'm at re; PAR. You may PM me if you want elaboration.

While free stuff is always nice, helping is motivation enough for me. That you sponsor this place increases your 'face' in my esteem. That you worded your request and came across as you did made me want to help, not the carrot dangled in front of me. (Did I mention free stuff was always nice? :mrgreen:) ) :cool:
I think you may be confusing PAR with PPFD! ;)
 

Ennui

Well-Known Member
I think you may be confusing PAR with PPFD! ;)
Ok, I'm always open for correction, let me have it like I'm in Kindergarten. I love critique and loathe smoke-blowing, IYKWIMAITYD. I haven't Googled, yet. I like to test my deductive reasoning every chance I get.

Am I using it incorrectly in that I should be using PPFD (heard it, don't recall specifics) to explain the concentration alone? I can see that. Should I be using 'PAR' when explaining concentration combined with spectrum?
 

Mr. Krip

Member of the Month: Sept 2011 - Plant of the Month : Jan 2012
Ok, I'm always open for correction, let me have it like I'm in Kindergarten. I love critique and loathe smoke-blowing, IYKWIMAITYD. I haven't Googled, yet. I like to test my deductive reasoning every chance I get.

Am I using it incorrectly in that I should be using PPFD (heard it, don't recall specifics) to explain the concentration alone? I can see that. Should I be using 'PAR' when explaining concentration combined with spectrum?
PAR is Photosynthetic Active Radiation which are the frequencies of light used for photosynthesis. This is light between 400 and 700nm and is the only parts of the light spectrum used for photosynthesis. These PAR values correspond to the wavelengths of the lights in an LED fixture.

PPFD is Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and refers to the amount of PAR that actually arrives at the plant and is measured in micromoles per square meter per second (μmol/m2/s).

You really can't control the PAR. The lighting manufacturer does that when they select the wavelenghts of the chips. The distance from the plant determines the PPFD (how much of the PAR they receive).

Personally, although I understand it (a little!), I've never bothered to measure the PPFD. I start with the manufacturer's recommended distance from the plant (assuming they did the research on PPFD! :D ), then either move the light closer or back it off depending on how the plants respond with the goal to get them as close as possible to the light without them showing any negative reaction.

I hope that helps!

:Namaste:

K
 

Ennui

Well-Known Member
PAR is Photosynthetic Active Radiation which are the frequencies of light used for photosynthesis. This is light between 400 and 700nm and is the only parts of the light spectrum used for photosynthesis. These PAR values correspond to the wavelengths of the lights in an LED fixture.

PPFD is Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and refers to the amount of PAR that actually arrives at the plant and is measured in micromoles per square meter per second (μmol/m2/s).

You really can't control the PAR. The lighting manufacturer does that when they select the wavelenghts of the chips. The distance from the plant determines the PPFD (how much of the PAR they receive).

Personally, although I understand it (a little!), I've never bothered to measure the PPFD. I start with the manufacturer's recommended distance from the plant (assuming they did the research on PPFD! :D ), then either move the light closer or back it off depending on how the plants respond with the goal to get them as close as possible to the light without them showing any negative reaction.

I hope that helps!

:Namaste:

K
Thank You! You're the first person I'm following, you're the only one who's corrected me.

That's exactly how I thought it was, but during my research I saw PAR being used in a general sense and carried it over as it's what people would recognize in the ads they were viewing. Always bothered me that I knew the term was not being used precisely, just went with the flow for common understanding's sake.

I said somewhere that I thought it should be photosynthetic activating radiation to be precise. How can radiation be photosynthetically active? It can't, it activates photosynthesis.

I'm chuffed. Even though I had it straight in my mind (in hindsight) the confirmation clears any lingering doubt.

Thanks again. :cool:
 

Mr. Krip

Member of the Month: Sept 2011 - Plant of the Month : Jan 2012
Thank You! You're the first person I'm following, you're the only one who's corrected me.

That's exactly how I thought it was, but during my research I saw PAR being used in a general sense and carried it over as it's what people would recognize in the ads they were viewing. Always bothered me that I knew the term was not being used precisely, just went with the flow for common understanding's sake.

I said somewhere that I thought it should be photosynthetic activating radiation to be precise. How can radiation be photosynthetically active? It can't, it activates photosynthesis.

I'm chuffed. Even though I had it straight in my mind (in hindsight) the confirmation clears any lingering doubt.

Thanks again. :cool:
No worries, Brother! I'm happy to help! :high-five:
 

Mr. Krip

Member of the Month: Sept 2011 - Plant of the Month : Jan 2012
PAR is Photosynthetic Active Radiation which are the frequencies of light used for photosynthesis. This is light between 400 and 700nm and is the only parts of the light spectrum used for photosynthesis. These PAR values correspond to the wavelengths of the lights in an LED fixture.

PPFD is Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density and refers to the amount of PAR that actually arrives at the plant and is measured in micromoles per square meter per second (μmol/m2/s).

You really can't control the PAR. The lighting manufacturer does that when they select the wavelenghts of the chips. The distance from the plant determines the PPFD (how much of the PAR they receive).

Personally, although I understand it (a little!), I've never bothered to measure the PPFD. I start with the manufacturer's recommended distance from the plant (assuming they did the research on PPFD! :D ), then either move the light closer or back it off depending on how the plants respond with the goal to get them as close as possible to the light without them showing any negative reaction.

I hope that helps!

:Namaste:

K
Since I wrote the above response on a LED thread, I thought I'd add one more "technical" concept and then break it down in some "layman's" terms...

The one additional technical concept is called the Inverse Square Law and represents the "nemesis" for us indoor growers. The Inverse Square Law basically says that if you increase the distance between the light source and the plant by "X", the amount of light reaching the plant decreases by 1/x-squared (raised to 2nd power). So, the amount of light reaching your plants at 2' away is 1/4th of the amount of light reaching the plants at 1' away. Twice the distance is 1/4th the amount of light, 4x the distance would be 1/16th the amount of light, etc.)

So, putting some of these concepts together...

Where HPS, MH, CFL, etc can all be used to grow MMJ, many of the watts you're paying for are for parts of the spectrum (frequencies/wavelengths) that are not even used by the plants since they fall outside of the PAR range of 400nm-700nm. One of the benefits of LED is that you're only getting PAR values that ARE usable by the plant. So, more of the money you spend on your electric bill actually is usable by the plant.

So, what's the PPFD? Well, even at the same distance, the PPFD changes based on the wavelength of the light. Some wavelengths can travel further distances before they start to "fall off", however, thanks to the Inverse Square Law, we know that the closer we can get the plants to the light, the more PPFD we can get to the plant.

Where the HPS & MH will beat an LED is in penetrating the canopy, so the light can be further away to get the usable wavelengths lower in the canopy, but you're still sending parts of the spectrum that are not usable and have no bearing on photosynthesis.

So, the only thing to watch is that you don't have the light source so close to the plants that they show signs of light or heat stress. Some plants may tolerate more than others, but the most they can tolerate without compromising the plant health (or, possibly the lighting footprint to other plants!), the better!

Luckily, when we grow indoors, we're typically not growing 10' plants. In a 7' tent with the light 1' from the ceiling, 1' from the canopy, and a 1' tall container, you're gonna get a plant no more than 4' tall, or so. Today's LED technology can easily penetrate those smaller canopies, get more usable spectrum to the plants, and allow the grower to place their plants close to the source without negative effect.

I hope that helps some others! ;)

:Namaste:

K
 
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Ennui

Well-Known Member
Since I wrote the above response on a LED thread, I thought I'd add one more "technical" concept and then break it down in some "layman's" terms...

The one additional technical concept is called the Inverse Square Law and represents the "nemesis" for us indoor growers. The Inverse Square Law basically says that if you increase the distance between the light source and the plant by "X", the amount of light reaching the plant decreases by 1/x-squared (raised to 2nd power). So, the amount of light reaching your plants at 2' away is 1/4th of the amount of light reaching the plants at 1' away. Twice the distance is 1/4th the amount of light, 4x the distance would be 1/16th the amount of light, etc.)

So, putting some of these concepts together...

Where HPS, MH, CFL, etc can all be used to grow MMJ, many of the watts you're paying for are for parts of the spectrum (frequencies/wavelengths) that are not even used by the plants since they fall outside of the PAR range of 400nm-700nm. One of the benefits of LED is that you're only getting PAR values that ARE usable by the plant. So, more of the money you spend on your electric bill actually is usable by the plant.

So, what's the PPFD? Well, even at the same distance, the PPFD changes based on the wavelength of the light. Some wavelengths can travel further distances before they start to "fall off", however, thanks to the Inverse Square Law, we know that the closer we can get the plants to the light, the more PPFD we can get to the plant.

Where the HPS & MH will beat an LED is in penetrating the canopy, so the light can be further away to get the usable wavelengths lower in the canopy, but you're still sending parts of the spectrum that are not usable and have no bearing on photosynthesis.

So, the only thing to watch is that you don't have the light source so close to the plants that they show signs of light or heat stress. Some plants may tolerate more than others, but the most they can tolerate without compromising the plant health (or, possibly the lighting footprint to other plants!), the better!

Luckily, when we grow indoors, we're typically not growing 10' plants. In a 7' tent with the light 1' from the ceiling, 1' from the canopy, and a 1' tall container, you're gonna get a plant no more than 4' tall, or so. Today's LED technology can easily penetrate those smaller canopies, get more usable spectrum to the plants, and allow the grower to place their plants close to the source without negative effect.

I hope that helps some others! ;)

:Namaste:

K
Good info, confirms a lot here. Good snapshot as to why I decided to train as I did. What about Mylar's effect on the Inverse Square Law?
 

Ennui

Well-Known Member
I was looking at an above pic and noticed the power cord jack is on the top of the unit. That one factor, had I known then what I know today, something like that would have swayed me to consider this option over the one I chose. With my deal, the cord jack is on the end and I'm constantly having to remind myself it's there. When I daisy-chain, the location and length tend to want to skew the lights and bracing's required to keep them in the correct orientation. Basically, any LED on the market will grow if used correctly, it's the details like this and spectrum tweaks that differentiate them. Glad I joined the discussion, this helped connect some dots in my thinking.
 

Mr. Krip

Member of the Month: Sept 2011 - Plant of the Month : Jan 2012
Good info, confirms a lot here. Good snapshot as to why I decided to train as I did. What about Mylar's effect on the Inverse Square Law?
Well, mylar doesn't change the Inverse Square Law (it's a law! :D ) but becomes "part" of it.

Depending on the distance of the mylar to the light, the mylar will receive some amount of light. If you were to double the distance between the mylar and the light, the amount of light reaching the mylar would be 1/4th.

Assuming the light doesn't hit the plant, it will hit the mylar walls of the grow space. Once the light hits the mylar, being reflective, the mylar now becomes a new (2nd) light source. If the mylar is 97% reflective, 97% of the light gets bounced back to the plants (or, another wall to be reflected back as a 3rd light source!). Whatever amount of light is hitting the plant from being reflected by the mylar is 4x the amount of light that would be reflected back if the mylar was twice the distance from the plant.

So, you lose a LOT of light traveling to the mylar, then having 97% of that traveling back to the plant and losing more along the way, but whatever makes it back to the plant from the mylar is surely better than it not hitting the plant, at all; which is exactly what happened when the light hit the mylar the first time! ;)
 
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Ennui

Well-Known Member
Well, mylar doesn't change the Inverse Square Law (it's a law! :D ) but becomes "part" of it.

Depending on the distance of the mylar to the light, the mylar will receive some amount of light. If you were to double the distance between the mylar and the light, the amount of light reaching the mylar would be 1/4th.

Assuming the light doesn't hit the plant, it will hit the mylar walls of the grow space. Once the light hits the mylar, being reflective, the mylar now becomes a new (2nd) light source. If the mylar is 97% reflective, 97% of the light gets bounced back to the plants (or, another wall to be reflected back as a 3rd light source!). Whatever amount of light is hitting the plant from being reflected by the mylar is 4x the amount of light that would be reflected back if the mylar was twice the distance from the plant.

So, you lose a LOT of light traveling to the mylar, then having 97% of that traveling back to the plant and losing more along the way, but whatever makes it back to the plant from the mylar is surely better than it not hitting the plant, at all; which is exactly what happened when the light hit the mylar the first time! ;)
Yep, almost like a turbo scavenges waste to increase intake.
 
Thread starter #40,559

SmokeSara

Well-Known Member
Oh, so many info to catch up to! Thank you @Mr. Krip for the clearification! :goodjob:
And PAR, PPF, PPFD is always the hardest part when there is someone new to indoor growing. and lights. For me as well. and I find a very easy explaination for my colleagues when they just come to the company:
- Par is the stuff that shows how good the lights can be absorbed by the plants.
- PPF, and PPFD is the data that shows PAR. :green_heart:
Par data differs depend on the height of the light, and also if you use high reflector cloth or grow tent, the data will increase as well. :surf: