420 Magazine Background

Mars-Hydro TSL-2000: Unboxing & Installation

Metal Halide

Well-Known Member
Hope one day our lights will replace all the other lights. :lot-o-toke::ganjamon::ganjamon:
The tides are turning. My mate owns and operates one of the biggest hydro stores and importers in my state. he just had a big interview with some Chinese company bringing in a sort of QB/COB lighting system that you control via your phone. It's some pretty high tech stuff. I asked him if it was mars hydro and he said no. But they are doing mass experiments atm in huge warehouses. It's an interesting time to be alive with the ever-changing landscape of lighting vs yield vs quality vs cost vs reliability vs longevity. I think im gonna just experiment.
I wish Mars hydro did afterpay
 

SmokeSara

420 Sponsor
The tides are turning. My mate owns and operates one of the biggest hydro stores and importers in my state. he just had a big interview with some Chinese company bringing in a sort of QB/COB lighting system that you control via your phone. It's some pretty high tech stuff. I asked him if it was mars hydro and he said no. But they are doing mass experiments atm in huge warehouses. It's an interesting time to be alive with the ever-changing landscape of lighting vs yield vs quality vs cost vs reliability vs longevity. I think im gonna just experiment.
I wish Mars hydro did afterpay
We seldom do off line business, that is why. Compare to other company who are selling to agent and then in local store, we make our own brand and sell our own, that is why we are usually not a fan of exhibition or cannabis cups. But with more and more growers interested in our products, we also get more and more retailers around the world as well. Hopefully one day, we can cooperate with your friend. :D :Namaste:
For the payment method, it is really hard to manage on our website, since we do world wide business. So we can only use the world wide accepted payment options. And so far, paypal seems the one to go mostly. In China we use wechat payment and alipay mostly. And in AU, there are zip pay, and other payment method, that are very advanced. But in most countries, the advanced payment method is still not working. So we have to stick with paypal. At least for now. :Namaste:
 

Metal Halide

Well-Known Member
We seldom do off line business, that is why. Compare to other company who are selling to agent and then in local store, we make our own brand and sell our own, that is why we are usually not a fan of exhibition or cannabis cups. But with more and more growers interested in our products, we also get more and more retailers around the world as well. Hopefully one day, we can cooperate with your friend. :D :Namaste:
For the payment method, it is really hard to manage on our website, since we do world wide business. So we can only use the world wide accepted payment options. And so far, paypal seems the one to go mostly. In China we use wechat payment and alipay mostly. And in AU, there are zip pay, and other payment method, that are very advanced. But in most countries, the advanced payment method is still not working. So we have to stick with paypal. At least for now. :Namaste:
the way things are going it will be bitcoin wallet payments before you know it. Mars has always been huge here since we are both in australasia and with our close ties to China and the trade we have, it has always made it easy to get your products via ebay or stores but none of the bricks and mortar stores here have your new line as of yet. But we usually get it before the rest of the world. unlike U.S stuff which we usually get last. i.e QBs.

Can you believe that only 1 supplier in all of Australia can supply QBs here at all. I got quoted $660 AUD for a qb from the states which costs u.s citizens only like $250 US. Its crazy hence my reluctance for QBs. They are very expensive here $580 for 288 with up to a 2 month wait AU stock or i have to go through the states. Its like $150 AUD for delivery alone
 

TorturedSoul

Member of the Month: May 2009, Oct 2010, Sept 2017
Congrats Salt! Glad the wife won this for you. Hope you enjoy and have a great Memorial Day!! Thanks for all the help so far !
75th anniversary of D-Day a week from this coming Thursday. Was the 6th of June, 1949.

We seldom do off line business, that is why. Compare to other company who are selling to agent and then in local store, we make our own brand and sell our own, that is why we are usually not a fan of exhibition or cannabis cups. But with more and more growers interested in our products, we also get more and more retailers around the world as well.
The "brick and mortar" business model certainly isn't what it used to be. People still shop at actual physical stores, but if you discount the the current set of elderly people and the homeless, it's not a huge percentage of shoppers. Our current set of the elderly are dying off, like the elderly do, and they're being replaced by people who shop online at least some of the time. The homeless - well, that's more reliable because the average homeless person doesn't have a delivery address, but he/she is also far more likely to be buying only the basic necessities (plus his/her drug/self-medication of choice, I suppose).

Every time I walk into a department store, I get the feeling that half the people there are just taking advantage of the store ( / its owner / its employees / their local tax base) by using the opportunity to personally examine and handle merchandise that they fully intend to go home and purchase online.

When a company has a viable online sales model - as Mars-Hydro does - it must be a difficult position to it to consider the traditional sales model from. There would, of course, be some additional expenses involved, and the expected return wouldn't be all that great. Some of the people who would end up purchasing the company's products in a physical store are already purchasing them online, so no additional sales, only less profit from the sales. There would be some impulse buys, probably. Maybe your product display looks "better" than a competitor's, and you end up with a sale that would otherwise have gone to the competitor.

But every entity involved in the chain from manufacturer to point of final sale is someone with their hand out, wanting a piece of the product's price. Unless that price is the same, or nearly the same, as your online price, most people would just think, "Hey, that looks like a good product" - and then go home and order it. So you watch your profit margin get eaten away when you sell in physical stores (versus online). Remember, this company doesn't need third parties for its online sales; it sells them directly to the customer from its website.

I wish Mars hydro did afterpay
Here in the United States of America, there is the concept of COD (collect on delivery). What some people referred to as "cash on delivery," which is ironic because you cannot pay for it with cash. UPS drivers, and probably other major delivery services as well, do not accept cash, so the customer has to have some form of non-cash payment ready (which also means that someone must be there at the time of delivery). This kind of partially defeats the purpose of the COD concept.

Some people might, for whatever reason, don't have traditional credit cards. But it's pretty easy (here, at least) to get a prepaid debit card. Companies mail the things out as junk mail, just take one to the nearest convenience store and give the cashier some money. He/she will, after taking a small(?) cut, complete the transaction and your money will appear on your new debit card, ready to use for online (et cetera) purchases.

A company can set up its own credit services for its customers. Sadly, by and large, the average person who does not have access to a credit card... is not a very good credit risk :rolleyes: . So you end up with interest rates that are just shy of being in danger of breaking usury laws in order to make up for the (sometimes significant) percentage of customers who won't end up paying the bill. Which makes this kind of thing far less likely to be used by the customers a business actually wants, which is to say, those who can and will pay for the products.

In other words, it's bad for the business and bad for most of the customers. For all of the customers, IMHO, because those who'd be using high-interest merchant credit services generally struggle to pay their bills, get behind, the interest builds up... and, pretty soon, they're in the same position that those who borrow money from a loan shark are in (only with slightly less breakage ;) ), to wit, they're spending all their money on the interest and never seem to pay down the principal.

Metal Halide, do some searching to find out if there are any prepaid debit cards available in your country. Perhaps something like a "Visa gift card," if nothing else. Or, if you have a friend/relative who has access to banking services, see if he/she will let you give him/her some money and pay it into your PayPal account (anyone with an email address and a pulse can get a PayPal account, and I'm not entirely convinced that they require their customers to have a pulse). If so, do that thing and you will then be able to make online purchases (one assumes).
 

Metal Halide

Well-Known Member
75th anniversary of D-Day a week from this coming Thursday. Was the 6th of June, 1949.



The "brick and mortar" business model certainly isn't what it used to be. People still shop at actual physical stores, but if you discount the the current set of elderly people and the homeless, it's not a huge percentage of shoppers. Our current set of the elderly are dying off, like the elderly do, and they're being replaced by people who shop online at least some of the time. The homeless - well, that's more reliable because the average homeless person doesn't have a delivery address, but he/she is also far more likely to be buying only the basic necessities (plus his/her drug/self-medication of choice, I suppose).

Every time I walk into a department store, I get the feeling that half the people there are just taking advantage of the store ( / its owner / its employees / their local tax base) by using the opportunity to personally examine and handle merchandise that they fully intend to go home and purchase online.

When a company has a viable online sales model - as Mars-Hydro does - it must be a difficult position to it to consider the traditional sales model from. There would, of course, be some additional expenses involved, and the expected return wouldn't be all that great. Some of the people who would end up purchasing the company's products in a physical store are already purchasing them online, so no additional sales, only less profit from the sales. There would be some impulse buys, probably. Maybe your product display looks "better" than a competitor's, and you end up with a sale that would otherwise have gone to the competitor.

But every entity involved in the chain from manufacturer to point of final sale is someone with their hand out, wanting a piece of the product's price. Unless that price is the same, or nearly the same, as your online price, most people would just think, "Hey, that looks like a good product" - and then go home and order it. So you watch your profit margin get eaten away when you sell in physical stores (versus online). Remember, this company doesn't need third parties for its online sales; it sells them directly to the customer from its website.



Here in the United States of America, there is the concept of COD (collect on delivery). What some people referred to as "cash on delivery," which is ironic because you cannot pay for it with cash. UPS drivers, and probably other major delivery services as well, do not accept cash, so the customer has to have some form of non-cash payment ready (which also means that someone must be there at the time of delivery). This kind of partially defeats the purpose of the COD concept.

Some people might, for whatever reason, don't have traditional credit cards. But it's pretty easy (here, at least) to get a prepaid debit card. Companies mail the things out as junk mail, just take one to the nearest convenience store and give the cashier some money. He/she will, after taking a small(?) cut, complete the transaction and your money will appear on your new debit card, ready to use for online (et cetera) purchases.

A company can set up its own credit services for its customers. Sadly, by and large, the average person who does not have access to a credit card... is not a very good credit risk :rolleyes: . So you end up with interest rates that are just shy of being in danger of breaking usury laws in order to make up for the (sometimes significant) percentage of customers who won't end up paying the bill. Which makes this kind of thing far less likely to be used by the customers a business actually wants, which is to say, those who can and will pay for the products.

In other words, it's bad for the business and bad for most of the customers. For all of the customers, IMHO, because those who'd be using high-interest merchant credit services generally struggle to pay their bills, get behind, the interest builds up... and, pretty soon, they're in the same position that those who borrow money from a loan shark are in (only with slightly less breakage ;) ), to wit, they're spending all their money on the interest and never seem to pay down the principal.

Metal Halide, do some searching to find out if there are any prepaid debit cards available in your country. Perhaps something like a "Visa gift card," if nothing else. Or, if you have a friend/relative who has access to banking services, see if he/she will let you give him/her some money and pay it into your PayPal account (anyone with an email address and a pulse can get a PayPal account, and I'm not entirely convinced that they require their customers to have a pulse). If so, do that thing and you will then be able to make online purchases (one assumes).
ahh, yep precisely why I don't and have and have never had a credit card cuz. Also cause I haven't worked in over a decade and no sane lender would look at me:lot-o-toke:. Afterpay is is like the old school laybuy system but you get your item straight away with no interest. Everyone has it here even my local hydro shop which is sick.
 

Old Salt

Member of the Month: Apr, Nov 2019
Ok, I've got to chime in on this. Shipping is a huge expense for any business. If merchandise is bulk shipped, by the container load for example, there are large savings to be had. If shipments to retailers are made in pallet sized loads, it still can provide savings over factory direct shipping to individual customers. This savings can provide an acceptable profit margin for brick and mortar stores, or even on-line resellers.
 

Metal Halide

Well-Known Member
Ok, I've got to chime in on this. Shipping is a huge expense for any business. If merchandise is bulk shipped, by the container load for example, there are large savings to be had. If shipments to retailers are made in pallet sized loads, it still can provide savings over factory direct shipping to individual customers. This savings can provide an acceptable profit margin for brick and mortar stores, or even on-line resellers.
Yeah, im trying convince my local hydro to start stocking more than cmh, cob and hid for that exact reason but they are reluctant
 

Old Salt

Member of the Month: Apr, Nov 2019
Yeah, im trying convince my local hydro to start stocking more than cmh, cob and hid for that exact reason but they are reluctant
The other big problem for retailers is old stock. The LED / COB market is moving towards a whiter light. HLG, and now Mars-Hydro are leaders in this swing. Now, imagine that you have 10 - 20K invested in the older low cost lights. What are is the retailer going to do with them? You may have to dispose of them at fire sale prices, or even recycle them. There's no other way, and the retailer would take a beating.

Factory direct sales gets rid of this problem. The factory simply holds the release of new product until stock levels are sufficiently depleted. The same thing can be accomplished with a distribution network, but will require close cooperation of the chain with the manufacturer.
 
Top Bottom