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Medical Marijuana Gets Support

PFlynn

New Member
Peoria, Illinois - Sixty-eight percent of registered Illinois voters favor legalizing marijuana for medical use by seriously and terminally ill patients, according to a recent survey funded by a group that promotes the drug's legalization.

The survey, conducted last month by Mason-Dixon Polling and Research Inc. but paid for by the Washington, D.C.,- based Marijuana Policy Project, polled 625 registered voters across the state. Findings, however, were released Monday by the advocacy group on the heels of an Illinois Senate committee approving a bill legalizing medical marijuana.

When asked how strongly they support "allowing seriously and terminally ill patients to use and grow medical marijuana for personal use if their doctors recommend it," 42 percent of respondents statewide said they strongly supported it, 26 percent somewhat supported it, 12 percent somewhat opposed it and 15 percent strongly opposed. Five percent of respondents had no opinion.

In a similar survey of the Peoria area - which interviewed 400 voters in Peoria, Knox, Stark, Marshall, Woodford, Tazewell, Mason and Fulton counties - 31 percent of interviewed voters said they strongly supported it, 28 percent somewhat supported it, 13 percent somewhat opposed it, 21 percent strongly opposed it and 7 percent had no opinion.

"I think the poll results aren't surprising at all," said Dan Bernath, a spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project. "This is becoming less and less a political issue but more and more a public health issue."

The group cites a 1999 report by the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine as evidence the drug is rarely addictive and doesn't necessarily lead to harder narcotics. Advocates claim the plant can be used to treat pain, sleep, nausea, appetite and tremors without serious physical or psychological harm.

Some officials, however, aren't buying the results, saying the framing of the poll's questions skewed answers.

"When you couch it in terms of should sick people use marijuana when they are sick and dying, of course people would say yes," said Laimutis Nargelenas, deputy director of the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police. "I think it's pretty poor that they have to hide behind sick people."

The Illinois State Police also opposes the proposal and believes its wording would create a loophole to allow motorists to drive under the influence of marijuana.

Nargelenas said law enforcement has no philosophical objection to medicinal marijuana but sees the current bill as nothing more than the precursor to fully legalizing the drug for all - ill or not. The measure also sends a mixed message to children on how to deal with drug use, he added.

Currently, 12 states and six cities have laws legalizing marijuana use for medical reasons, but buying, selling or possessing the plant is still a federal crime.

According to Illinois' proposed legislation, sponsored by state Sen. John Cullerton, D-Chicago, patients with chronic or debilitating disease could receive prescriptions for medical marijuana as well as "no more than 8 plants and two and one-half ounces of usable marijuana."



Source: Peoria Journal Star (IL)
Copyright: 2008 Peoria Journal Star
Contact: forum@pjstar.com
Website: PJStar.com - Journal Star, Peoria, IL 61643
 

Herb Fellow

New Member
Nargelenas said law enforcement has no philosophical objection to medicinal marijuana (Then lets see more compassion from law enforcement)but sees the current bill as nothing more than the precursor to fully legalizing the drug for all - ill or not(and what's wrong with that?. The measure also sends a mixed message to children on how to deal with drug use, he added (Like seeing parents/grandparents have a pharmaceutical cocktail from their medicine cabinet sends the right message.)
 
Peoria, Illinois - Sixty-eight percent of registered Illinois voters favor legalizing marijuana for medical use by seriously and terminally ill patients, according to a recent survey funded by a group that promotes the drug's legalization.

The survey, conducted last month by Mason-Dixon Polling and Research Inc. but paid for by the Washington, D.C.,- based Marijuana Policy Project, polled 625 registered voters across the state. Findings, however, were released Monday by the advocacy group on the heels of an Illinois Senate committee approving a bill legalizing medical marijuana.

When asked how strongly they support "allowing seriously and terminally ill patients to use and grow medical marijuana for personal use if their doctors recommend it," 42 percent of respondents statewide said they strongly supported it, 26 percent somewhat supported it, 12 percent somewhat opposed it and 15 percent strongly opposed. Five percent of respondents had no opinion.

In a similar survey of the Peoria area - which interviewed 400 voters in Peoria, Knox, Stark, Marshall, Woodford, Tazewell, Mason and Fulton counties - 31 percent of interviewed voters said they strongly supported it, 28 percent somewhat supported it, 13 percent somewhat opposed it, 21 percent strongly opposed it and 7 percent had no opinion.

"I think the poll results aren't surprising at all," said Dan Bernath, a spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project. "This is becoming less and less a political issue but more and more a public health issue."

The group cites a 1999 report by the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine as evidence the drug is rarely addictive and doesn't necessarily lead to harder narcotics. Advocates claim the plant can be used to treat pain, sleep, nausea, appetite and tremors without serious physical or psychological harm.

Some officials, however, aren't buying the results, saying the framing of the poll's questions skewed answers.

"When you couch it in terms of should sick people use marijuana when they are sick and dying, of course people would say yes," said Laimutis Nargelenas, deputy director of the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police. "I think it's pretty poor that they have to hide behind sick people."

The Illinois State Police also opposes the proposal and believes its wording would create a loophole to allow motorists to drive under the influence of marijuana.

Nargelenas said law enforcement has no philosophical objection to medicinal marijuana but sees the current bill as nothing more than the precursor to fully legalizing the drug for all - ill or not. The measure also sends a mixed message to children on how to deal with drug use, he added.

Currently, 12 states and six cities have laws legalizing marijuana use for medical reasons, but buying, selling or possessing the plant is still a federal crime.

According to Illinois' proposed legislation, sponsored by state Sen. John Cullerton, D-Chicago, patients with chronic or debilitating disease could receive prescriptions for medical marijuana as well as "no more than 8 plants and two and one-half ounces of usable marijuana."



Source: Peoria Journal Star (IL)
Copyright: 2008 Peoria Journal Star
Contact: forum@pjstar.com
Website: PJStar.com - Journal Star, Peoria, IL 61643

I hate to say this but my state has approved medical marijuana, and I have Crohns disease and the fact that I have a two year old DUI is screwing me over and I only know this because my own doctor told me. And I cant get approved, and the bud is the only thing that keeps me eating, but that don't matter. In my state I feel like its who know or if not good luck with it all.
 

Herb Fellow

New Member
That sucks! I have Crohns and mmj is a life saver. I don't understand the whole deal with the two year old DUI. How can they forbid you from taking one prescription over another? "I'm sorry sir, but you can no longer have your heart medication because we see you had a DUI two years ago." "Yes, you might die, but you should have thought about that before you got behind that wheel two years ago." That is just screwed up! I hope you are still getting some meds even without a card.
 
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