Milton Keynes Pro-Cannabis Group Slams Professor Wayne Hall's Report

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A pro-cannabis group in Milton Keynes has hit out at a World Health Organisation (WHO) report that smoking the plant has negative long-term effects. Today (Tuesday) a report has been released by Professor Wayne Hall, a drugs advisor to WHO, which argues the long-term effects of cannabis are negative. The 20 year study claims cannabis is highly addictive and causes mental health problems. But one of the creators of Milton Keynes Cannabis Social Club, which has a community Facebook page with nearly 1000 members, argued: "Firstly, the idea that cannabis is a 'gateway drug' is flawed.

"Most people I knew tried tobacco or alcohol before cannabis, so are they not the 'gateway drugs' if such a theory is even true? "Much of the report is based around effects of cannabis smoked as a teenager. With a government controlled regulation of the market and with the use of licensed shops or cafés we could see cannabis available to citizens 18 plus only. "Also, even this 'damning' report states the chance of a fatal overdose is 'very small' and cannabis was 'not as harmful as other illicit drugs such as amphetamine, cocaine and heroin', with which it is classified under the law in many countries."

On Milton Keynes Cannabis Social Club, which currently has 988 Likes on Facebook, people discuss the reasons why they think the Class B drug should be legalised and what happens in other areas, like the US state of Colorado, where it is legal. Our source added: "The group was set up originally because we wanted a platform to dispel much of the anti-cannabis propaganda being spread all over Facebook as a reaction to what, at the time, was the start of the legalisation process in Colorado.

"We wanted to be right on ground zero of the legalisation debate in our region, helping to spread awareness." Many of the Facebook page users believe the drug should be legalised and stop the 'black market' which currently exists. "Milton Keynes has always been a place filled with forward thinking minds and progressive people", said the page spokesman, "It's a plant. A very wonderful plant with many uses other than just to get high.

"I'd rather see this plant regulated and available to citizens 18 or over, with scope to grow a personal amount. It was made illegal for little to no reason and has been kept that way due to old propaganda and leftover stigma from previous generations." Users on the page strongly feel the drug has medical benefits for illnesses including cancers, tuberculosis and multiple sclerosis. But what do you think to the group's views, should the drug be legalised?

See our full interview with the Facebook page creator below:

1. Why was the Facebook group set up?
The Facebook group was set up originally because we wanted a platform to dispel much of the anti-cannabis propaganda being spread all over Facebook as a reaction to what, at the time, was the start of the legalisation process in Colorado (which has since succeeded) and the Cannabis Club social revolution in Spain, we wanted to be right on ground zero of the legalisation debate in our region, helping to spread awareness for groups like NORML, LEAP and associates.

2. Why do you think so many people in Milton Keynes want the drug legalised?
Milton Keynes has always been a place filled with forward thinking minds and progressive people. The days of the stigma surrounding cannabis use are slowly coming to an end and it is becoming more and more socially acceptable by the day. Medicinally, cannabis has been proven to be an effective part of treatment for many diseases, illnesses and ailments and not only this, but recreationally it has been proven to be a safer alternative to many already available, legal, substances on offer to citizens. I think the question is not "why do they want it legalised", more "is there a single good reason that it is not legal?"

3. What are the positives and negatives of the drug?
It is a cheaper alternative medicine for patients of various cancers, tuberculosis, MS, ALS (of the famous ice bucket challenge), Fibromyalgia, Anorexia, Bulimia, per gram it costs upwards of 1000% less than NHS alternatives (i.e.: fibromyalgia, the standard NHS routine costing something like £9k a year). The negatives are that you can go to jail for life for even possessing it, and that if you are already a sufferer of, or are susceptible to certain very rare versions of schizophrenia or psychosis, you MAY (even though it is still very unlikely) find symptoms of these brought on more.

Please find some reference links below:
Pain Killer / Anti Nausea
Shrinks tumours
Slows artery clogging
Cannabis Reduces Skin Cancer
Cancer
Derivatives of cannabis for anti-cancer treatment

Cons:
Cannabis is not for everyone, there can be some negative effects including feeling light-headed and sick (Whitey), anxiety and paranoia. Personally, I feel much of the paranoia comes from the risk of getting caught and with legalisation this could be less of an issue.

4. Does it prevent cancer?
It has been shown, in tests, to shrink tumours and many have claimed they have cured their cancer with cannabis. Also I know it is widely used in legalised/medicinal states to combat the nausea, pain and loss of appetite from chemotherapy I believe that it has the properties to, but as I am not a scientists myself I rely on what I read from reputable sources. Have a look.

Laboratory/Animal/Preclinical Studies
Further evidence that cannabis reduces tumor growth in new study
Marijuana Compounds Can Kill Some Cancer Cells: Study
Cancer Treatment
Scientists reveal how THC found in cannabis "could slow cancer tumor growth"
Cannabis oil cured my terminal cancer

And find here some medical studies in support of this theory:
20 Medical Studies That Show Cannabis Can Be A Potential Cure Cancer

5. What drugs are more dangerous?
There are many more dangerous substances for the user readily available! There have been 0 recorded deaths from cannabis in comparison to in 2012 alone where there were 8,367 alcohol-related deaths in the UK and an estimated 100,000 deaths each year from smoking tobacco! Cannabis can be vaporised or smoked pure, eliminating the need for these dangerous substances Here is a good study / chart regarding dangerous substances

6. What do you think would happen if the drug was legalised in the UK?
If the drug was legalised in the UK, natural black market greed would subside (it is the one thing other than the plant's inherent illegality that keeps the price anywhere near £10 a gram, even the most conservative estimates from Colorado and Washington suggest it will be as cheap as $2 a gram once the remnants of the black market are stamped out, and let's be very honest, not much else would happen, there would be minimal negative or adverse effects, and if we are anything like Colorado or Washington we would see a cannabis-boom in taxable producing the end result of a benefit to society.

7. Why should the government legalise it?
It's a plant. A very wonderful plant with many uses other than just to get high. Ask any police officer if they'd rather deal with a drunken person or a stoned one. Ask any security guard or bouncer the same. Do you think street dealers ask for ID when selling cannabis? I don't think so. I'd rather see this plant regulated and available to citizens 18 or over, with scope to grow a personal amount. It was made illegal for little to no reason and has been kept that way due to old propaganda and leftover stigma from previous generations (How Cannabis was Criminalised). Why shouldn't we legalise it? Why should they continue to spend billions of pounds fighting a prohibitionist "war" that can never be won? Especially when there are actually harmful drugs like alcohol costing the NHS and the police and the taxpayer billions of pounds every year, compared to the minimal costs of cannabis "misuse".

8. What happens in other countries where the drug is legal?
As you can see, there have been plenty of positive outcomes regarding legalisation from all over the world!
What is marijuana legalization? - Everything you need to know about marijuana legalization...
Since marijuana legalization, highway fatalities in Colorado are at near-historic lows
Marijuana Regulation in Colorado After Six Months of Retail Sales and 18 Months of Decriminalization
Heroic Uruguay deserves a Nobel peace prize for legalising cannabis
What Legalizing Pot In Uruguay Means For the World

9. What do you think to the WHO report released today (Tuesday)
Firstly, the idea that cannabis is a gateway drug is flawed. From what I remember most people I knew tried tobacco or alcohol before cannabis, so are they not the 'gateway drugs' if such a theory is even true? Also, much of the report is based around effects of cannabis smoked as a teenager. With a government controlled regulation of the market and with the use of licensed shops or cafés we could see cannabis available to citizens 18+ only.

Street dealers won't ask for ID, so how is prohibition really keeping cannabis away from young people? It's already shown to be failing by the fact the report itself says almost as many young people smoke cannabis as smoke cigarettes. If you bash your head against the same wall over and over, you'll only knock yourself out. Why not try a different approach?

Also, even this 'damning' report states the chance of a fatal overdose is "very small" and cannabis was "not as harmful as other illicit drugs such as amphetamine, cocaine and heroin, with which it is classified under the law in many countries". Why keep money in the hands of the black market and keep cannabis readily available to anyone who 'knows a guy' when we can see this approach is not effective. In Colorado, LESS teens have been smoking cannabis since legalisation...



News Moderator - The General @ 420 MAGAZINE ®
Source: Mkweb.co.uk
Author: Jessica Duncan
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Website: Milton Keynes pro-cannabis group slams Professor Wayne Hall's report | MK News
 
Cannabis should be legalized and regulated like ... coffee. The two have similar addicting qualities. Cannabis is superior in providing positive health benefits.