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Mini photography tutorial

nivek

Photo of the Month: Oct 2018
heya,, i wrote this for my journal,, it is not the ultimate tutorial,, but might help some undestand a few things,, please correct if necessary


mr mr,, a post on your photography question

MrMysfyt

Re: Nivek's Need to Know Nature - First Grow Journal - 2015
Hey nivek, do you use photo-bracketing/HDR to get those colours on your close-up bud shots?... very impressive and beautiful shots, however you do it.

first off,, thanks for your kind words,, appreciated

as i have posted,, i have some photography in my background,, or was it i had some backgrounds for my photography,, aargh,, i forget now,,, both probably,, yes,, both,,

and because of that background i know my way around a camera pretty well. that for starters

electronic cameras are like smart phones,, they have more powers than most folks know what to do with. most folks only use 1 to 10 percent of what their cameras can actually do. i am making those numbers up but maybe you know what i mean. for instance,, the manual for my camera is a small book,, and a boring one too

that said,, all that electronic stuff just gets in the way anyway,, not really necessary for taking good pics,, and absolutely 'unnecessary' for taking good close ups.

this point for sweetsue as well,,

she also mentioned about the colours in my photos,, as did you,,, the colours i achieve are not completely my decision, must admit,, the last step i take when editing my photos that i will upload here is 'AUTO CORRECT' ha. sometimes i keep the auto settings,, sometimes not,, and even more rarer will i go in and manually correct the image. the 'actual' 'factual' colour is not really important,, right,, just the vividness and saturation,, both important.

the light source the subject is under determines the colours, to a large extent,, just like there are two coloured bulbs,, one for veg, one for flower,, if a pic was taken of the same subject under both different lights,, the colours would be different in the picture,,, so

the camera has a setting for which colour the light source is. setting number one,, select the correct light source setting,, my settings have a sunny setting (veg room) and a indoor setting (flower room).

one needs,, if one wants up close and personal photos,, to go back to basics. el manuel. all manual.

manual settings and manual focus

ok,, there are really only two more settings that matter. shutter speed and aperture

shutter speed is easy.

set it to 1/60th and leave it. end of story. brief info on that, so actually not end of story,, 1/60th is the lowest setting one can use,, hand held, and not get shake and blur from the shake. and for these pics,, no reason to be faster,, unless you want to take pics throwing the plants across the room,, then faster speeds is better to 'catch' the action

next and by far the most useful and maybe important setting is the aperture. this determines 'depth of field',,what is in focus and what is not. range from 2.8 or so to 16 or so

a low number gives 'less' depth of field, meaning less in focus,, a high number, more depth of field

even in my brightest area in my lab, with my camera set at 1/60th, i still have to use a low depth of field,, f3.5 to 6 or so

what that means is one needs to be very accurate with their manual focus. the camera has a macro mode. meaning for closeups, , manual focus, and manual settings. man, that's a lotto manuals

I don't. photo bracket,, i get in there, up close, for sometimes lengthy times, many seconds, focusing, with the shutter button half way pressed I can see what my settings are doing,, i get it just right, in my eyes, real up close, and i take a breath, and pop the trigger. then I preview the shot,, greatest thing about digital cameras imo btw, and take another shot, till i get it right,, and yes, sometimes I adjust the settinge, so i guess that is bracketing, a bit

so take a bunch of shots, and select the best on the computer,, a bit of cropping,, then 'AUTO CORRECT', and into the journal it goes,, simple eh,, ha

cheers for now,, i will read and. maybe edit this now

one other setting barely worth mentioning, not barely, is important to get the 'best' from your camera is ASA. this is a seriously silly setting that has no reason to even be on a digital camera. it basically is a setting to 'dumb down' a camera. for the best image, this setting needs to be at its lowest,, probably 100
 

Edward76

New Member
Photography is not my thing actually. I can't take a good photo regardless of the quality of the camera. I have tried to read some tutorial once or twice. But, no progress, I need some practical tutorial. But to be honest, I gave up already. I admitted that photography is not my thing. I meant to be something more greater.
 

JeffSher

Member
heya,, i wrote this for my journal,, it is not the ultimate tutorial,, but might help some undestand a few things,, please correct if necessary


mr mr,, a post on your photography question

MrMysfyt

Re: Nivek's Need to Know Nature - First Grow Journal - 2015
Hey nivek, do you use photo-bracketing/HDR to get those colours on your close-up bud shots?... very impressive and beautiful shots, however you do it.

first off,, thanks for your kind words,, appreciated

as i have posted,, i have some photography in my background,, or was it i had some backgrounds for my photography,, aargh,, i forget now,,, both probably,, yes,, both,,

and because of that background i know my way around a camera pretty well. that for starters

electronic cameras are like smart phones,, they have more powers than most folks know what to do with. most folks only use 1 to 10 percent of what their cameras can actually do. i am making those numbers up but maybe you know what i mean. for instance,, the manual for my camera is a small book,, and a boring one too

that said,, all that electronic stuff just gets in the way anyway,, not really necessary for taking good pics,, and absolutely 'unnecessary' for taking good close ups.

this point for sweetsue as well,,

she also mentioned about the colours in my photos,, as did you,,, the colours i achieve are not completely my decision, must admit,, the last step i take when editing my photos that i will upload here is 'AUTO CORRECT' ha. sometimes i keep the auto settings,, sometimes not,, and even more rarer will i go in and manually correct the image. the 'actual' 'factual' colour is not really important,, right,, just the vividness and saturation,, both important.

the light source the subject is under determines the colours, to a large extent,, just like there are two coloured bulbs,, one for veg, one for flower,, if a pic was taken of the same subject under both different lights,, the colours would be different in the picture,,, so

the camera has a setting for which colour the light source is. setting number one,, select the correct light source setting,, my settings have a sunny setting (veg room) and a indoor setting (flower room).

one needs,, if one wants up close and personal photos,, to go back to basics. el manuel. all manual.

manual settings and manual focus

ok,, there are really only two more settings that matter. shutter speed and aperture

shutter speed is easy.

set it to 1/60th and leave it. end of story. brief info on that, so actually not end of story,, 1/60th is the lowest setting one can use,, hand held, and not get shake and blur from the shake. and for these pics,, no reason to be faster,, unless you want to take pics throwing the plants across the room,, then faster speeds is better to 'catch' the action

next and by far the most useful and maybe important setting is the aperture. this determines 'depth of field',,what is in focus and what is not. range from 2.8 or so to 16 or so

a low number gives 'less' depth of field, meaning less in focus,, a high number, more depth of field

even in my brightest area in my lab, with my camera set at 1/60th, i still have to use a low depth of field,, f3.5 to 6 or so

what that means is one needs to be very accurate with their manual focus. the camera has a macro mode. meaning for closeups, , manual focus, and manual settings. man, that's a lotto manuals

I don't. photo bracket,, i get in there, up close, for sometimes lengthy times, many seconds, focusing, with the shutter button half way pressed I can see what my settings are doing,, i get it just right, in my eyes, real up close, and i take a breath, and pop the trigger. then I preview the shot,, greatest thing about digital cameras imo btw, and take another shot, till i get it right,, and yes, sometimes I adjust the settinge, so i guess that is bracketing, a bit

so take a bunch of shots, and select the best on the computer,, a bit of cropping,, then 'AUTO CORRECT', and into the journal it goes,, simple eh,, ha

cheers for now,, i will read and. maybe edit this now

one other setting barely worth mentioning, not barely, is important to get the 'best' from your camera is ASA. this is a seriously silly setting that has no reason to even be on a digital camera. it basically is a setting to 'dumb down' a camera. for the best image, this setting needs to be at its lowest,, probably 100
Quite right; we can't hand hold a sharp shot slower than (1/60). So the answer is of course, to use a tripod. Smaller apertures like f11or f16 can give you a nicer depth of field and gather in a beautiful quality of light and colour if given the time. A tripod also allows you to use a lower ISO setting as well. You can now (with the Tripod) put your camera into full manual mode and manipulate aperture, shutter speed, and ISO to whatever pleases your eye!
 
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