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Nute injections to stem with syringe?

Does injecting plants directly with a syringe help it get extra nutrients?


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Gardenseed

Well-Known Member
I performed this experiment on my 2nd grow. After the plants were into there 3rd week of flowering I was worried my 3 litter pots were to small. Having done allot of reading and research everything pointed to the plant having access to water and nutes when it needs without drowning the roots or burning the plant with over feeding. After contemplating for some time. I injected a week solution into the main steam. I tried multiple times to get the needle into the hollow of the plant. It was fairly easy to get the liquid injection into the Afghani strain as it grows tall and the middle of the stem is nice and hollow. The kush was almost impossible to inject.

I did not perform a controlled experiment so my results are inconclusive but I ended up with the biggest buds ever.
However I will be testing this theory again under very controlled circumstances.

I'm curious to find out if there's been any scientific or mad scientist research on this.
 

LEDBud

Well-Known Member
Never know unless you test against a control like you mentioned and retest a few times to see if its repeatable.

I am doubtful but that means little

I went to read up on how roots pass nutrients and found the below explanation informative

The nutrient uptake process

Uptake of nutrients by a plant root is an active process.
As water is taken up to support transpiration, nutrients may be moved to the root surface through mass
flow. But they are not taken directly into the root.

The plasma membrane of the endoderm
blocks the movement of ions into the root. At this point an active uptake process which requires
energy is used to move the nutrients into the root and xylem for transport to the growing tissues.
A specific protein carrier is used to bind with a nutrient ion and carry it across the membrane.

This active uptake process is a selective process. The root discriminates and only expends
energy to take up nutrients it needs. Thus nutrient uptake is not proportional to the ratios of
nutrients in the soil solution. Ions in large supply in the soil solution, such as calcium and sulfur,
can accumulate near the root. In perennial plants this can actually result in visible quantities of
calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate precipitating and coating old roots.

One important implication of the plants ability to pick and choose nutrients from the soil solution
is the relative unimportance of the ratio of nutrients in the soil solution. As long as a given
nutrient is supplied to the root surface at a concentration high enough to meet the demands of
nutrient uptake, the demands of growth and development will normally be met. For example, the
ratio of calcium and magnesium on the soil cation exchange sites and in soil solution has little
effect on the ratio of these nutrients in the plant.

The plant selects the ions it needs, allowing the others to accumulate in the soil solution at the root surface. Altering the soil to supply adequate amounts, the concept of critical concentrations, has generally proven more cost effective than
altering soils to provide ratios of nutrients equivalent to the ratios at which the nutrients are
found in the plants
 

Gardenseed

Well-Known Member
What got me thinking about this was the fact that I had really small pots and the root system was underdeveloped, or restricted. I was thinking like how an Intra venus helps humans re-hydrate. Also I was thinking that the photosynthesis process uses carbon dioxide water and light to make the sugar that the plant needs. What if say your plant is able to process 100 points of sugar per day and its only able to create 90 points by photosynthesis, would it not benefit from any extra "raw sugar" added into the stem? Root systems can't intake sugar, or so I read some were.
 

Gardenseed

Well-Known Member
In my first experiment I was giving 1cc of very dilute nute solution in the morning, and just before lights out I was injecting 1cc of dilute raw sugar. The results were are a good indication that it not hurt, healthy looking plants with beautiful big buds.
 

jodyhighrollr

Well-Known Member
hi n did it work
I’m guessing not. I don’t see any replies. I only use organic soil so I would just top dress. Soil makes a buffer to the roots so I imagine it’d be easy to overfeed your plants especially if giving constant feedings.. I imagine you’d get some build up
 

Slowpuffer

Well-Known Member
In my first experiment I was giving 1cc of very dilute nute solution in the morning, and just before lights out I was injecting 1cc of dilute raw sugar. The results were are a good indication that it not hurt, healthy looking plants with beautiful big buds.
Inject a cc of tiger bloom !! Lol !!
 
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