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Ph Level

doobiedoo

New Member
My seedlings are on day 9 of the vegetative phase. I don't want to risk burning the plants this early, so I have been sparing with the nutrients in the reservoir. I have a 4-gallon reservoir, and I have added 2 Tsp Grow Big (6-4-4) (Fox Farm) and 3 Tsp Big Bloom (0.01-0.3-0.7) (Fox Farm) per gallon. I am using regular tap water, which is slightly basic. Furthermore, I am using Fox Farm's Light Warrior and plugs for the growing medium. The Ph is currently at 7.2. Should I be concerned about the Ph this early in the growing process? If so, should I add more nutrients to lower the Ph, or should I add some Ph down to the reservoir?

Thanks for your help, mates. I shall start a grow journal soon. :)
 

doobiedoo

New Member
Ok, mates, I added some pH down (1 Tsp) to the reservoir solution, and I got the pH down to 6.2. Any suggestions? :headbang:
 

doobiedoo

New Member
Heya! Thanks for the advice, Akorn. I use pH down every time I balance the nutrients and top off the water. I am able to get the pH to 6.0-6.3 after 1/2 Tsp of ph down. Are the reservoir temps important? What should they be, and what do you recommend to measure it? Should I keep a thermometer in the reservoir at all times?
 

doobiedoo

New Member
I just read a post from Stix, and I like the idea of lowering the pH to 5.5 and letting it rise over the course of the day for the most efficient absorption of nutrients. What do you think?

Also, is it possible that I'm using too much pH down? I would probably have to use 1 Tsp to get it to 5.5 after adding the nutrients to my reservoir (with slightly basic tap water--4-gallon reservoir). Also, keep in mind that I have to use pH down every time I top off the reservoir or change the nutrients. Is this normal?
 

Akornpatch

New Member
Your res temps should be in the 70-75 degree range. Closer to 70 the better, because cooler water holds more oxygen.

You can use a simple aquarium thermometer...the floating kind is easy to use and read. Plus you can just leave it n your res at all times.

your PH is going to be constantly changing, and i like the theory you Stix is talking about.
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
I have to step in here and say this...your resevoir should not be higher than 70df. 65df would even be better. Anything over 70 has a chance of growing algea and molds which are detrimental to your crop. Resevoir temps are extremely important!
I use a digital meter that has a probe that sits in the res and has a alarm that tell me when the res gets too hot or too cold. I set the temps at which temp it goes off at. You can buy them on the net. Look for them at the huge online auction site we all love so much.
 
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doobiedoo

New Member
Much obliged for the wisdom, Racefan!:smoke2: Thanks to you and Akorn, I will not neglect something as important as reservoir temperature.
 

Pirate

New Member
Not to highjack Doobiedoos thread here but I figure this question might help him and me.

If Res. Temp. is a bit high.............how would one go about lowering it?
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
Placing cold water into the resevoir will dilute the nutrients which will deprive the plant of elements it needs. The easiest way is to freeze small plastic bottle of water and put them into the resevoir. I placed a small pc fan at a angle blowing across the resevoir and got a 5 to 7 degree drop in temps. The best and most correct way to cool a resevoir is to buy and use a chiller. There are plans all over the internet on how to make your own. I've seen complex ones that utilize window air conditioners taken apart and made into great chillers or cheap ones that are nothing but a coil of plastic tubing in the resevoir. One end hooked to the cold water faucet. The other goes to a drain. The more cold water you run through the tubing, the cooler the resevoir. It can get quite expensive if you have to pay for your water and quite messy if you utilize a septic tank. Running water tends to over flow septic tanks for some reason.;)
To end this...there are as many ways to cool a resevoir as there are growers to think these ways up. Search the internet for ideas or get inventive. Who knows...maybe you'll figure out the absolute easiest and cheapest method to date.:3:
 

doobiedoo

New Member
Great feedback, mates. I see a lot about the cutoff for high temps, but what is the cutoff for low temps? From what I have read, 60f is the perfect temp. Is it safe to say that 50f to 75f is "safe"?
 

Stix

New Member
I have to step in here and say this...your resevoir should not be higher than 70df. 65df would even be better. Anything over 70 has a chance of growing algea and molds which are detrimental to your crop. Resevoir temps are extremely important!
I use a digital meter that has a probe that sits in the res and has a alarm that tell me when the res gets too hot or too cold. I set the temps at which temp it goes off at. You can buy them on the net. Look for them at the huge online auction site we all love so much.

That's one thing about growing MJ. There is always something else to be learned. I didn't know that about the resevoir temps. Thanks for the info Racefan.
 

Racefan

Well-Known Member
Great feedback, mates. I see a lot about the cutoff for high temps, but what is the cutoff for low temps? From what I have read, 60f is the perfect temp. Is it safe to say that 50f to 75f is "safe"?

I was told by a good friend that I consider a expert hydroponics grower that with a root zone temp of 50 degrees fahrenheit plants stop growing. Because of that information, I myself keep my reservoir between 55 and 68. Anything lower or higher and a alarm sounds.
 
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