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Purposeful mutations?

RiseAgainst

New Member
My question is, is it possible to mutate a plant or seed on purpose? I ask this because if it is possible i think it would be interesting to see what develops. Also what are the odds of it being a positive mutation such as higher thc or more bud production or even a change in coloration.
 

Smokin Moose

Fallen Cannabis Warrior
You will have to refer to Monsanto on this me thinks lol. Genetic manipulation is way beyond my realm of understanding, but I hate to imagine what it may do to cannabis as we know it today. Interesting concept for a thread though. I will be keen to see what thoughts come out of this.
 

RiseAgainst

New Member
well it would be the same as breeding for certain traits you like about different plants of the same strain but the different traits would be more common and pronounced.

P.S. no scientist lol I'm pulling these facts out of guesses more or less
 

Smokin Moose

Fallen Cannabis Warrior
There would have to be a lot of study done on the genetics of cannabis before any manipulation was contemplated. Studies cost money and there is just not the research dollars available, so it will most likely stay a pipe-dream (pun intended) lol.
 

RiseAgainst

New Member
Why would you need studies? Im not talking about mutation of select genes or something. All you would need is a mutagen. Though if marijuana mutates like humans, when was the last time you say someone deformed in a good way?
 

SmokeyMacPot

New Member
Monsanto corp or its susiduary Baeir pharmisutical sorry for my spelling yes the people that make advil. Have a couple patents on their genetically enhaced cannabis for their Sativex medical spray. They have this thing i think is called a partical accelorator which is basically a .22 calliber round shooting genetic particals into live cells of a fresh cutting. Then the resulting plant will carry the genetic traits that had been shot into it.

As with just hybrids, I recall that Willy Jack or some other breeder was experimenting with just making tripholiates. Which is a pretty common mutation in cannabis. Where they grow 3 shoots per node instead of 2. I am not sure about his results, but I have gotten atleast 20 tripholiates in my time. As well as the crinkle leaf mutation very commonly seen on Blueberrys.
 

mr.mike

New Member
GW pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Bayer, makes Sativex. Do you have the patent numbers, or any other information about the process?

I'm sure that the "gene gun" process is not used in the production of these plants. For instance, shooting genes into big leaves won't do anything you need. You'd have to do some kind of protoplast fusion, or some other molecular biology/developmental biology nonsense to get results.

This is definitely not mutation.

Mutation is where you grow a strain of weed under HPS for 5 years straight, and wonder why things are going wrong, for a common instance (some say). Most mutations are fatal. Most growers never encounter true mutation, as sprouts don't even form.

Favorable mutation? Only if the resulting plant is better growing and reproducing that others. Coloration would not be considered advantageous.

To say there has been no genetic studies of cannabis is simply false. I know there are RFLP tests to determine the origin of cannabis samples, so there has been considerable study, just for that example. If it's an economic crop, it's been studied, and in depth. Maybe just not in the US, but I guarantee with US dollars...
 
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vonmises

New Member
it shouldnt be that hard. What about cloning with another species? I know some -paraguayan- bananas that seem to be half peaches. Best freaking bananas i've ever eaten.
I often think of some super kind mixed with blackberries. Hempberries.
 
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mr.mike

New Member
UVB would be the safest way to try and create mutation, at least you can always turn it off. I don't feel like going into depth, but inducing "jumping genes," or transposons, would be another way.

But really, are you just saying your pot isn't strong enough?
 
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Frog

New Member
One of mine smells like pine trees already :)
AnyBody know if this a
specific strain/pheno/geno trait???

I been playin' with the theory that
enviroment/growing conditions/exposure to bugs and thangs, carries over to the offspring more than some folks think or realize.

You ain't gota' shot 'em up with anything, just expose them to it and breed On.
Expose the next generation and so on and so on,
till ya' get whatcha' lookin' for :3:

And with an indoor generation almost every month ...
what's that in real years?(smrk)
 

FreakNature

New Member
And I was out pulling weeds in the yard preparing to plant a lawn, thinking that if every one of these little single stem weeds that had a little flowering cola of sorts could get you high (if it were a little single stem / single cola hemp plant, 8" tall, 3" diameter), it would take 3 a day, 365 days a year...a 9'x9' patch in the backyard would be all it would take. Just sow 1089 seeds 3" on center in a 33x33 array, and you've got a year's supply. An 8" plant that auto-flowered at the right time...and cheap seeds for those babies; that's all I ask. Or legalization...
 

Respect

New Member
I looked into transposon's a little and it seems that these can be introduced to organisms by scientists. There are multiple types, the most commonly found in plants being retrotransposons. It would seem that retrotransposons replicate DNA patterens and literally increase genome size. In theory couldn't you replicate the Delta-9 patteren, increasing it's presence in the genome and therefore potency of the plant?
 
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mr.mike

New Member
Transposons are called "jumping genes." They move about in plants (and people), and really determine an individuals characteristic.

These were first written about by Barbara McClintock years ago, when she published her paper dealing with indian corn, and why all the kernels are different colored.

They are in action all the times inside plants, and are also responsible for the "best looking" mothers and fathers in breeding. Although the arrangements aren't necessarily heritable.
 
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