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Recommended water treatment

GrahamGreen

New Member
Hello there, I come from a city that has fluoridation and chloramine added to the water. I believe they are less than 10mg/L (<10ppm) each. However, I can't get a solid answer on this one. I'm wondering, is it absolutely necessary to get an RO filter? How easy are they to install (if it is totally necessary to get one)? There must be a less expensive option that aquarium enthusiasts use (I know salt water fish wouldn't stand for it).

Buying bulk distilled water doesn't seem environmentally friendly due to the amount of plastic waste. Just looking for all types of viable solutions! Thanks so much!

For those who are wondering, I'm one of those beginners that reads too much and then becomes anxious due to information overload haha. Hoping for some experienced insight :)

What I do know is that chlorine flashes off into our atmosphere and chloramine does not. I'm pretty sure ammonia is present (within chloramine) and aquarium enthusiasts know a way around it (remembering a conversation with my uncle).

P.S. I also plan on using this for my fruits and vegetables. I hear it makes quite the difference.
 

Rifleman

Member of the Month: Mar 2016 - Plant of the Month: Nov 2015
From a salt water aquarium web site......


Question: How do you remove chloramines from tap water?

Answer: There are three methods that are most commonly used to remove chloramines from tap water.

1) The easiest and least expensive way is to use of a chemical dechlorinating product, but choose one carefully, because not all tap water conditioners or dechlorinators are the same. Read product labels closely, and if a product states that it removes chlorine and chloramines, but has no mention of ammonia, beware. Products such as these are designed to break the chloramine bond, separating the ammonia from the chlorine, at which point the chlorine is eliminated, but the released associated toxic ammonia remains in the water. Again, read labels carefully. In all likelihood a product like this will also state that an additional brand name ammonia eliminating or detoxifying product should be used at the same time. The simplest solution to this problem is to buy a complete three-in-one chlorine, chloramines and ammonia treatment tap water conditioner. Shop and compare prices on top choice tap water conditioners recommended as some of the best we have used, both professionally and personally.

2) Install and filter the tap water through an RO (Reverse Osmosis) unit, but make sure it is a quality model that is designed to remove chlorine, chloramines, and ammonia.

3) A simple faucet or under the counter tap water drinking carbon type filter can be used, but the unit must contain high quality carbon, and unless the water is allowed sufficient contact time, it may not be completely effective. Also, chloramines can exhaust carbon much faster than chlorine alone, and therefore filter cartridges need to be replaced more often. Buying a tap water filter that has an indicator that tells you when it's time to change the cartridge is a good investment here.
 

Cultivator

Member of the Month: Jan 2013 - Plant of the Month: Nov 2016, May 2018 - Nug of the Month: Mar 2018 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Oct 2016
Id go with an RO filter.

Ive never used water like you describe so i have no idea how it may or may not affect plants. But if you install an RO filter which is mega easy, you will know for sure what is in your water and get the best results.
 

GrahamGreen

New Member
From a salt water aquarium web site......


Question: How do you remove chloramines from tap water?

Answer: There are three methods that are most commonly used to remove chloramines from tap water.

1) The easiest and least expensive way is to use of a chemical dechlorinating product, but choose one carefully, because not all tap water conditioners or dechlorinators are the same. Read product labels closely, and if a product states that it removes chlorine and chloramines, but has no mention of ammonia, beware. Products such as these are designed to break the chloramine bond, separating the ammonia from the chlorine, at which point the chlorine is eliminated, but the released associated toxic ammonia remains in the water. Again, read labels carefully. In all likelihood a product like this will also state that an additional brand name ammonia eliminating or detoxifying product should be used at the same time. The simplest solution to this problem is to buy a complete three-in-one chlorine, chloramines and ammonia treatment tap water conditioner. Shop and compare prices on top choice tap water conditioners recommended as some of the best we have used, both professionally and personally.

2) Install and filter the tap water through an RO (Reverse Osmosis) unit, but make sure it is a quality model that is designed to remove chlorine, chloramines, and ammonia.

3) A simple faucet or under the counter tap water drinking carbon type filter can be used, but the unit must contain high quality carbon, and unless the water is allowed sufficient contact time, it may not be completely effective. Also, chloramines can exhaust carbon much faster than chlorine alone, and therefore filter cartridges need to be replaced more often. Buying a tap water filter that has an indicator that tells you when it's time to change the cartridge is a good investment here.

Thank you for the great response. Cultivator too, thank you! I love the community here.

After some deliberation, I think I'm going to purchase an RO filter. My only concern is where I can fit it in an apartment/how I install it. I've seen cool garden hose attachments but I can't seem to find that variety at Home Depot.

Anyways, I must head to school now (after a much needed bong toke). People say it makes you stupid, I find it helps my ADHD (and so does my doctor). Looking forward to continuing this conversation after I make a purchasing decision :)

Oh, wait, something does come to mind though. Does the Vit C in lemons work effectively to break this bond while the citric acid also drops the pH? Or is there not enough Vit C? I don't mind spending money on the right stuff, but I found some of the information on the net to be quite interesting.
 

Cultivator

Member of the Month: Jan 2013 - Plant of the Month: Nov 2016, May 2018 - Nug of the Month: Mar 2018 - Creme de la Creme Photos: Oct 2016
id just buy the bottled ph- as it works and is very cheap.

Ro filter is mega easy to install but i would have a bin or res next to it and have it flowing into that instead of the tank it comes with. just fit a ball valve. loads vids on youtube for installation.
 

GrahamGreen

New Member
Yup, I don't mind it either. I've already got some but I love it when you can go all natural and "get two birds stoned at once". ;)

I've been having a lot of fun building this project. I think I've been getting the most joy out of the designing and building of it all.

Also, what do you guys think of BCNL's growboxes?
 

MickFoster

Well-Known Member
I live in the southeast US and both fluoride and chloramine are in our tap water. I use it everyday with GH MaxiBloom and never had a problem. Nothing easier than turning on the faucet. Also - R/O filters are not environmentally friendly - it takes 3 gallons of water to make one - the excess goes down the drain.
 

GrahamGreen

New Member
The waste factor is definitely a concern but when you have those compounds present in your water you can kill the beneficial bacteria. I can imagine most of it is from the Bacillus family.
 
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MickFoster

Well-Known Member
I don't know anything about killing beneficial bacteria but I do know that I have been using the KISS method, which requires tap water, for years and never had a discolored leaf.
 

GrahamGreen

New Member
I have heard and read that, yes even though those two things are super important, they are not the only factors (according to many sources). Just trying to do the best I can :)
 
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